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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by S. L. Meijer
Based on 2 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, S. Meijer wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Clinical value of ctDNA in upper-GI cancers: A systematic review and meta-analysis. 2017

Creemers, A / Krausz, S / Strijker, M / van der Wel, M J / Soer, E C / Reinten, R J / Besselink, M G / Wilmink, J W / van de Vijver, M J / van Noesel, C J M / Verheij, J / Meijer, S L / Dijk, F / Bijlsma, M F / van Oijen, M G H / van Laarhoven, H W M. ·Cancer Center Amsterdam, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM)/Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), AMC, The Netherlands; Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, AMC, The Netherlands. Electronic address: a.creemers@amc.uva.nl. · Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, AMC, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, AMC, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, AMC, The Netherlands. · Cancer Center Amsterdam, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM)/Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), AMC, The Netherlands. · Cancer Center Amsterdam, Center for Experimental and Molecular Medicine (CEMM)/Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology (LEXOR), AMC, The Netherlands; Cancer Center Amsterdam, Department of Medical Oncology, AMC, The Netherlands. ·Biochim Biophys Acta Rev Cancer · Pubmed #28801248.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The recent expanding technical possibilities to detect tumor derived mutations in blood, so-called circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), has rapidly increased the interest in liquid biopsies. This review and meta-analysis explores the clinical value of ctDNA in malignancies of the upper gastro-intestinal tract. METHODS: PubMed, Cochrane and Embase databases were searched to identify studies reporting the diagnostic, prognostic or predictive value of ctDNA in patients with esophageal, gastric and pancreatic cancer, until January 2017. The diagnostic accuracy and, using random-effect pair-wise meta-analyses, the prognostic value of ctDNA was assessed. RESULTS: A total of 34 studies met the inclusion criteria. For esophageal and gastric cancer, amplification of oncogenes in blood, such as HER2 and MYC, can be relevant for diagnostic purposes, and to predict treatment response in certain patient subpopulations. Given the limited number of studies assessing the role of ctDNA in esophageal and gastric cancer, the meta-analysis estimated the diagnostic accuracy and predictive value of ctDNA in pancreatic cancer only (n=10). The pooled sensitivity and specificity of ctDNA as a diagnostic tool in pancreatic cancer were 28% and 95%, respectively. Patients with pancreatic cancer and detectable ctDNA demonstrated a worse overall survival compared to patients with undetectable ctDNA (HR 1.92, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-3.22, p=0.01). CONCLUSION: The presence of ctDNA is significantly associated with a poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic cancer. The use of ctDNA in clinical practice is promising, although standardization of sequencing techniques and further development of high-sensitive detection methods is needed.

2 Clinical Trial Anaesthetic management during open and percutaneous irreversible electroporation. 2014

Nielsen, K / Scheffer, H J / Vieveen, J M / van Tilborg, A A J M / Meijer, S / van Kuijk, C / van den Tol, M P / Meijerink, M R / Bouwman, R A. ·Department of Surgery, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Anesthesiology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Anesthesiology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081 HV, Amsterdam, The Netherlands Department of Anaesthesiology, Catharina Hospital, Michelangelolaan 2, 5623 EJ Eindhoven ra.bouwman@gmail.com. ·Br J Anaesth · Pubmed #25173767.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a novel tumour ablation technique involving repetitive application of electrical energy around a tumour. The use of pulsed electrical gradients carries a risk of cardiac arrhythmias, severe muscle contractions, and seizures. We aimed to identify IRE-related risks and the appropriate precautions for anaesthetic management. METHODS: All patients who were treated with IRE were prospectively included. Exclusion criteria were arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, active coronary artery disease, and epilepsy. All procedures were performed under general anaesthesia with complete muscle relaxation during ECG-synchronized pulsing. Adverse events, cardiovascular effects, blood samples, cerebral activity, and post-procedural pain were analysed. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients underwent 30 IRE sessions for tumours in the liver, pancreas, kidney, and lesser pelvis. No major adverse events occurred during IRE. Median systolic and diastolic blood pressure increased by 44 mm Hg (range -7 to 108 mm Hg) and 19 mm Hg (range 1-50 mm Hg), respectively. Two transient minor cardiac arrhythmias without haemodynamic consequences were observed. Muscle contractions were mild and IRE caused no reactive brain activity on a simplified EEG. Pain in the first 24 h after percutaneous IRE was generally mild, but higher pain scores were reported after pancreatic treatment (mean VAS score 3; range 0-9). CONCLUSIONS: Side-effects during IRE on tumours in the liver, pancreas, kidney, and lesser pelvis seem mild and manageable when current recommendations for anaesthesia management, including deep muscle relaxation and ECG synchronized pulsing, are followed. Electrical pulses do not seem to cause reactive cerebral activity and evidence for pre-existing atrial fibrillation as an absolute contra-indication for IRE is questionable.