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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Harvey J. Mamon
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, H. Mamon wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: conceptual evolution and current approach to image-based classification. 2017

Gilbert, J W / Wolpin, B / Clancy, T / Wang, J / Mamon, H / Shinagare, A B / Jagannathan, J / Rosenthal, M. ·Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. · Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital. · Harvard Medical School. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital. · Gastrointestinal Surgical Center, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28407088.

ABSTRACT: Background: Diagnostic imaging plays a critical role in the initial diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Over the past decade, the concept of 'borderline resectable' pancreatic cancer has emerged to describe a distinct subset of patients existing along the spectrum from resectable to locally advanced disease for whom a microscopically margin-positive (R1) resection is considered relatively more likely, primarily due to the relationship of the primary tumor with surrounding vasculature. Materials and methods: This review traces the conceptual evolution of borderline resectability from a radiological perspective, including the debates over the key imaging criteria that define the thresholds between resectable, borderline resectable, and locally advanced or metastatic disease. This review also addresses the data supporting neoadjuvant therapy in this population and discusses current imaging practices before and during treatment. Results: A growing body of evidence suggests that the borderline resectable group of patients may particularly benefit from neoadjuvant therapy to increase the likelihood of an ultimately margin-negative (R0) resection. Unfortunately, anatomic and imaging criteria to define borderline resectability are not yet universally agreed upon, with several classification systems proposed in the literature and considerable variance in institution-by-institution practice. As a result of this lack of consensus, as well as overall small patient numbers and lack of established clinical trials dedicated to borderline resectable patients, accurate evidence-based diagnostic categorization and treatment selection for this subset of patients remains a significant challenge. Conclusions: Clinicians and radiologists alike should be cognizant of evolving imaging criteria for borderline resectability given their profound implications for treatment strategy, follow-up recommendations, and prognosis.

2 Review Chemoradiation therapy: localized esophageal, gastric, and pancreatic cancer. 2013

Pretz, Jennifer L / Wo, Jennifer Y / Mamon, Harvey J / Kachnic, Lisa A / Hong, Theodore S. ·Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·Surg Oncol Clin N Am · Pubmed #23622077.

ABSTRACT: Chemoradiation plays an important role in management of locally advanced gastrointestinal tumors. This article reviews data regarding chemoradiation for tumors of the upper gastrointestinal tract. For esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancers, chemoradiation is standard of care in the preoperative setting. In gastric cancer, 2 standards have emerged: definitively treating with perioperative chemotherapy alone and using chemoradiation postoperatively. For pancreatic cancer, the benefit of radiation is less well defined. The future of treatment sites lies in trials evaluating new chemotherapy regimens, alternative systemic therapies, and different radiation fractionation schema. Because care of these patients is complex, multimodality team evaluation before treatment is encouraged.

3 Clinical Trial A phase 1/2 and biomarker study of preoperative short course chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery for resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2014

Hong, Theodore S / Ryan, David P / Borger, Darrell R / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Yeap, Beow Y / Ancukiewicz, Marek / Deshpande, Vikram / Shinagare, Shweta / Wo, Jennifer Y / Boucher, Yves / Wadlow, Raymond C / Kwak, Eunice L / Allen, Jill N / Clark, Jeffrey W / Zhu, Andrew X / Ferrone, Cristina R / Mamon, Harvey J / Adams, Judith / Winrich, Barbara / Grillo, Tarin / Jain, Rakesh K / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Duda, Dan G. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: tshong1@partners.org. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #24867540.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety, efficacy and biomarkers of short-course proton beam radiation and capecitabine, followed by pancreaticoduodenectomy in a phase 1/2 study in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with radiographically resectable, biopsy-proven PDAC were treated with neoadjuvant short-course (2-week) proton-based radiation with capecitabine, followed by surgery and adjuvant gemcitabine. The primary objective was to demonstrate a rate of toxicity grade ≥ 3 of <20%. Exploratory biomarker studies were performed using surgical specimen tissues and peripheral blood. RESULTS: The phase 2 dose was established at 5 daily doses of 5 GyE. Fifty patients were enrolled, of whom 35 patients were treated in the phase 2 portion. There were no grade 4 or 5 toxicities, and only 2 of 35 patients (4.1%) experienced a grade 3 toxicity event (chest wall pain grade 1, colitis grade 1). Of 48 patients eligible for analysis, 37 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy. Thirty of 37 (81%) had positive nodes. Locoregional failure occurred in 6 of 37 resected patients (16.2%), and distant recurrence occurred in 35 of 48 patients (72.9%). With median follow-up of 38 months, the median progression-free survival for the entire group was 10 months, and overall survival was 17 months. Biomarker studies showed significant associations between worse survival outcomes and the KRAS point mutation change from glycine to aspartic acid at position 12, stromal CXCR7 expression, and circulating biomarkers CEA, CA19-9, and HGF (all, P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: This study met the primary endpoint by showing a rate of 4.1% grade 3 toxicity for neoadjuvant short-course proton-based chemoradiation. Treatment was associated with favorable local control. In exploratory analyses, KRAS(G12D) status and high CXCR7 expression and circulating CEA, CA19-9, and HGF levels were associated with poor survival.

4 Clinical Trial Phase II and pharmacodynamic study of autophagy inhibition using hydroxychloroquine in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rubinson, Douglas A / Wang, Xiaoxu / Chan, Jennifer A / Cleary, James M / Enzinger, Peter C / Fuchs, Charles S / McCleary, Nadine J / Meyerhardt, Jeffrey A / Ng, Kimmie / Schrag, Deborah / Sikora, Allison L / Spicer, Beverly A / Killion, Leah / Mamon, Harvey / Kimmelman, Alec C. ·Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA akimmelman@partners.org bwolpin@partners.org. · Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #24821822.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Autophagy is a catabolic pathway that permits cells to recycle intracellular macromolecules, and its inhibition reduces pancreatic cancer growth in model systems. We evaluated hydoxychloroquine (HCQ), an inhibitor of autophagy, in patients with pancreatic cancer and analyzed pharmacodynamic markers in treated patients and mice. METHODS: Patients with previously treated metastatic pancreatic cancer were administered HCQ at 400 mg (n = 10) or 600 mg (n = 10) twice daily. The primary endpoint was 2-month progression-free survival (PFS). We analyzed peripheral lymphocytes from treated mice to identify pharmacodynamic markers of autophagy inhibition that were then assessed in peripheral lymphocytes from patients. RESULTS: Among 20 patients enrolled, 2 (10%) were without progressive disease at 2 months. Median PFS and overall survival were 46.5 and 69.0 days, respectively. Treatment-related grade 3/4 adverse events were lymphopenia (n = 1) and elevated alanine aminotransferase (n = 1). Tolerability and efficacy were similar at the two dose levels. Analysis of treated murine lymphocytes suggested that LC3-II expression by Western blot is a reliable marker for autophagy inhibition. Analysis of LC3-II in patient lymphocytes demonstrated inconsistent autophagy inhibition. CONCLUSION: Mouse studies identified LC3-II levels in peripheral lymphocytes as a potential pharmacodynamic marker of autophagy inhibition. In patients with previously treated metastatic pancreatic cancer, HCQ monotherapy achieved inconsistent autophagy inhibition and demonstrated negligible therapeutic efficacy.

5 Clinical Trial Phase I study of neoadjuvant accelerated short course radiation therapy with photons and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wo, Jennifer Y / Mamon, Harvey J / Ferrone, Cristina R / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Kwak, Eunice L / Tseng, Yolanda D / Napolitano, Brian N / Ancukiewicz, Marek / Swanson, Richard S / Lillemoe, Keith D / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. Electronic address: jwo@partners.org. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, United States. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. · Department of General Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States. ·Radiother Oncol · Pubmed #24231241.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: In this phase I study, we sought to determine the feasibility and tolerability of neoadjuvant short course radiotherapy (SC-CRT) delivered with photon RT with concurrent capecitabine for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ten patients with localized, resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled from December 2009 to August 2011. In dose level I, patients received 3 Gy × 10. In dose level 2, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (every other day). In dose level 3, patients received 5 Gy × 5 (consecutive days). Capecitabine was given during weeks 1 and 2. Surgery was performed 1-3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy. RESULTS: With an intended accrual of 12 patients, the study was closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications. Compared to the companion phase I proton study, patients treated with photons had increased intraoperative RT fibrosis reported by surgeons (27% vs. 63%). Among those undergoing a Whipple resection, increased RT fibrosis translated to an increased mean OR time of 69 min. Dosimetric comparison revealed significantly increased low dose exposure to organs at risk for patients treated with photon RT. CONCLUSIONS: This phase I experience evaluating the tolerability of neoadjuvant SC-CRT with photon RT closed early due to unexpected intraoperative complications.

6 Clinical Trial A phase 2 trial of gemcitabine, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation therapy in locally advanced nonmetastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma : cancer and Leukemia Group B (CALGB) 80003. 2011

Mamon, Harvey J / Niedzwiecki, Donna / Hollis, Donna / Tan, Benjamin R / Mayer, Robert J / Tepper, Joel E / Goldberg, Richard M / Blackstock, A William / Fuchs, Charles S / Anonymous7500697. ·Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts; Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. hmamon@lroc.harvard.edu ·Cancer · Pubmed #21656739.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and gemcitabine administered concurrently with radiation in patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Eligible patients had histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma deemed locally unresectable without evidence of metastatic disease. In addition, all patients underwent laparoscopy or laparotomy before study entry to rule out peritoneal carcinomatosis. Patients received radiation therapy (50.4 Gy) with concurrent infusional 5FU (200 mg/m(2) 5 days/week) and weekly gemcitabine (200 mg/m(2) ). After a 3-week break, patients received weekly gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m(2) for 3 of 4 weeks, for 4 cycles. The primary endpoint of the trial was the proportion of patients surviving 9 months from study entry. Secondary endpoints included objective tumor response, CA19-9 response, overall survival (OS) time to progression (TTP), and toxicity. RESULTS: Between November 2001 and October 2004, 81 patients were enrolled, 78 of whom were eligible for analysis. With a median follow-up of 55.2 months, the median OS was 12.2 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.9-14.9) and the median TTP was 10 months (95% CI, 6.4-12.0). An objective tumor response was seen in 19 patients (25%), and among 56 patients with an elevated CA19-9 at baseline, 29 (52%) had a sustained CA19-9 response. Overall, 41% of patients had grade 3 or greater treatment-related gastrointestinal adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of 5FU, gemcitabine, and radiation is well tolerated. Survival is comparable with the best results of other recent studies of 5FU and radiation or gemcitabine and radiation.

7 Clinical Trial Phase I study of preoperative short-course chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine for resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma of the head. 2011

Hong, Theodore S / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Mamon, Harvey J / Kwak, Eunice L / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Adams, Judith / Yeap, Beow / Winrich, Barbara / DeLaney, Thomas F / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114, USA. tshong1@partners.org ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #20421151.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To evaluate the safety of 1 week of chemoradiation with proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Fifteen patients with localized resectable, pancreatic adenocarcinoma of the head were enrolled from May 2006 to September 2008. Patients received radiation with proton beam. In dose level 1, patients received 3 GyE × 10 (Week 1, Monday-Friday; Week 2, Monday-Friday). Patients in Dose Levels 2 to 4 received 5 GyE × 5 in progressively shortened schedules: level 2 (Week 1, Monday, Wednesday, and Friday; Week 2, Tuesday and Thursday), Level 3 (Week 1, Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday; Week 2, Monday), Level 4 (Week 1, Monday through Friday). Capecitabine was given as 825 mg/m(2) b.i.d. Weeks 1 and 2 Monday through Friday for a total of 10 days in all dose levels. Surgery was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemotherapy for Dose Levels 1 to 3 and then after 1 to 3 weeks for Dose Level 4. RESULTS: Three patients were treated at Dose Levels 1 to 3 and 6 patients at Dose Level 4, which was selected as the MTD. No dose limiting toxicities were observed. Grade 3 toxicity was noted in 4 patients (pain in 1; stent obstruction or infection in 3). Eleven patients underwent resection. Reasons for no resection were metastatic disease (3 patients) and unresectable tumor (1 patient). Mean postsurgical length of stay was 6 days (range, 5-10 days). No unexpected 30-day postoperative complications, including leak or obstruction, were found. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative chemoradiation with 1 week of proton beam therapy and capecitabine followed by early surgery is feasible. A Phase II study is underway.

8 Article Association Between Very Small Tumor Size and Decreased Overall Survival in Node-Positive Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Muralidhar, Vinayak / Nipp, Ryan D / Mamon, Harvey J / Punglia, Rinaa S / Hong, Theodore S / Ferrone, Cristina / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Parikh, Aparna / Nguyen, Paul L / Wo, Jennifer Y. ·Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. jwo@mgh.harvard.edu. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30298331.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC), increasing tumor size usually correlates with a worse prognosis. However, patients with a very small primary tumor who experience lymph node involvement may have a different disease biology. This study sought to determine the interaction between tumor size and lymph node involvement in terms of overall survival (OS). METHODS: The study identified 17,073 patients with a diagnosis of M0 resected PDAC between 1983 and 2013 using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. The patients were stratified by lymph node involvement (N0 vs N+) and T stage (T1a-T1b vs T1c vs T2 vs T3 vs T4). The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate OS, and Cox regression analysis was used to compare survival between subgroups after adjustment for patient-specific factors. RESULTS: Lymph node involvement and T stage significantly interacted (p < 0.001). Among the patients with node-negative disease, 5-year OS decreased monotonically with increasing T stage (59.1%, 30.6%, 22.9%, 16.6%, and 8.0%, respectively; p < 0.001). In contrast, among the patients with node-positive disease, those with T1a-T1b tumors (< 10 mm) had worse 5-year OS than those with T1c tumors (7.4% vs 17.6%; adjusted hazard ratio, 0.70; 95% confidence interval, 0.50-0.97; p = 0.034) and similar survival compared with those who had T2, T3, or T4 tumors (9.7%, 8.2%, and 4.8%, respectively; p > 0.2 in all cases). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with lymph node-positive PDAC, very small primary tumors are associated with decreased OS. This finding raises the possibility that small tumors capable of lymph node metastasis might represent more biologically aggressive cancers.

9 Article Pilot study on the impact of F18-labeled thymidine PET/CT on gross tumor volume identification and definition for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Pretz, Jennifer L / Blake, Michael A / Killoran, Joseph H / Mamon, Harvey J / Wo, Jennifer Y / Zhu, Andrew X / Hong, Theodore S. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jpretz@partners.org. · Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham & Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Pract Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #29042120.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Accurate target definition for radiation therapy planning in localized pancreatic cancer is critical, particularly when using strategies that omit elective coverage. Standard imaging modalities such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and endoscopic ultrasound have limited concordance with pathologic evaluation. Biologic imaging with [F18]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET) can also be difficult to interpret because increased activity is indicative of increased glucose metabolism, rather than cellular proliferation. [F18]-3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine labeled thymidine (FLT) is a proliferative marker which exploits the expression of pyrimidine-metabolizing enzymes. We evaluate the impact of FLT-PET on pancreatic target definition for radiation planning. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients with biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed, untreated pancreatic adenocarcinoma were enrolled on an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients were injected with FLT and scanned 20 to 30 minutes later. Two physicians (referred to as observer 1 and observer 2) independently contoured the gross tumor volume (GTV) and involved nodes on CT scan only and then again with the assistance of coregistered FLT-PET. Conformality index (CI), the ratio of the volumes of intersection and union, was used as the metric for volume comparison (where CI = 0 represents no overlap and CI = 1 represents perfect overlap). RESULTS: Nine patients were enrolled in this study. FLT-avidity was discerned in 8 of 9 patients. Average CT-GTV volume for observers 1 and 2 was 38.1 and 26.5 mL, respectively. Average FLT-GTV volume for observers 1 and 2 was 39.1 and 25.0 mL, respectively. For the 8 patients with FLT-avid tumors, addition of FLT data improved concordance of GTV definition between physicians in 6 of 8 tumors. Average CI for interobserver CT-GTV was 0.325. Addition of FLT-PET information improved the average CI to 0.400. CONCLUSIONS: FLT-PET improves interobserver concordance in GTV definition. Further studies will focus on verification of these findings, pathologic verification of the FLT-PET signal, and optimization of the FLT-PET signal threshold for autosegmentation.

10 Article Delaying chemoradiation until after completion of adjuvant chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer may not impact local control. 2014

Wo, Jennifer Y / Childs, Stephanie K / Szymonifka, Jackie / Mamon, Harvey J / Ryan, David P / Blaszkowsky, Lawrence S / Kwak, Eunice L / Ferrone, Cristina R / Allen, Jill N / Zhu, Andrew X / Wolpin, Brian M / Chan, Jennifer A / Abrams, Thomas A / McCleary, Nadine J / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Electronic address: jwo@partners.org. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of General Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. ·Pract Radiat Oncol · Pubmed #24890357.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Timing of administration of adjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) for pancreatic cancer has varied across studies. To date, the impact of timing of adjuvant CRT on long-term outcomes has not been evaluated. This study evaluates the effect of timing of adjuvant CRT on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We performed a review of 159 patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma who received adjuvant CRT between 1998 and 2010. Median dose of CRT was 50.4 Gy. The primary study variable was timing of CRT, dichotomized as immediate CRT versus delayed CRT. Consistent with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9704, immediate chemoradiation was defined as after ≤1 cycle of chemotherapy, whereas delayed CRT was defined as after >1 cycle. Cox multivariate analysis (MVA) was performed. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 55 months. Seventy-four percent of patients received immediate CRT, and 26% patients received delayed CRT. Patients treated with delayed CRT were more likely to receive adjuvant gemcitabine (100% vs 53%; P < .001). Timing of adjuvant CRT was not associated with LRC or OS on univariate or MVA. Preoperative carcinoembryonic antigen ≥1.3 ng/mL (hazard ratio, 3.18; P = .017) and positive margins (hazard ratio, 5.35; P < .001) were associated with lower rates LRC on MVA. Higher lymph node positivity ratio and not receiving adjuvant gemcitabine were independently associated with worse OS. CONCLUSIONS: Timing of adjuvant CRT for resectable pancreatic cancer may not significantly affect LRC or OS. These findings support the ongoing RTOG 0848 trial design, and provide reassurance that delaying CRT until completion of chemotherapy should not significantly impact LRC.

11 Article Pancreatic cancer tumor size on CT scan versus pathologic specimen: implications for radiation treatment planning. 2011

Arvold, Nils D / Niemierko, Andrzej / Mamon, Harvey J / Fernandez-del Castillo, Carlos / Hong, Theodore S. ·Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA, USA. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #20708856.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Pancreatic cancer primary tumor size measurements are often discordant between computed tomography (CT) and pathologic specimen after resection. Dimensions of the primary tumor are increasingly relevant in an era of highly conformal radiotherapy. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We retrospectively evaluated 97 consecutive patients with resected pancreatic cancer at two Boston hospitals. All patients had CT scans before surgical resection. Primary endpoints were maximum dimension (in millimeters) of the primary tumor in any direction as reported by the radiologist on CT and by the pathologist for the resected gross fresh specimen. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) findings were analyzed if available. RESULTS: Of the patients, 87 (90%) had preoperative CT scans available for review and 46 (47%) had EUS. Among proximal tumors (n = 69), 40 (58%) had pathologic duodenal invasion, which was seen on CT in only 3 cases. The pathologic tumor size was a median of 7 mm larger compared with CT size for the same patient (range, -15 to 43 mm; p < 0.0001), with 73 patients (84%) having a primary tumor larger on pathology than CT. Endoscopic ultrasound was somewhat more accurate, with pathologic tumor size being a median of only 5 mm larger compared with EUS size (range, -15 to 35 mm; p = 0.0003). CONCLUSIONS: Computed tomography scans significantly under-represent pancreatic cancer tumor size compared with pathologic specimens in resectable cases. We propose a clinical target volume expansion formula for the primary tumor based on our data. The high rate of pathologic duodenal invasion suggests a risk of duodenal under-coverage with highly conformal radiotherapy.

12 Minor Assessment of the Utility of Laparoscopy and Peritoneal Cytology in the Staging of Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Mihalcik, Stephen A / Virani, Sophia / Hong, Theodore S / Niemierko, Andrzej / Mino-Kenudson, Mari / Kobayashi, Wendy K / Fernández-Del Castillo, Carlos / Mamon, Harvey J. ·Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA smihalcik@partners.orgDepartment of Radiation Oncology, Kaiser Permanente Oakland Medical Center, Oakland, CADepartment of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MADepartment of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MADepartment of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MADepartment of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MADepartment of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28697144.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

13 Minor Reply to the letter to the editor 'Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: an evolving concept' by Petrucciani et al. 2017

Gilbert, J W / Wolpin, B / Clancy, T / Wang, J / Mamon, H / Shinagare, A B / Jagannathan, J / Rosenthal, M. ·Department of Imaging, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Department of Radiology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston. · Harvard Medical School, Boston. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Gastrointestinal Surgical Center, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28541392.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --