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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Autumn J. McRee
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, A. J. McRee wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Chemoradiation therapy in the management of gastrointestinal malignancies. 2011

McRee, Autumn J / Cowherd, Stacy / Wang, Andrew Z / Goldberg, Richard M. ·Department of Hematology/Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, NC, USA. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #21417904.

ABSTRACT: Concurrent administration of chemotherapy and radiotherapy has been increasingly used in cancer treatment, leading to improvements in survival as well as quality of life. Currently, it is a feasible preference, often regarded as the standard therapeutic option, for many locally confined solid tumors, including anal, bladder, cervical, esophageal, gastric, head and neck, lung, pancreatic and rectal cancers. In patients with these tumors, combined modality therapy improves local tumor control and survival while, in some instances, obviating the need for surgical removal of the organ of origin. The scientific rationale for the use of chemoradiation derives from the preclinical and clinical observations of synergistic interactions between radiotherapy and chemotherapy. When chemotherapy and radiotherapy are administered together, the chemotherapeutic agents can sensitize the cancer cells to the effects of ionizing radiation, leading to increased tumor-killing effects within the radiotherapy field. This, in turn, can improve local control of the primary tumor and, in some cancers, render surgical resection unnecessary. In other cases, patients with tumors that were initially considered unresectable are able to undergo curative interventions after completing chemoradiation. The chemotherapy component can address any potential micrometastatic disease that, without therapy, leads to an increased risk of distant recurrence. A large body of evidence exists that supports the use of chemoradiotherapy in gastrointestinal cancers. In fact, one of the first tumor types in which the superior efficacy of chemoradiation was described was anal cancer. Since then, chemoradiotherapy has been explored in other gastrointestinal malignancies with superior outcomes when compared with either radiation or chemotherapy alone. This article aims to recapitulate the clinical evidence supporting the use of chemoradiotherapy in a variety of gastrointestinal tumor types.

2 Clinical Trial A phase II/III randomized study to compare the efficacy and safety of rigosertib plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with previously untreated metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2015

O'Neil, B H / Scott, A J / Ma, W W / Cohen, S J / Leichman, L / Aisner, D L / Menter, A R / Tejani, M A / Cho, J K / Granfortuna, J / Coveler, A L / Olowokure, O O / Baranda, J C / Cusnir, M / Phillip, P / Boles, J / Nazemzadeh, R / Rarick, M / Cohen, D J / Radford, J / Fehrenbacher, L / Bajaj, R / Bathini, V / Fanta, P / Berlin, J / McRee, A J / Maguire, R / Wilhelm, F / Maniar, M / Jimeno, A / Gomes, C L / Messersmith, W A. ·Simon Cancer Center, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis. · University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora. · Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo. · Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia. · Kaiser Permanente, Lone Tree. · University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester. · Oncare Hawaii, Honolulu. · Cone Health Cancer Center, Greensboro. · University of Washington, Seattle. · University of Cincinnati Cancer Institute, Cincinnati. · University of Kansas Medical Center, Westwood. · Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit. · Rex Cancer Center UNC Healthcare, Raleigh. · Carolinas Health Care, Charlotte. · Kaiser Permanante Northwest, Portland. · NYU Clinical Cancer Center, New York. · Hendersonville Hematology and Oncology at Pardee, Hendersonville. · Kaiser Permanante Medical Center, Vallejo. · McLeod Regional Medical Center, Florence. · University of Massachusetts Memorial, Worcester. · UCSD Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla. · Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville. · UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill. · Onconova Therapeutics Inc., Newtown. · Oncology Consortia of Criterium Inc., Saratoga Springs, USA. · University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora wells.messersmith@ucdenver.edu. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26091808.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a first-in-class Ras mimetic and small-molecule inhibitor of multiple signaling pathways including polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), has shown efficacy in preclinical pancreatic cancer models. In this study, rigosertib was assessed in combination with gemcitabine in patients with treatment-naïve metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were randomized in a 2:1 fashion to gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle plus rigosertib 1800 mg/m(2) via 2-h continuous IV infusions given twice weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle (RIG + GEM) versus gemcitabine 1000 mg/m(2) weekly for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle (GEM). RESULTS: A total of 160 patients were enrolled globally and randomly assigned to RIG + GEM (106 patients) or GEM (54). The most common grade 3 or higher adverse events were neutropenia (8% in the RIG + GEM group versus 6% in the GEM group), hyponatremia (17% versus 4%), and anemia (8% versus 4%). The median overall survival was 6.1 months for RIG + GEM versus 6.4 months for GEM [hazard ratio (HR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-1.81]. The median progression-free survival was 3.4 months for both groups (HR = 0.96; 95% CI 0.68-1.36). The partial response rate was 19% versus 13% for RIG + GEM versus GEM, respectively. Of 64 tumor samples sent for molecular analysis, 47 were adequate for multiplex genetic testing and 41 were positive for mutations. The majority of cases had KRAS gene mutations (40 cases). Other mutations detected included TP53 (13 cases) and PIK3CA (1 case). No correlation between mutational status and efficacy was detected. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of RIG + GEM failed to demonstrate an improvement in survival or response compared with GEM in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Rigosertib showed a similar safety profile to that seen in previous trials using the IV formulation.

3 Article Integrative Genomic Analysis of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Distinct IDH-Mutant Molecular Profiles. 2017

Farshidfar, Farshad / Zheng, Siyuan / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Newton, Yulia / Shih, Juliann / Robertson, A Gordon / Hinoue, Toshinori / Hoadley, Katherine A / Gibb, Ewan A / Roszik, Jason / Covington, Kyle R / Wu, Chia-Chin / Shinbrot, Eve / Stransky, Nicolas / Hegde, Apurva / Yang, Ju Dong / Reznik, Ed / Sadeghi, Sara / Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar / Ojesina, Akinyemi I / Hess, Julian M / Auman, J Todd / Rhie, Suhn K / Bowlby, Reanne / Borad, Mitesh J / Anonymous6440899 / Zhu, Andrew X / Stuart, Josh M / Sander, Chris / Akbani, Rehan / Cherniack, Andrew D / Deshpande, Vikram / Mounajjed, Taofic / Foo, Wai Chin / Torbenson, Michael S / Kleiner, David E / Laird, Peter W / Wheeler, David A / McRee, Autumn J / Bathe, Oliver F / Andersen, Jesper B / Bardeesy, Nabeel / Roberts, Lewis R / Kwong, Lawrence N. ·Departments of Surgery and Oncology, Arnie Charbonneau Cancer Institute, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada. · Departments of Genomic Medicine, Melanoma Medical Oncology, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Pathology, and Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · University of California Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215, USA. · Canada's Michael Smith Genome Sciences Centre, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4S6, Canada. · Center for Epigenetics, Van Andel Research Institute, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Blueprint Medicines, 38 Sidney Street, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. · Divisions of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10005, USA. · University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35294, USA; HudsonAlpha Institute for Biotechnology, Huntsville, AL 35806, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L. Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. · Departments of Genetics and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ 85054, USA. · Departments of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. · National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. · Biotech Research and Innovation Centre, Department of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen 2200, Denmark. Electronic address: jesper.andersen@bric.ku.dk. · Departments of Pathology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. Electronic address: bardeesy.nabeel@mgh.harvard.edu. · Divisions of Gastroenterology and Hepatology and Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address: roberts.lewis@mayo.edu. · Departments of Genomic Medicine, Melanoma Medical Oncology, Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Pathology, and Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address: lkwong@mdanderson.org. ·Cell Rep · Pubmed #28297679.

ABSTRACT: Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is an aggressive malignancy of the bile ducts, with poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Here, we describe the integrated analysis of somatic mutations, RNA expression, copy number, and DNA methylation by The Cancer Genome Atlas of a set of predominantly intrahepatic CCA cases and propose a molecular classification scheme. We identified an IDH mutant-enriched subtype with distinct molecular features including low expression of chromatin modifiers, elevated expression of mitochondrial genes, and increased mitochondrial DNA copy number. Leveraging the multi-platform data, we observed that ARID1A exhibited DNA hypermethylation and decreased expression in the IDH mutant subtype. More broadly, we found that IDH mutations are associated with an expanded histological spectrum of liver tumors with molecular features that stratify with CCA. Our studies reveal insights into the molecular pathogenesis and heterogeneity of cholangiocarcinoma and provide classification information of potential therapeutic significance.