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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Amalia Mattiello
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, A. Mattiello wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 2016

Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M / Wark, Petra A / Romaguera, Dora / Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala / Michaud, Dominique / Molina-Montes, Esther / Tjønneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Fagherazzi, Guy / Katzke, Verena A / Kühn, Tilman / Steffen, Annika / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Klinaki, Eleni / Papatesta, Eleni-Maria / Masala, Giovanna / Krogh, Vittorio / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Peeters, Petra H / Rylander, Charlotta / Parr, Christine L / Skeie, Guri / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Travis, Ruth C / Key, Tim / Stepien, Magdalena / Freisling, Heinz / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain; The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Medical Research Institute of Palma, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; mariaadoracion.romaguera@ssib.es. · Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; · Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Andalusian School of Public Health. Biomedical Research Institute of Granada; University Hospital of Granada/Granada University, Granada, Spain; · Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; · Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy; · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit. Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy; · Human Genetics Foundation,Torino, Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Torino, Italy; · Dipartamento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; · Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland; · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain; · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Public Health Direction Biodonostia Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; · Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, and Clinical Gerontology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; · Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·Am J Clin Nutr · Pubmed #27510540.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa. RESULTS: Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results.

2 Article Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2016

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Zamora-Ros, Raul / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Wark, Petra A / Obon-Santacana, Mireia / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Travis, Ruth C / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Krogh, Vittorio / Martorana, Caterina / Masala, Giovanna / Amiano, Pilar / Huerta, José-María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, José-Ramón / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Angell Åsli, Lene / Skeie, Guri / Ericson, Ulrika / Sonestedt, Emily / Peeters, Petra H / Romieu, Isabelle / Scalbert, Augustin / Overvad, Kim / Clemens, Matthias / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Peppa, Eleni / Vidalis, Pavlos / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutroun-Rualt, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Cross, Amanda J / Lu, Yunxia / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios De Granada/Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiología Y Salud Pública, Spain. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, HuGeF-Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Public Health Institute of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Epidemiology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, France. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27184434.

ABSTRACT: Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow-up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95-1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort.

3 Article Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk. 2015

Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Ros, Martine M / Leenders, Max / van Duijnhoven, Franzel J B / Siersema, Peter D / Jansen, Eugene H J M / van Gils, Carla H / Bakker, Marije F / Overvad, Kim / Roswall, Nina / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Racine, Antoine / Cadeau, Claire / Grote, Verena / Kaaks, Rudolf / Aleksandrova, Krasimira / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vasiliki / Valanou, Elisavet / Palli, Domenico / Krogh, Vittorio / Vineis, Paolo / Tumino, Rosario / Mattiello, Amalia / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Skeie, Guri / Castaño, José María Huerta / Duell, Eric J / Barricarte, Aurelio / Molina-Montes, Esther / Argüelles, Marcial / Dorronsoro, Mire / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Crowe, Francesca L / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Jenab, Mazda / Fedirko, Veronika / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands; National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25175624.

ABSTRACT: Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), α- and γ-tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma β-carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend = 0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend = 0.06) and α-tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend = 0.08. For α- and β-carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and γ-tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted.

4 Article Dietary intake of acrylamide and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2013

Obón-Santacana, M / Slimani, N / Lujan-Barroso, L / Travier, N / Hallmans, G / Freisling, H / Ferrari, P / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Racine, A / Clavel, F / Saieva, C / Pala, V / Tumino, R / Mattiello, A / Vineis, P / Argüelles, M / Ardanaz, E / Amiano, P / Navarro, C / Sánchez, M J / Molina Montes, E / Key, T / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Peeters, P H / Trichopoulou, A / Bamia, C / Trichopoulos, D / Boeing, H / Kaaks, R / Katzke, V / Ye, W / Sund, M / Ericson, U / Wirfält, E / Overvad, K / Tjønneland, A / Olsen, A / Skeie, G / Åsli, L A / Weiderpass, E / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Duell, E J. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23857962.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In 1994, acrylamide (AA) was classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In 2002, AA was discovered at relatively high concentrations in some starchy, plant-based foods cooked at high temperatures. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A prospective analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between the dietary intake of AA and ductal adenocarcinoma of the exocrine pancreatic cancer (PC) risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort using Cox regression modeling. EPIC includes >500,000 men and women aged 35-75 at enrollment from 10 European countries. AA intake was estimated for each participant by combining questionnaire-based food consumption data with a harmonized AA database derived from the EU monitoring database of AA levels in foods, and evaluated in quintiles and continuously. RESULTS: After a mean follow-up of 11 years, 865 first incident adenocarcinomas of the exocrine pancreas were observed and included in the present analysis. At baseline, the mean dietary AA intake in EPIC was 26.22 µg/day. No overall association was found between continuous or quintiles of dietary AA intake and PC risk in EPIC (HR:0.95, 95%CI:0.89-1.01 per 10 µg/day). There was no effect measure modification by smoking status, sex, diabetes, alcohol intake or geographic region. However, there was an inverse association (HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.61-0.88 per 10 µg/day) between AA intake and PC risk in obese persons as defined using the body mass index (BMI, ≥ 30 kg/m(2)), but not when body fatness was defined using waist and hip circumference or their ratio. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary intake of AA was not associated with an increased risk of PC in the EPIC cohort.

5 Article Dietary intake of iron, heme-iron and magnesium and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2012

Molina-Montes, Esther / Wark, Petra A / Sánchez, María-José / Norat, Teresa / Jakszyn, Paula / Luján-Barroso, Leila / Michaud, Dominique S / Crowe, Francesca / Allen, Naomi / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Adarakis, George / Katarachia, Helen / Skeie, Guri / Henningsen, Maria / Broderstad, Ann Ragnhild / Berrino, Franco / Tumino, Rosario / Palli, Domenico / Mattiello, Amalia / Vineis, Paolo / Amiano, Pilar / Barricarte, Aurelio / Huerta, José-María / Duell, Eric J / Quirós, José-Ramón / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Overvad, Kim / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Li, Kuanrong / Grote, Verena A / Steffen, Annika / Boeing, Heiner / Racine, Antoine / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Carbonnel, Franck / Peeters, Petra H M / Siersema, Peter D / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas. ·Andalusian School of Public Health. Granada Cancer Registry, Spain. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #22438075.

ABSTRACT: Several studies support a protective effect of dietary magnesium against type 2 diabetes, but a harmful effect for iron. As diabetes has been linked to pancreatic cancer, intake of these nutrients may be also associated with this cancer. We examined the association between dietary intake of magnesium, total iron and heme-iron and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. In total, 142,203 men and 334,999 women, recruited between 1992 and 2000, were included. After an average follow-up of 11.3 years, 396 men and 469 women developed exocrine pancreatic cancer. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained using Cox regression stratified by age and center, and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, height, weight, and self-reported diabetes status. Neither intake of magnesium, total iron nor heme-iron was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. In stratified analyses, a borderline inverse association was observed among overweight men (body mass index, ≥ 25 kg/m(2) ) with magnesium (HR(per 100 mg/day increase) = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.63-1.01) although this was less apparent using calibrated intake. In female smokers, a higher intake of heme-iron was associated with a higher pancreatic cancer risk (HR (per 1 mg/day increase) = 1.38, 95% CI = 1.10-1.74). After calibration, this risk increased significantly to 2.5-fold (95% CI = 1.22-5.28). Overall, dietary magnesium, total iron and heme-iron were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk during the follow-up period. Our observation that heme-iron was associated with increased pancreatic cancer risk in female smokers warrants replication in additional study populations.

6 Article Concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2012

Rohrmann, S / Grote, V A / Becker, S / Rinaldi, S / Tjønneland, A / Roswall, N / Grønbæk, H / Overvad, K / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Boeing, H / Drogan, D / Dilis, V / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Tagliabue, G / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Mattiello, A / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J-M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S / Peeters, P H M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Sund, M / Ye, W / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N J / Allen, N E / Crowe, F L / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Norat, T / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zürich 8001, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@ifspm.uzh.ch ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22315049.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. METHODS: Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables. RESULTS: Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154). CONCLUSION: On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.

7 Article The associations of advanced glycation end products and its soluble receptor with pancreatic cancer risk: a case-control study within the prospective EPIC Cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Nieters, Alexandra / Kaaks, Rudolf / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Overvad, Kim / Nielsen, Michael R Skjelbo / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine / Racine, Antoine / Teucher, Birgit / Lukanova, Annekatrin / Boeing, Heiner / Drogan, Dagmar / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Lagiou, Pagona / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles Suárez, Marcial Vicente / Duell, Eric J / Sánchez, María-José / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta Castaño, José María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra H M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Regner, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Rohrmann, Sabine. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology c020, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #22301828.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Advanced glycation end products (AGE) and their receptors (RAGE) have been implicated in cancer development through their proinflammatory capabilities. However, prospective data on their association with cancer of specific sites, including pancreatic cancer, are limited. METHODS: Prediagnostic blood levels of the AGE product Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) and the endogenous secreted receptor for AGE (esRAGE) were measured using ELISA in 454 patients with exocrine pancreatic cancer and individually matched controls within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Pancreatic cancer risk was estimated by calculating ORs with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Elevated CML levels tended to be associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [OR = 0.57 (95% CI, 0.32-1.01) comparing highest with lowest quintile), whereas no association was observed for esRAGE (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.62-1.54). Adjustments for body mass index and smoking attenuated the inverse associations of CML with pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.78; 95% CI, 0.41-1.49). There was an inverse association between esRAGE and risk of pancreatic cancer for cases that were diagnosed within the first 2 years of follow-up [OR = 0.46 (95% CI, 0.22-0.96) for a doubling in concentration], whereas there was no association among those with a longer follow-up (OR = 1.11; 95% CI, 0.88-1.39; P(interaction) = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS AND IMPACT: Our results do not provide evidence for an association of higher CML or lower esRAGE levels with risk of pancreatic cancer. The role of AGE/RAGE in pancreatic cancer would benefit from further investigations.

8 Article Plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer in the EPIC cohort study. 2012

Leenders, Max / Chuang, Shu-Chun / Dahm, Christina C / Overvad, Kim / Ueland, Per Magne / Midttun, Oivind / Vollset, Stein Emil / Tjønneland, Anne / Halkjaer, Jytte / Jenab, Mazda / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Kaaks, Rudolf / Canzian, Federico / Boeing, Heiner / Weikert, Cornelia / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Bamia, Christina / Naska, Androniki / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Mattiello, Amalia / Tumino, Rosario / Sacerdote, Carlotta / van Duijnhoven, Fränzel J B / Peeters, Petra H M / van Gils, Carla H / Lund, Eiliv / Rodriguez, Laudina / Duell, Eric J / Pérez, María-José Sánchez / Molina-Montes, Esther / Castaño, José María Huerta / Barricarte, Aurelio / Larrañaga, Nerea / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas J / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Xun, Wei W / Allen, Naomi E / Crowe, Francesca L / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vineis, Paolo. ·School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. m.leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21953524.

ABSTRACT: Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer, previously investigated by the means of questionnaires. Using cotinine as a biomarker for tobacco exposure allows more accurate quantitative analyses to be performed. This study on pancreatic cancer, nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC cohort), included 146 cases and 146 matched controls. Using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, plasma cotinine levels were analyzed on average 8.0 years before cancer onset (5-95% range: 2.8-12.0 years). The relation between plasma cotinine levels and pancreatic cancer was analyzed with conditional logistic regression for different levels of cotinine in a population of never and current smokers. This was also done for the self-reported number of smoked cigarettes per day at baseline. Every increase of 350 nmol/L of plasma cotinine was found to significantly elevate risk of pancreatic cancer [odds ratio (OR): 1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.60]. People with a cotinine level over 1187.8 nmol/L, a level comparable to smoking 17 cigarettes per day, have an elevated risk of pancreatic cancer, compared to people with cotinine levels below 55 nmol/L (OR: 3.66, 95% CI: 1.44-9.26). The results for self-reported smoking at baseline also show an increased risk of pancreatic cancer from cigarette smoking based on questionnaire information. People who smoke more than 30 cigarettes per day showed the highest risk compared to never smokers (OR: 4.15, 95% CI: 1.02-16.42). This study is the first to show that plasma cotinine levels are strongly related to pancreatic cancer.

9 Article The association of circulating adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk: a study within the prospective EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, Verena A / Rohrmann, Sabine / Dossus, Laure / Nieters, Alexandra / Halkjaer, Jytte / Tjønneland, Anne / Overvad, Kim / Stegger, Jakob / Chabbert-Buffet, Nathalie / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Teucher, Birgit / Becker, Susen / Montonen, Jukka / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Palli, Domenico / Sieri, Sabina / Tumino, Rosario / Vineis, Paolo / Mattiello, Amalia / Argüelles, Marcial / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Larrañaga, Nerea / Chirlaque, María-Dolores / Gurrea, Aurelio Barricarte / Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Peeters, Petra Hm / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Crowe, Francesca L / Romieu, Isabelle / Rinaldi, Sabina / Jenab, Mazda / Romaguera, Dora / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #21681743.

ABSTRACT: Excess body weight and type 2 diabetes mellitus, risk factors of pancreatic cancer, are characterized by decreased levels of adiponectin. In addition to anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative actions, adiponectin has an important role in regulating glucose metabolism, i.e., decreasing circulating blood glucose levels. Prospectively, hyperglycemia has been associated with risk of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of pre-diagnostic adiponectin levels with pancreatic cancer risk. We conducted a case-control study nested within European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Blood samples of 452 pancreatic cancer cases and 452 individually matched controls were analyzed by immunoassays. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Overall, adiponectin showed no association with pancreas cancer risk; however, among never smokers, higher circulating levels of adiponectin were associated with a reduction in pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23-0.82] for highest vs. lowest quartile), whereas among current smokers there was no significant association (OR = 1.59 [95% CI 0.67-3.76] for highest vs. lowest quartile; p-trend = 0.530; p-interaction = 0.309). In our study, lower adiponectin concentrations may be associated with the development of pancreatic cancer among never smokers, whereas the only other prospective study being conducted so far showed a decrease in risk among male smokers. Therefore, further studies are needed to clarify the role of adiponectin in pancreatic cancer development.

10 Article No association between educational level and pancreatic cancer incidence in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2010

van Boeckel, Petra G A / Boshuizen, Hendriek C / Siersema, Peter D / Vrieling, Alina / Kunst, Anton E / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Michaud, Dominique S / Gallo, Valentina / Spencer, Elizabeth A / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vasiliki / Orfanos, Philippos / Cirera, Lluis / Duell, Eric J / Rohrmann, Sabine / Hemann, Silke / Masala, Giovanni / Manjer, Jonas / Mattiello, Amalia / Lindkvist, Bjorn / Sánchez, María-José / Pala, Valeria / Peeters, Petra H M / Braaten, Tonje / Tjonneland, Anne / Dalton, Susanne Oksbjerg / Larranaga, Nerea / Dorronsoro, Miren / Overvad, Kim / Illner, Anne-Kathrin / Ardanaz, Eva / Marron, M / Straif, K / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, B. ·National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. p.g.a.vanboeckel@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Epidemiol · Pubmed #20829145.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Until now, studies examining the relationship between socioeconomic status and pancreatic cancer incidence have been inconclusive. AIM: To prospectively investigate to what extent pancreatic cancer incidence varies according to educational level within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. METHODS: In the EPIC study, socioeconomic status at baseline was measured using the highest level of education attained. Hazard ratios by educational level and a summary index, the relative indices of inequality (RII), were estimated using Cox regression models stratified by age, gender, and center and adjusted for known risk factors. In addition, we conducted separate analyses by age, gender and geographical region. RESULTS: Within the source population of 407, 944 individuals at baseline, 490 first incident primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases were identified in 9 European countries. The crude difference in risk of pancreatic cancer according to level of education was small and not statistically significant (RII=1.14, 95% CI 0.80-1.62). Adjustment for known risk factors reduced the inequality estimates to only a small extent. In addition, no statistically significant associations were observed for age groups (adjusted RII(≤ 60 years)=0.85, 95% CI 0.44-1.64, adjusted RII(>60 years)=1.18, 95% CI 0.73-1.90), gender (adjusted RII(male)=1.20, 95% CI 0.68-2.10, adjusted RII(female)=0.96, 95% CI 0.56-1.62) or geographical region (adjusted RII(Northern Europe)=1.14, 95% CI 0.81-1.61, adjusted RII(Middle Europe)=1.72, 95% CI 0.93-3.19, adjusted RII(Southern Europe)=0.75, 95% CI 0.32-1.80). CONCLUSION: Despite large educational inequalities in many risk factors within the EPIC study, we found no evidence for an association between educational level and the risk of developing pancreatic cancer in this European cohort.