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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ashraf Mohamadkhani
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Ashraf Mohamadkhani wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Oral microbial community composition is associated with pancreatic cancer: A case-control study in Iran. 2019

Vogtmann, Emily / Han, Yongli / Caporaso, J Gregory / Bokulich, Nicholas / Mohamadkhani, Ashraf / Moayyedkazemi, Alireza / Hua, Xing / Kamangar, Farin / Wan, Yunhu / Suman, Shalabh / Zhu, Bin / Hutchinson, Amy / Dagnall, Casey / Jones, Kristine / Hicks, Belynda / Shi, Jianxin / Malekzadeh, Reza / Abnet, Christian C / Pourshams, Akram. ·Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Center for Applied Microbiome Science, Pathogen and Microbiome Institute, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ, USA. · Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Internal Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Khorramabad, Iran. · Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Department of Biology, School of Computer, Mathematical, and Natural Sciences, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Leidos Biomedical Research Laboratory, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Digestive Disease Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. ·Cancer Med · Pubmed #31750624.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Oral microbiota may be related to pancreatic cancer risk because periodontal disease, a condition linked to multiple specific microbes, has been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We evaluated the association between oral microbiota and pancreatic cancer in Iran. METHODS: A total of 273 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 285 controls recruited from tertiary hospitals and a specialty clinic in Tehran, Iran provided saliva samples and filled out a questionnaire regarding demographics and lifestyle characteristics. DNA was extracted from saliva and the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene was PCR amplified and sequenced on the MiSeq. The sequencing data were processed using the DADA2 plugin in QIIME 2 and taxonomy was assigned against the Human Oral Microbiome Database. Logistic regression and MiRKAT models were calculated with adjustment for potential confounders. RESULTS: No association was observed for alpha diversity with an average of 91.11 (standard deviation [SD] 2.59) sequence variants for cases and 89.42 (SD 2.58) for controls. However, there was evidence for an association between beta diversity and case status. The association between the Bray-Curtis dissimilarity and pancreatic cancer was particularly strong with a MiRKAT P-value of .000142 and specific principal coordinate vectors had strong associations with cancer risk. Several specific taxa were also associated with case status after adjustment for multiple comparisons. CONCLUSION: The overall microbial community appeared to differ between pancreatic cancer cases and controls. Whether these reflect differences evident before development of pancreatic cancer will need to be evaluated in prospective studies.

2 Article An Increased Level of Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. 2019

Masoudi, Sahar / Hassanzadeh Nemati, Amin / Fazli, Hamid Reza / Beygi, Samira / Moradzadeh, Maliheh / Pourshams, Akram / Mohamadkhani, Ashraf. ·Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Golestan Rheumatology Research Center, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Gorgan, Iran. ·Middle East J Dig Dis · Pubmed #31049181.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND Aryl-carbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor, is best known for its ability to mediate the effects of environmental toxins such as 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. AhR is expressed in several tumor cells and regulates the expression of genes in the signal transduction pathways. In this study, we examined the soluble levels of AhR in patients with pancreatic cancer. METHODS 123 samples, including 59 (48%) samples of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma based on histological evidence and 64 (52%) healthy control samples, were evaluated to determine plasma levels of AhR by Enzyme-linked immunoassay. RESULTS The median of AhR among patients was 0.280 ng/mL, which differed considerably from 0.07 ng/mL in the control group (

3 Article Mutations in Known and Novel cancer Susceptibility Genes in Young Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Alimirzaie, Sahar / Mohamadkhani, Ashraf / Masoudi, Sahar / Sellars, Erin / Boffetta, Paolo / Malekzadeh, Reza / Akbari, Mohammad R / Pourshams, Akram. ·Faculty of Arts & Science, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Digestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Women's College Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·Arch Iran Med · Pubmed #29940740.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth most common cause of mortality due to cancer, globally. It has a poor prognosis and is usually diagnosed at later stages when tumor resection is not possible. Heritability for pancreatic cancer is relatively high and clinically significant. METHODS: A group of 24 pancreatic cancer patients with young age at onset, from a referral hospital in Tehran University of Medical Sciences were screened for mutations in 710 cancer relevant genes using next generation sequencing technology. RESULTS: Two patients had pathogenic mutations in known pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1/2. Two other patients also had potentially pathogenic mutations in 2 novel candidate genes including PARP4 and EXO1. CONCLUSION: BRCA1/2 genes are the most commonly mutated pancreatic cancer susceptibility genes that should be considered in all pancreatic cancer cases with young age at onset or a family history of cancer. PARP4 and EXO1 also are potential candidate genes for susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. Identifying the hereditary cases of pancreatic cancer will help to offer more targeted treatments to the patients and also to prevent cancer in family members who might be a mutation carrier.

4 Article Pancreatic Cancer is Associated with Peripheral Leukocyte Oxidative DNA Damage 2017

Mohamadkhani, Ashraf / Pourshams, Akram / Viti, Jessica / Cellai, Filippo / Mortazavi, Kamran / Sharafkhah, Maryam / Sotoudeh, Masoud / Malekzadeh, Reza / Boffetta, Paolo / Peluso, Marco. ·Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Disease Research Institute, Shariati Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Email: m.peluso@ispo.toscana.it, akrampourshams@gmail.com ·Asian Pac J Cancer Prev · Pubmed #28612585.

ABSTRACT: Background: DNA damage accumulation has been linked to the cancer phenotype. The purpose of this study was to compare the levels of DNA base 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and C-reactive protein (CRP) inflammatory markers in healthy controls and pancreatic cancer patients from a hospital-based case-control study. Materials and Methods: Fifty-five pancreatic cancer patients and 55 healthy controls were enrolled from a pool of patients referred to the Endoscopic Ultrasound (EUS) center. Analysis of DNA content of peripheral blood cells was conducted for 8-OHdG with the 32P-postlabelling assay. Serum CRP levels were measured by high-sensitivity assays and demographic data for comparison were collected from individual medical records. Results: The group of cases showed significant increased median (IQR) 8-OHdG DNA adducts/106 nucleotides and CRP compared to the controls (208.8 (138.0-340.8) vs 121.8 (57.7-194.8) RAL value; P<0.001) and (3.5 (1.5-8.6) vs 0.5 (0.2-1.5) mg/L P<0.001). A number of conditional regression models confirmed associations of pancreatic cancer with oxidative DNA damage in peripheral leukocytes.Conclusions: Our findings suggest the importance of leukocyte 8-OHdG adducts as an indicator for systemic oxidative DNA damage in pancreatic cancer patients. In addition to increase in the CRP inflammatory marker, this supports the impact of inflammation in the occurrence of pancreatic cancer as well as inflammatory responses during cancer development.

5 Article Opium use, cigarette smoking, and alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer. 2016

Shakeri, Ramin / Kamangar, Farin / Mohamadnejad, Mehdi / Tabrizi, Reza / Zamani, Farhad / Mohamadkhani, Ashraf / Nikfam, Sepideh / Nikmanesh, Arash / Sotoudeh, Masoud / Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul / Shahbazkhani, Bijan / Ostovaneh, Mohammad Reza / Islami, Farhad / Poustchi, Hossein / Boffetta, Paolo / Malekzadeh, Reza / Pourshams, Akram. ·aDigestive Oncology Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran bDigestive Disease Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran cDepartment of Public Health Analysis, School of Community Health and Policy, Morgan State University, Baltimore, MD dLiver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences eGastrointestinal and Liver Disease Research Center, Firoozgar Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences fSasan Alborz Biomedical Research Center, Masoud Gastroenterology and Hepatology Clinic, Tehran, Iran gDivision of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD hAmerican Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA iInstitute for Transitional Epidemiology and the Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #27428185.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although several studies have suggested opium as a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, stomach, larynx, lung, and bladder, no previous study has examined the association of opium with pancreatic cancer. We aimed to study the association between opium use and risk of pancreatic cancer in Iran, using a case-control design. We also studied the association of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption with pancreatic cancer, for which little information was available from this population. METHODS: Cases and controls were selected from patients who were referred to 4 endoscopic ultrasound centers in Tehran, Iran. We recruited 316 histopathologically (all adenocarcinoma) and 41 clinically diagnosed incident cases of pancreatic cancer, as well as 328 controls from those with a normal pancreas in enodosonography from January 2011 to January 2015. We used logistic regression models to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounders, opium use (OR 1.91; 95% CI 1.06-3.43) and alcohol consumption (OR 4.16; 95% CI 1.86-9.31) were significantly associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We did not find an association between ever tobacco smoking and pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.62-1.39). CONCLUSION: In our study, opium use and alcohol consumption were associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas cigarette smoking was not.

6 Article Direct Sequencing of Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) Revealed an Intronic Variant rs201231411 in Iranian Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. 2015

Mohamadkhani, Ashraf / Akbari, Mohammad Reza / Ghanbari, Reza / Naderi, Elnaz / Rezanejad-Asl, Parisa / Pourshams, Akram. ·1. Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Institute, Digestive Diseases. · 2. Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · 3. Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·Middle East J Dig Dis · Pubmed #25628848.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND There are hoarding documents for the biological importance of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in pancreatic carcinogenesis. We aimed to thoroughly investigate the DNA sequence variations of whole COX-2 exons in a large case-control study of pancreatic cancer by direct sequencing. METHODS The entire exonic regions of COX-2 including 10 exons were sequenced in the germline DNA of 96 patients with pancreatic cancer. Selected variants within exons six to seven (E6E7) amplicon from the test panel were genotyped in 96 controls. RESULTS The COX-2 gene was demonstrated to be genetically conserved. Four missense mutations were found in three cases. However the common variant c.724-10_724-7delATTT (rs201231411) that is located in intron 6, showed significant difference between cases and controls (21 [21.9%] vs 11 [%11.5], p=0.05). CONCLUSION This study determined that COX-2 has a conservative sequence, which is required for its enzymatic activity and supports the important role of this enzyme's expression in pancreatic cancer rather than any changes in its activity. The effect of intronic variant rs201231411 on COX-2 expression could be analyzed in future studies.

7 Article Network of microRNAs-mRNAs interactions in pancreatic cancer. 2014

Naderi, Elnaz / Mostafaei, Mehdi / Pourshams, Akram / Mohamadkhani, Ashraf. ·Liver and Pancreatobiliary Diseases Research Center, Digestive Diseases Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. · Biotechnology Engineering, Islamic Azad University,Tehran North Branch, Tehran, Iran. ·Biomed Res Int · Pubmed #24895587.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs are small RNA molecules that regulate the expression of certain genes through interaction with mRNA targets and are mainly involved in human cancer. This study was conducted to make the network of miRNAs-mRNAs interactions in pancreatic cancer as the fourth leading cause of cancer death. METHODS: 56 miRNAs that were exclusively expressed and 1176 genes that were downregulated or silenced in pancreas cancer were extracted from beforehand investigations. MiRNA-mRNA interactions data analysis and related networks were explored using MAGIA tool and Cytoscape 3 software. Functional annotations of candidate genes in pancreatic cancer were identified by DAVID annotation tool. RESULTS: This network is made of 217 nodes for mRNA, 15 nodes for miRNA, and 241 edges that show 241 regulations between 15 miRNAs and 217 target genes. The miR-24 was the most significantly powerful miRNA that regulated series of important genes. ACVR2B, GFRA1, and MTHFR were significant target genes were that downregulated. CONCLUSION: Although the collected previous data seems to be a treasure trove, there was no study simultaneous to analysis of miRNAs and mRNAs interaction. Network of miRNA-mRNA interactions will help to corroborate experimental remarks and could be used to refine miRNA target predictions for developing new therapeutic approaches.