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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Séverine Martinez
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Séverine Martinez wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study. 2016

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Gomez-Panzani, Edda / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1290854. ·Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France m.caplin@ucl.ac.uk. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #26743120.

ABSTRACT: In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs.

2 Clinical Trial Lanreotide in metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Blumberg, Joëlle / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1240800. ·From Royal Free Hospital, London (M.E.C.) · Charité University Medicine Berlin, Berlin (M.P.) · University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland (J.B.Ć.) · University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston (A.T.P.) · University Hospital, Vienna (M.R.) · Department of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic (E.S.) · Robert-Debré Hospital, Reims (G.C.), Ipsen, Les Ulis, (A.L., S.M., J.B.), Beaujon Hospital, Clichy (P.R.), and Paris Diderot University, Paris (P.R.) - all in France · Samuel Oschin Cancer Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles (E.M.W.) · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona (J.C.) · Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (L.W.) · and Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Rome (G.R.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #25014687.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Somatostatin analogues are commonly used to treat symptoms associated with hormone hypersecretion in neuroendocrine tumors; however, data on their antitumor effects are limited. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multinational study of the somatostatin analogue lanreotide in patients with advanced, well-differentiated or moderately differentiated, nonfunctioning, somatostatin receptor-positive neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (a tumor proliferation index [on staining for the Ki-67 antigen] of <10%) and documented disease-progression status. The tumors originated in the pancreas, midgut, or hindgut or were of unknown origin. Patients were randomly assigned to receive an extended-release aqueous-gel formulation of lanreotide (Autogel [known in the United States as Depot], Ipsen) at a dose of 120 mg (101 patients) or placebo (103 patients) once every 28 days for 96 weeks. The primary end point was progression-free survival, defined as the time to disease progression (according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0) or death. Secondary end points included overall survival, quality of life (assessed with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer questionnaires QLQ-C30 and QLQ-GI.NET21), and safety. RESULTS: Most patients (96%) had no tumor progression in the 3 to 6 months before randomization, and 33% had hepatic tumor volumes greater than 25%. Lanreotide, as compared with placebo, was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival (median not reached vs. median of 18.0 months, P<0.001 by the stratified log-rank test; hazard ratio for progression or death, 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.30 to 0.73). The estimated rates of progression-free survival at 24 months were 65.1% (95% CI, 54.0 to 74.1) in the lanreotide group and 33.0% (95% CI, 23.0 to 43.3) in the placebo group. The therapeutic effect in predefined subgroups was generally consistent with that in the overall population, with the exception of small subgroups in which confidence intervals were wide. There were no significant between-group differences in quality of life or overall survival. The most common treatment-related adverse event was diarrhea (in 26% of the patients in the lanreotide group and 9% of those in the placebo group). CONCLUSIONS: Lanreotide was associated with significantly prolonged progression-free survival among patients with metastatic enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors of grade 1 or 2 (Ki-67 <10%). (Funded by Ipsen; CLARINET ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00353496; EudraCT 2005-004904-35.).