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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Andrew Menzies
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Andrew Menzies wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Exome sequencing identifies frequent mutation of the SWI/SNF complex gene PBRM1 in renal carcinoma. 2011

Varela, Ignacio / Tarpey, Patrick / Raine, Keiran / Huang, Dachuan / Ong, Choon Kiat / Stephens, Philip / Davies, Helen / Jones, David / Lin, Meng-Lay / Teague, Jon / Bignell, Graham / Butler, Adam / Cho, Juok / Dalgliesh, Gillian L / Galappaththige, Danushka / Greenman, Chris / Hardy, Claire / Jia, Mingming / Latimer, Calli / Lau, King Wai / Marshall, John / McLaren, Stuart / Menzies, Andrew / Mudie, Laura / Stebbings, Lucy / Largaespada, David A / Wessels, L F A / Richard, Stephane / Kahnoski, Richard J / Anema, John / Tuveson, David A / Perez-Mancera, Pedro A / Mustonen, Ville / Fischer, Andrej / Adams, David J / Rust, Alistair / Chan-on, Waraporn / Subimerb, Chutima / Dykema, Karl / Furge, Kyle / Campbell, Peter J / Teh, Bin Tean / Stratton, Michael R / Futreal, P Andrew. ·Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #21248752.

ABSTRACT: The genetics of renal cancer is dominated by inactivation of the VHL tumour suppressor gene in clear cell carcinoma (ccRCC), the commonest histological subtype. A recent large-scale screen of ∼3,500 genes by PCR-based exon re-sequencing identified several new cancer genes in ccRCC including UTX (also known as KDM6A), JARID1C (also known as KDM5C) and SETD2 (ref. 2). These genes encode enzymes that demethylate (UTX, JARID1C) or methylate (SETD2) key lysine residues of histone H3. Modification of the methylation state of these lysine residues of histone H3 regulates chromatin structure and is implicated in transcriptional control. However, together these mutations are present in fewer than 15% of ccRCC, suggesting the existence of additional, currently unidentified cancer genes. Here, we have sequenced the protein coding exome in a series of primary ccRCC and report the identification of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodelling complex gene PBRM1 (ref. 4) as a second major ccRCC cancer gene, with truncating mutations in 41% (92/227) of cases. These data further elucidate the somatic genetic architecture of ccRCC and emphasize the marked contribution of aberrant chromatin biology.

2 Article The patterns and dynamics of genomic instability in metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2010

Campbell, Peter J / Yachida, Shinichi / Mudie, Laura J / Stephens, Philip J / Pleasance, Erin D / Stebbings, Lucy A / Morsberger, Laura A / Latimer, Calli / McLaren, Stuart / Lin, Meng-Lay / McBride, David J / Varela, Ignacio / Nik-Zainal, Serena A / Leroy, Catherine / Jia, Mingming / Menzies, Andrew / Butler, Adam P / Teague, Jon W / Griffin, Constance A / Burton, John / Swerdlow, Harold / Quail, Michael A / Stratton, Michael R / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Futreal, P Andrew. ·Cancer Genome Project, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton CB10 1SA, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #20981101.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive malignancy with a five-year mortality of 97-98%, usually due to widespread metastatic disease. Previous studies indicate that this disease has a complex genomic landscape, with frequent copy number changes and point mutations, but genomic rearrangements have not been characterized in detail. Despite the clinical importance of metastasis, there remain fundamental questions about the clonal structures of metastatic tumours, including phylogenetic relationships among metastases, the scale of ongoing parallel evolution in metastatic and primary sites, and how the tumour disseminates. Here we harness advances in DNA sequencing to annotate genomic rearrangements in 13 patients with pancreatic cancer and explore clonal relationships among metastases. We find that pancreatic cancer acquires rearrangements indicative of telomere dysfunction and abnormal cell-cycle control, namely dysregulated G1-to-S-phase transition with intact G2-M checkpoint. These initiate amplification of cancer genes and occur predominantly in early cancer development rather than the later stages of the disease. Genomic instability frequently persists after cancer dissemination, resulting in ongoing, parallel and even convergent evolution among different metastases. We find evidence that there is genetic heterogeneity among metastasis-initiating cells, that seeding metastasis may require driver mutations beyond those required for primary tumours, and that phylogenetic trees across metastases show organ-specific branches. These data attest to the richness of genetic variation in cancer, brought about by the tandem forces of genomic instability and evolutionary selection.