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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Funda Meric-Bernstam
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, F. Meric-Bernstam wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Everolimus in advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: the clinical experience. 2013

Yao, James C / Phan, Alexandria T / Jehl, Valentine / Shah, Gaurav / Meric-Bernstam, Funda. ·Departments of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology and Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. jyao@mdanderson.org ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #23436795.

ABSTRACT: The incidence of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) has increased dramatically in the past 30 years. This information has revitalized basic and clinical research into the molecular biology of NET and has resulted in the recent approval of new therapies for pancreatic NET (pNET), including the oral inhibitor of the mTOR everolimus. Everolimus significantly improved progression-free survival among patients with pNET in the phase III RADIANT-3 study. Here, we review the clinical studies showing the efficacy of everolimus in pNET and summarize the translational science from these studies. To understand the mechanisms of resistance and cause of treatment failure, we compared the type of progression events observed in the everolimus and placebo arms of the RADIANT-3 study. Comparison of the everolimus arm to the placebo arm indicated the fractions of progression events due to new metastasis only (21% vs. 22%), growth of preexisting lesions only (54% vs. 49%), and new metastasis along with growth of preexisting lesions (24% vs. 27%) were similar. These results suggest that although everolimus delays disease progression in patients with pNET, patients who experience disease progression while on everolimus do not appear to have a more aggressive metastatic phenotype than those whose disease progresses while on placebo.

2 Article Outcomes of phase I clinical trials for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: update of the MD Anderson Cancer Center experience. 2017

Goldstein, Jennifer B / Tang, Chad / Hess, Kenneth R / Hong, David / Subbiah, Vivek / Janku, Filip / Fu, Siqing / Karp, Daniel D / Naing, Aung / Tsimberidou, Apostolia Maria / Wheler, Jennifer / Zinner, Ralph / Javle, Milind / Varadhachary, Gauri R / Wolff, Robert A / Fogelman, David R / Meric-Bernstam, Funda / Piha-Paul, Sarina A. ·Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #29152071.

ABSTRACT: Background: In 2011, we reported the outcomes of pancreatic cancer (PC) patients enrolled in phase I trials at our institution from 2004 through 2009. At the time, gemcitabine and erlotinib were the only Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for PC and median overall survival (OS) from consultation in the phase I clinic was 5 months. We sought to determine the impact of novel therapeutics on PC patients in phase I trials. Methods: We reviewed records of PC patients treated in phase I trials at our institution from January 2009 through December 2014. Survival was analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Ninety-five patients were identified. The median age was 61 years (range, 40-84), 59% were men, and 41% had stage IV disease. The median OS from consultation in the phase I clinic was 5.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.5-6.8), and the 1-year OS rate was 9% (95% CI, 4%-17%). Three patients had partial responses and 18 had stable disease ≥ 4 months. Conclusion: We observed no improvement in OS between PC patients enrolled in phase I trials in 2004-2009 and 2009-2015. To substantially improve OS in this challenging disease, improved patient selection and science-driven, innovative trial designs will be key.

3 Article High prevalence of mutant KRAS in circulating exosome-derived DNA from early-stage pancreatic cancer patients. 2017

Allenson, K / Castillo, J / San Lucas, F A / Scelo, G / Kim, D U / Bernard, V / Davis, G / Kumar, T / Katz, M / Overman, M J / Foretova, L / Fabianova, E / Holcatova, I / Janout, V / Meric-Bernstam, F / Gascoyne, P / Wistuba, I / Varadhachary, G / Brennan, P / Hanash, S / Li, D / Maitra, A / Alvarez, H. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Sheikh Ahmed Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Genetic Epidemiology Group International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Department of GI Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banska Bystrica, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Palacky University of Medicine, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics and the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy, Houston, USA. · Section of Experimental Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA · Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28104621.

ABSTRACT: Background: Exosomes arise from viable cancer cells and may reflect a different biology than circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) shed from dying tissues. We compare exosome-derived DNA (exoDNA) to cfDNA in liquid biopsies of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods: Patient samples were obtained between 2003 and 2010, with clinically annotated follow up to 2015. Droplet digital PCR was performed on exoDNA and cfDNA for sensitive detection of KRAS mutants at codons 12/13. A cumulative series of 263 individuals were studied, including a discovery cohort of 142 individuals: 68 PDAC patients of all stages; 20 PDAC patients initially staged with localized disease, with blood drawn after resection for curative intent; and 54 age-matched healthy controls. A validation cohort of 121 individuals (39 cancer patients and 82 healthy controls) was studied to validate KRAS detection rates in early-stage PDAC patients. Primary outcome was circulating KRAS status as detected by droplet digital PCR. Secondary outcomes were disease-free and overall survival. Results: KRAS mutations in exoDNA, were identified in 7.4%, 66.7%, 80%, and 85% of age-matched controls, localized, locally advanced, and metastatic PDAC patients, respectively. Comparatively, mutant KRAS cfDNA was detected in 14.8%, 45.5%, 30.8%, and 57.9% of these individuals. Higher exoKRAS MAFs were associated with decreased disease-free survival in patients with localized disease. In the validation cohort, mutant KRAS exoDNA was detected in 43.6% of early-stage PDAC patients and 20% of healthy controls. Conclusions: Exosomes are a distinct source of tumor DNA that may be complementary to other liquid biopsy DNA sources. A higher percentage of patients with localized PDAC exhibited detectable KRAS mutations in exoDNA than previously reported for cfDNA. A substantial minority of healthy samples demonstrated mutant KRAS in circulation, dictating careful consideration and application of liquid biopsy findings, which may limit its utility as a broad cancer-screening method.