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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Julie B. Mendelsohn
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Julie B. Mendelsohn wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Genome-wide association study of survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Wu, Chen / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Steplowski, Emily / Brotzman, Michelle / Xu, Mousheng / Mudgal, Poorva / Amundadottir, Laufey / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Cao, Guangwen / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne W / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Goran / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Jenab, Mazda / Jiang, Guoliang / Khaw, Kay-Tee / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Zhaoshen / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Qian, Zhi Rong / Riboli, Elio / Sesso, Howard / Shen, Hongbing / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjonneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Chengfeng / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S / Lin, Dongxin / Wolpin, Brian M. ·Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, , Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #23180869.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Survival of patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma is limited and few prognostic factors are known. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify germline variants associated with survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: We analysed overall survival in relation to single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among 1005 patients from two large GWAS datasets, PanScan I and ChinaPC. Cox proportional hazards regression was used in an additive genetic model with adjustment for age, sex, clinical stage and the top four principal components of population stratification. The first stage included 642 cases of European ancestry (PanScan), from which the top SNPs (p≤10(-5)) were advanced to a joint analysis with 363 additional patients from China (ChinaPC). RESULTS: In the first stage of cases of European descent, the top-ranked loci were at chromosomes 11p15.4, 18p11.21 and 1p36.13, tagged by rs12362504 (p=1.63×10(-7)), rs981621 (p=1.65×10(-7)) and rs16861827 (p=3.75×10(-7)), respectively. 131 SNPs with p≤10(-5) were advanced to a joint analysis with cases from the ChinaPC study. In the joint analysis, the top-ranked SNP was rs10500715 (minor allele frequency, 0.37; p=1.72×10(-7)) on chromosome 11p15.4, which is intronic to the SET binding factor 2 (SBF2) gene. The HR (95% CI) for death was 0.74 (0.66 to 0.84) in PanScan I, 0.79 (0.65 to 0.97) in ChinaPC and 0.76 (0.68 to 0.84) in the joint analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Germline genetic variation in the SBF2 locus was associated with overall survival in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma of European and Asian ancestry. This association should be investigated in additional large patient cohorts.

2 Article An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population. 2013

Klein, Alison P / Lindström, Sara / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Amundadottir, Laufey / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Bamlet, William R / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hassan, Manal / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Liu, Simin / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Kraft, Peter. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24058443.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

3 Article Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4. 2013

Leenders, Max / Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi / Vineis, Paolo / Stevens, Victoria / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Amundadottir, Laufey / Gross, Myron / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Duell, Eric J / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / Kooperberg, Charles / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Kai / Wolpin, Brian M / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovanucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Tjønneland, Anne / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Elena, Joanne W / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. M.Leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23334854.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed. METHODS: Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. RESULTS: When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95 %CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95 %CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

4 Article Diabetes and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2013

Elena, Joanne W / Steplowski, Emily / Yu, Kai / Hartge, Patricia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Brotzman, Michelle J / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Bao, Ying / Boeing, Heiner / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Duell, Eric J / Hallmans, Göran / Howard, Barbara V / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Phillips, Lawrence S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Simon, Michael S / Slimani, Nadia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolpin, Brian M / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fuchs, Charles S / Hoover, Robert N / Gross, Myron. ·Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. elenajw@mail.nih.gov ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23112111.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Diabetes is a suspected risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but questions remain about whether it is a risk factor or a result of the disease. This study prospectively examined the association between diabetes and the risk of pancreatic adenocarcinoma in pooled data from the NCI pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). METHODS: The pooled data included 1,621 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases and 1,719 matched controls from twelve cohorts using a nested case-control study design. Subjects who were diagnosed with diabetes near the time (<2 years) of pancreatic cancer diagnosis were excluded from all analyses. All analyses were adjusted for age, race, gender, study, alcohol use, smoking, BMI, and family history of pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Self-reported diabetes was associated with a forty percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.07, 1.84). The association differed by duration of diabetes; risk was highest for those with a duration of 2-8 years (OR = 1.79, 95 % CI: 1.25, 2.55); there was no association for those with 9+ years of diabetes (OR = 1.02, 95 % CI: 0.68, 1.52). CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide support for a relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk. The absence of association in those with the longest duration of diabetes may reflect hypoinsulinemia and warrants further investigation.

5 Article Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer. 2012

Li, Donghui / Duell, Eric J / Yu, Kai / Risch, Harvey A / Olson, Sara H / Kooperberg, Charles / Wolpin, Brian M / Jiao, Li / Dong, Xiaoqun / Wheeler, Bill / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Mandelson, Margaret T / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Amundadottir, Laufey / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #22523087.

ABSTRACT: Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 × 10(-6), 1.6 × 10(-5), 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 × 10(-5)), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H.pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.

6 Article Variant ABO blood group alleles, secretor status, and risk of pancreatic cancer: results from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2010

Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Xu, Mousheng / Steplowski, Emily / Olsson, Martin L / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / LaCroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Austin, Melissa A / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kooperberg, Charles / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Sanchéz, Maria-José / Sansbury, Leah / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vineis, Paolo / Visvanathan, Kala / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bwolpin@partners.org ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #20971884.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Subjects with non-O ABO blood group alleles have increased risk of pancreatic cancer. Glycosyltransferase activity is greater for the A(1) versus A(2) variant, whereas O01 and O02 variants are nonfunctioning. We hypothesized: 1) A(1) allele would confer greater risk than A(2) allele, 2) protective effect of the O allele would be equivalent for O01 and O02 variants, 3) secretor phenotype would modify the association with risk. METHODS: We determined ABO variants and secretor phenotype from single nucleotide polymorphisms in ABO and FUT2 genes in 1,533 cases and 1,582 controls from 12 prospective cohort studies. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) for pancreatic cancer were calculated using logistic regression. RESULTS: An increased risk was observed in participants with A(1) but not A(2) alleles. Compared with subjects with genotype O/O, genotypes A(2)/O, A(2)/A(1), A(1)/O, and A(1)/A(1) had ORs of 0.96 (95% CI, 0.72-1.26), 1.46 (95% CI, 0.98-2.17), 1.48 (95% CI, 1.23-1.78), and 1.71 (95% CI, 1.18-2.47). Risk was similar for O01 and O02 variant O alleles. Compared with O01/O01, the ORs for each additional allele of O02, A(1), and A(2) were 1.00 (95% CI, 0.87-1.14), 1.38 (95% CI, 1.20-1.58), and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.77-1.20); P, O01 versus O02 = 0.94, A(1) versus A(2) = 0.004. Secretor phenotype was not an effect modifier (P-interaction = 0.63). CONCLUSIONS: Among participants in a large prospective cohort consortium, ABO allele subtypes corresponding to increased glycosyltransferase activity were associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk. IMPACT: These data support the hypothesis that ABO glycosyltransferase activity influences pancreatic cancer risk rather than actions of other nearby genes on chromosome 9q34.

7 Article Anthropometric measures, body mass index, and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). 2010

Arslan, Alan A / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Kooperberg, Charles / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Steplowski, Emily / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gross, Myron D / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea Z / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Amundadottir, Laufey / Bamlet, William R / Barricarte, Aurelio / Bingham, Sheila A / Boeing, Heiner / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Chanock, Stephen J / Clipp, Sandra / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Kraft, Peter / Lynch, Shannon M / Manjer, Jonas / Manson, Joann E / McTiernan, Anne / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Palli, Domenico / Rohan, Thomas E / Slimani, Nadia / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Patel, Alpa V / Anonymous3240660. ·Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Ave, TH-528, New York, NY 10016, USA. alan.arslan@nyumc.org ·Arch Intern Med · Pubmed #20458087.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Obesity has been proposed as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Pooled data were analyzed from the National Cancer Institute Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) to study the association between prediagnostic anthropometric measures and risk of pancreatic cancer. PanScan applied a nested case-control study design and included 2170 cases and 2209 control subjects. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression for cohort-specific quartiles of body mass index (BMI [calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared]), weight, height, waist circumference, and waist to hip ratio as well as conventional BMI categories (underweight, <18.5; normal weight, 18.5-24.9; overweight, 25.0-29.9; obese, 30.0-34.9; and severely obese, > or = 35.0). Models were adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: In all of the participants, a positive association between increasing BMI and risk of pancreatic cancer was observed (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest BMI quartile, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.12-1.58; P(trend) < .001). In men, the adjusted OR for pancreatic cancer for the highest vs lowest quartile of BMI was 1.33 (95% CI, 1.04-1.69; P(trend) < .03), and in women it was 1.34 (95% CI, 1.05-1.70; P(trend) = .01). Increased waist to hip ratio was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer in women (adjusted OR for the highest vs lowest quartile, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.31-2.69; P(trend) = .003) but less so in men. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide strong support for a positive association between BMI and pancreatic cancer risk. In addition, centralized fat distribution may increase pancreatic cancer risk, especially in women.

8 Article Alcohol intake and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium (PanScan). 2010

Michaud, Dominique S / Vrieling, Alina / Jiao, Li / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Lynch, Shannon M / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Fuchs, Charles S / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Allen, Naomi / Ammundadottir, Laufey / Bergmann, Manuela M / Boffetta, Paolo / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Clipp, Sandra / Freiberg, Matthew S / Michael Gaziano, J / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Allan Hubbell, F / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin / Kooperberg, Charles / Kraft, Peter / Manjer, Jonas / Navarro, Carmen / Peeters, Petra H M / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stevens, Victoria / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wallace, Robert / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College London, London, UK. d.michaud@imperial.ac.uk ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #20373013.

ABSTRACT: The literature has consistently reported no association between low to moderate alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer; however, a few studies have shown that high levels of intake may increase risk. Most single studies have limited power to detect associations even in the highest alcohol intake categories or to examine associations by alcohol type. We analyzed these associations using 1,530 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,530 controls from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) nested case-control study. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using unconditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. We observed no significant overall association between total alcohol (ethanol) intake and pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI = 0.86-2.23, for 60 or more g/day vs. >0 to <5 g/day). A statistically significant increase in risk was observed among men consuming 45 or more grams of alcohol from liquor per day (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.02-4.87, compared to 0 g/day of alcohol from liquor, P-trend = 0.12), but not among women (OR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.63-2.87, for 30 or more g/day of alcohol from liquor, compared to none). No associations were noted for wine or beer intake. Overall, no significant increase in risk was observed, but a small effect among heavy drinkers cannot be ruled out.

9 Article Pancreatic cancer risk and ABO blood group alleles: results from the pancreatic cancer cohort consortium. 2010

Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Steplowski, Emily / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Anderson, Garnet / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chanock, Stephen J / Clipp, Sandra / Gaziano, John Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin / Kooperberg, Charles / Lynch, Shannon M / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Overvad, Kim / Patel, Alpa V / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Sanchéz, Maria-José / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Thomas, Gilles / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles S. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bwolpin@partners.org ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #20103627.

ABSTRACT: A recent genome-wide association study (PanScan) identified significant associations at the ABO gene locus with risk of pancreatic cancer, but the influence of specific ABO genotypes remains unknown. We determined ABO genotypes (OO, AO, AA, AB, BO, and BB) in 1,534 cases and 1,583 controls from 12 prospective cohorts in PanScan, grouping participants by genotype-derived serologic blood type (O, A, AB, and B). Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for pancreatic cancer by ABO alleles were calculated using logistic regression. Compared with blood type O, the ORs for pancreatic cancer in subjects with types A, AB, and B were 1.38 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.18-1.62], 1.47 (95% CI, 1.07-2.02), and 1.53 (95% CI, 1.21-1.92), respectively. The incidence rates for blood types O, A, AB, and B were 28.9, 39.9, 41.8, and 44.5 cases per 100,000 subjects per year. An increase in risk was noted with the addition of each non-O allele. Compared with OO genotype, subjects with AO and AA genotype had ORs of 1.33 (95% CI, 1.13-1.58) and 1.61 (95% CI, 1.22-2.18), whereas subjects with BO and BB genotypes had ORs of 1.45 (95% CI, 1.14-1.85) and 2.42 (1.28-4.57). The population attributable fraction for non-O blood type was 19.5%. In a joint model with smoking, current smokers with non-O blood type had an adjusted OR of 2.68 (95% CI, 2.03-3.54) compared with nonsmokers of blood type O. We concluded that ABO genotypes were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

10 Article A genome-wide association study identifies pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. 2010

Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey / Fuchs, Charles S / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Jacobs, Kevin B / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Bamlet, William R / Berg, Christine D / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / de Andrade, Mariza / Duell, Eric J / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hassan, Manal / Howard, Barbara / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Kooperberg, Charles / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / Lynch, Shannon M / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Parikh, Hemang / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Riboli, Elio / Rodriguez, Laudina / Seminara, Daniela / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fraumeni, Joseph F / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J. ·Department of Health Sciences Research, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #20101243.

ABSTRACT: We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies.

11 Article Family history of cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). 2010

Jacobs, Eric J / Chanock, Stephen J / Fuchs, Charles S / Lacroix, Andrea / McWilliams, Robert R / Steplowski, Emily / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Allen, Naomi E / Amundadottir, Laufey / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Dorronsoro, Miren / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Hankinson, Susan E / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Hunter, David J / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Lynch, Shannon M / Sund, Malin / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Mouw, Tracy / Newton, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Peeters, Petra H M / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Thomas, Gilles / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne. ·Department of Epidemiology, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA. ejacobs@cancer.org ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #20049842.

ABSTRACT: A family history of pancreatic cancer has consistently been associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. However, uncertainty remains about the strength of this association. Results from previous studies suggest a family history of select cancers (i.e., ovarian, breast and colorectal) could also be associated, although not as strongly, with increased risk of pancreatic cancer. We examined the association between a family history of 5 types of cancer (pancreas, prostate, ovarian, breast and colorectal) and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from a collaborative nested case-control study conducted by the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium. Cases and controls were from cohort studies from the United States, Europe and China, and a case-control study from the Mayo Clinic. Analyses of family history of pancreatic cancer included 1,183 cases and 1,205 controls. A family history of pancreatic cancer in a parent, sibling or child was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer [multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) = 1.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-2.61]. A family history of prostate cancer was also associated with increased risk (OR = 1.45, 95% CI = 1.12-1.89). There were no statistically significant associations with a family history of ovarian cancer (OR = 0.82, 95% CI = 0.52-1.31), breast cancer (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.51) or colorectal cancer (OR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.93-1.47). Our results confirm a moderate sized association between a family history of pancreatic cancer and risk of pancreatic cancer and also provide evidence for an association with a family history of prostate cancer worth further study.