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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Hiroyuki Maguchi
Based on 41 articles published since 2009
(Why 41 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, H. Maguchi wrote the following 41 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Needle Tract Seeding: An Overlooked Rare Complication of Endoscopic Ultrasound-Guided Fine-Needle Aspiration. 2017

Minaga, Kosuke / Takenaka, Mamoru / Katanuma, Akio / Kitano, Masayuki / Yamashita, Yukitaka / Kamata, Ken / Yamao, Kentaro / Watanabe, Tomohiro / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Kudo, Masatoshi. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kindai University Faculty of Medicine, Osaka-Sayama, Japan. ·Oncology · Pubmed #29258068.

ABSTRACT: Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been widely used for diagnosis of both inflammatory and tumor lesions located in and adjacent to the gastrointestinal tract. EUS-FNA has been considered to be a safe technique with few complications, as shown in recent review articles in which EUS-FNA-related morbidity and mortality rates were reported to be <1%. It should be noted, however, that needle tract seeding, although uncommon, can occur after diagnostic EUS-FNA and that this complication affects the prognosis of patients. Although an accurate value for the frequency of needle tract seeding caused by EUS-FNA has not been reported, the numbers of case reports on needle tract seeding have been rapidly increasing, especially in Japan. These case reports regarding EUS-FNA-related needle tract seeding prompted us to reevaluate the safety of EUS-FNA because this complication may have a significant influence on patients' prognoses. In this review, we summarize the clinical features and outcomes of needle tract seeding after EUS on the basis of the previously reported cases and provide useful information to prevent and reduce this serious complication.

2 Review Familial pancreatic cancer: Concept, management and issues. 2017

Matsubayashi, Hiroyuki / Takaori, Kyoichi / Morizane, Chigusa / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Mizuma, Masamichi / Takahashi, Hideaki / Wada, Keita / Hosoi, Hiroko / Yachida, Shinichi / Suzuki, Masami / Usui, Risa / Furukawa, Toru / Furuse, Junji / Sato, Takamitsu / Ueno, Makoto / Kiyozumi, Yoshimi / Hijioka, Susumu / Mizuno, Nobumasa / Terashima, Takeshi / Mizumoto, Masaki / Kodama, Yuzo / Torishima, Masako / Kawaguchi, Takahisa / Ashida, Reiko / Kitano, Masayuki / Hanada, Keiji / Furukawa, Masayuki / Kawabe, Ken / Majima, Yoshiyuki / Shimosegawa, Toru. ·Hiroyuki Matsubayashi, Division of Endoscopy, Shizuoka Cancer Center, Shizuoka 411-8777, Japan. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #28246467.

ABSTRACT: Familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) is broadly defined as two first-degree-relatives with pancreatic cancer (PC) and accounts for 4%-10% of PC. Several genetic syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, hereditary breast-ovarian cancer syndrome (HBOC), Lynch syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), also have increased risks of PC, but the narrowest definition of FPC excludes these known syndromes. When compared with other familial tumors, proven genetic alterations are limited to a small proportion (< 20%) and the familial aggregation is usually modest. However, an ethnic deviation (Ashkenazi Jewish > Caucasian) and a younger onset are common also in FPC. In European countries, "anticipation" is reported in FPC families, as with other hereditary syndromes; a trend toward younger age and worse prognosis is recognized in the late years. The resected pancreases of FPC kindred often show multiple pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) foci, with various K-

3 Review [Diagnostic imaging to detect early stages of pancreas cancer]. 2009

Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Osanai, Manabu / Katanuma, Akio / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Kurita, Akira / Kin, Toshifumi / Yane, Kei / Otsubo, Maki / Hashigo, Shunpei. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine Keijin-kai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan ·Gan To Kagaku Ryoho · Pubmed #19891086.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

4 Clinical Trial Multicenter, randomized, open-label Phase II study comparing S-1 alternate-day oral therapy with the standard daily regimen as a first-line treatment in patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer. 2017

Yamaue, Hiroki / Shimizu, Atsushi / Hagiwara, Yasuhiro / Sho, Masayuki / Yanagimoto, Hiroaki / Nakamori, Shoji / Ueno, Hideki / Ishii, Hiroshi / Kitano, Masayuki / Sugimori, Kazuya / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Ohkawa, Shinichi / Imaoka, Hiroshi / Hashimoto, Daisuke / Ueda, Kazuki / Nebiki, Hiroko / Nagakawa, Tatsuya / Isayama, Hiroyuki / Yokota, Isao / Ohashi, Yasuo / Shirasaka, Tetsuhiko. ·Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama, 641-8510, Japan. yamaue-h@wakayama-med.ac.jp. · Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, 811-1 Kimiidera, Wakayama, 641-8510, Japan. · Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-0033, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijo-cho, Kashihara, Nara, 634-8522, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, 2-5-1, Shin-machi, Hirakata, 573-1010, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, 2-1-14 Hoenzaka, Chuo-ku, Osaka, 540-0006, Japan. · National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1, Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan. · Clinical Research Center, National Hospital Organization Shikoku Cancer Center, 160 Kou, Minamiumemoto-machi, Matsuyama City, Ehime, 791-0280, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, 377-2 Ohno-Higashi, Osaka-Sayama, 589-8511, Japan. · Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa, 232-0024, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, 1-40 Maeda 1-jo 12-chome, Teine-ku, Sapporo, 006-8555, Japan. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, 2-3-2 Nakao, Asahi-ku, Yokohama, 241-8515, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, 1-1 Kanokoden, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8681, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Kumamoto University Hospital, 1-1-1 Honjo, Kumamoto, 860-8556, Japan. · Second Department of Internal Medicine y, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, 811-1, Kimiidera, Wakayama, 641-8510, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Osaka City General Hospital, 2-13-22 Miyakojima-hondori Miyakojima-ku, Osaka, 543-0021, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hokkaido P.W.F.A.C. Sapporo-Kosei General Hospital, 8-5 Kita 2 Jou Higashi, Chuo-ku, Sapporo, 060-0033, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655, Japan. · Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kawaramachi-Hirokoji, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, 602-8566, Japan. · Department of Integrated Science and Engineering for Sustainable Society, Chuo University, 1-13-27 Kasuga, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 112-8551, Japan. · Kitasato Institute for Life Science, Kitasato University, 5-9-1 Shirokane, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 108-8641, Japan. ·Cancer Chemother Pharmacol · Pubmed #28251282.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Non-inferiority for overall survival (OS) following alternate-day treatment with the oral anticancer drug S-1 compared with standard daily treatment was assessed in Japanese patients with unresectable advanced pancreatic cancer in a multicenter, randomized, phase II study. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry (no. 000008604). METHODS: Chemotherapy-naïve patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer were randomly assigned 2:1 to treatment with alternate-day (twice daily on alternate days from days 1 through 42 of a 42-day cycle) or daily (twice daily on days 1 through 28 of a 42-day cycle) treatment with S-1. The primary endpoint was OS. Secondary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS), time to treatment failure, response rate, quality of life assessments, and safety. RESULTS: A total of 190 patients were enrolled, of which 185 were included in the final analysis (alternate-day: 121; daily: 64). Median OS was 9.4 for the alternate-day group and 10.4 months for the daily group [hazard ratio (HR), 1.19; 95% credible interval, 0.86 to 1.64], indicating that non-inferiority of alternate-day treatment to daily treatment was not demonstrated. Median PFS was 3.0 for the alternate-day group and 4.2 months for the daily group (HR, 1.65; 95% credible interval, 1.20-2.29). The incidence of anorexia, fatigue, neutrophils, pigmentation, and pneumonitis was lower in alternate-day treatment compared with daily treatment. CONCLUSION: S-1 for advanced pancreatic cancer should be taken daily as recommended, based on the decreased OS and PFS and marginal improvement in safety observed in the alternate-day group.

5 Clinical Trial Updated results from GEST study: a randomized, three-arm phase III study for advanced pancreatic cancer. 2017

Okusaka, Takuji / Miyakawa, H / Fujii, H / Nakamori, S / Satoh, T / Hamamoto, Y / Ito, T / Maguchi, H / Matsumoto, S / Ueno, H / Ioka, T / Boku, N / Egawa, S / Hatori, T / Furuse, J / Mizumoto, K / Ohkawa, S / Yamaguchi, T / Yamao, K / Funakoshi, A / Chen, J S / Cheng, A L / Sato, A / Ohashi, Y / Tanaka, M / Anonymous450897. ·Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan. tokusaka@ncc.go.jp. · Division of Biliopancreatology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Division of Clinical Oncology, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan. · Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Frontier Science for Cancer and Chemotherapy, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan. · Keio Cancer Center, Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Medicine and Bioreguratory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases, Osaka, Japan. · Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Tohoku University, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Surgery and Digestive Diseases Center, International University of Health and Welfare Mita Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Kyushu University Hospital Cancer Center, Fukuoka, Japan. · Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Pancreatology, Fukuoka Sanno Hospital, Fukuoka, Japan. · Division of Hematology-Oncology, Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan, Republic of China. · Department of Oncology, National Taiwan University Hospital, and National Taiwan University Cancer Center, Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Aomori, Japan. · Department of Integrated Science and Engineering for Sustainable Society, Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Shimonoseki City Hospital, Shimonoseki, Japan. ·J Cancer Res Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28210843.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The GEST study showed non-inferiority of S-1 but not superiority of gemcitabine plus S-1 (GS) to gemcitabine alone for overall survival with the data by the cut-off date of 31st July in 2010 for chemo-naïve patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. We considered it important to determine whether S-1 maintains non-inferiority after a long-term follow-up in the GEST study and to obtain a firm positive conclusion. In addition, it may be an interesting challenge to explore the efficacious profile of GS in the long-term follow-up study. Using the data from the follow-up period, background and efficacy in patients from Taiwan and Japan, as well as the rates of tumor shrinkage in locally advanced and metastatic patients (Waterfall plot) were also analyzed. METHODS: The results of the primary analysis were reconfirmed, and subset analysis of overall survival and progression-free survival was performed based on the overall survival data updated by the cut-off date of 31st July in 2011. RESULTS: The median follow-up period was 29.8 months, and 795 deaths occurred (95.6%). The median overall survival was 8.8 months for gemcitabine, 9.7 months for S-1 (hazard ratio [HR], 0.96; 97.5% confidence interval [CI], 0.79-1.17), and 9.9 months for GS (HR 0.91; 97.5% CI 0.75-1.11). In patients with performance status (PS) 0, the median overall survival was 9.8 months for gemcitabine, 10.9 months for S-1, and 10.5 months for GS. In patients with PS 1, the median overall survival was 6.2 months for gemcitabine, 6.3 months for S-1, and 9.6 months for GS. CONCLUSION: Our survey reconfirmed the non-inferiority of S-1 to gemcitabine and showed S-1 can be used as one of the standard treatment options for advanced pancreatic cancer. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00498225.

6 Clinical Trial Phase II clinical trial using novel peptide cocktail vaccine as a postoperative adjuvant treatment for surgically resected pancreatic cancer patients. 2017

Miyazawa, Motoki / Katsuda, Masahiro / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Katanuma, Akio / Ishii, Hiroshi / Ozaka, Masato / Yamao, Kenji / Imaoka, Hiroshi / Kawai, Manabu / Hirono, Seiko / Okada, Ken-Ichi / Yamaue, Hiroki. ·Second Department of Surgery, Wakayama Medical University School of Medicine, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute Hospital of Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Japan. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27861852.

ABSTRACT: We investigated peptide cocktail vaccine OCV-C01 containing epitope peptides derived from KIF20A, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)1 and VEGFR2 combined with gemcitabine in the adjuvant treatment for resected pancreatic cancer patients. A single-arm multicenter phase II study was performed on 30 patients with pancreatic ductal carcinoma who underwent pancreatectomy. At each 28-day treatment cycle, patients received weekly subcutaneous injection of OCV-C01 for 48 weeks and gemcitabine was administered intravenously at 1,000 mg/m

7 Clinical Trial Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study. 2015

Yamaue, Hiroki / Tsunoda, Takuya / Tani, Masaji / Miyazawa, Motoki / Yamao, Kenji / Mizuno, Nobumasa / Okusaka, Takuji / Ueno, Hideki / Boku, Narikazu / Fukutomi, Akira / Ishii, Hiroshi / Ohkawa, Shinichi / Furukawa, Masayuki / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Ikeda, Masafumi / Togashi, Yosuke / Nishio, Kazuto / Ohashi, Yasuo. ·Second Department of Surgery Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Aichi, Japan. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology Shizuoka Cancer Center, Shizuoka, Japan. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Division Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Medical Oncology Division Kanagawa Cancer Center Hospital, Kanagawa, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology National Hospital Organization Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan. · Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. · Dept Genome Biology Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Integrated Science and Engineering for Sustainable society Chuo University, Tokyo, Japan. ·Cancer Sci · Pubmed #25867139.

ABSTRACT: Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival.

8 Clinical Trial Phase I/II clinical trial using HLA-A24-restricted peptide vaccine derived from KIF20A for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. 2013

Asahara, Shingo / Takeda, Kazuyoshi / Yamao, Kenji / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Yamaue, Hiroki. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Chiba Tokushukai Hospital, Chiba, Japan. s.asahara@chibatoku.or.jp. ·J Transl Med · Pubmed #24237633.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We previously developed an immunotherapy treatment utilizing a cancer vaccine reagent KIF20A-66 in order to treat pancreatic cancer. KIF20A-66 is HLA-A24-restricted epitope peptide derived from KIF20A, a member of kinesin super family protein 20A that is significantly transactivated in pancreatic cancer. In this report, we further demonstrated non-randomized, open-label, single centered phase I/II clinical trial of immunotherapy using the KIF20A-66 peptide for the patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Vaccination was performed to the patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, in whom gemcitabine-based therapy had failed. In phase I study, KIF20A-66 peptide was subcutaneously injected weekly in a dose-escalation manner (doses of 1.0 and 3.0 mg/body, 6 patients/1 cohort). After safety was assessed, phase II study was conducted using 3.0 mg of KIF20A-66 peptide. RESULTS: KIF20A-66 peptide vaccination was well tolerated in the doses we examined and tumor responses after 1 month of the treatment were evaluated. Among 29 patients who completed one course of the treatment at least, stable disease (SD) was found in 21 cases, while progressive disease (PD) was found in 8 cases, indicating that the disease control rate was 72%. Objective tumor shrinkage was observed in 8 cases, including 1 case of complete response (CR). The median survival time (MST) and progression free survival time (PFS) were 142 days and 56 days, respectively. These results clearly demonstrate that overall survival of the patients was significantly prolonged, compared to the historical controls of 9 cases with unmatched HLA in the same hospital (MST: 83 days), as well as 81 cases in our and other hospitals (MST: 63 days). CONCLUSION: The patients vaccinated with KIF20A-66 peptide had better prognosis than the control group with best supportive care (BSC). Thus, we concluded that KIF20A-66 vaccination is significantly effective as an immunotherapy against advanced pancreatic cancer. KIF20A-66 peptide was well tolerable in the dose of either 1.0 mg or 3.0 mg/body, and effectively induced peptide-specific response of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Further clinical study using this peptide is a promising approach for advanced pancreatic cancer to achieve high potential benefit for better prognosis. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN-CTR, number UMIN000004919.

9 Article Pathways of Progression From Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm to Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Based on Molecular Features. 2019

Omori, Yuko / Ono, Yusuke / Tanino, Mishie / Karasaki, Hidenori / Yamaguchi, Hiroshi / Furukawa, Toru / Enomoto, Katsuro / Ueda, Jun / Sumi, Atsuko / Katayama, Jin / Muraki, Miho / Taniue, Kenzui / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Ambo, Yoshiyasu / Shinohara, Toshiya / Nishihara, Hiroshi / Sasajima, Junpei / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Mizukami, Yusuke / Okumura, Toshikatsu / Tanaka, Shinya. ·Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; Department of Pathology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Institute of Biomedical Research, Sapporo Higashi Tokushukai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan; Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan. · Department of Cancer Pathology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · Institute of Biomedical Research, Sapporo Higashi Tokushukai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Division of Diagnostic Pathology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Histopathology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan. · Center for Advanced Research and Education, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan. · Diagnostic Partnering, Clinical Sequencing Division, Thermo Fisher Scientific, Tokyo, Japan. · Genomedia Inc., Tokyo, Japan. · Institute of Biomedical Research, Sapporo Higashi Tokushukai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan; Genomedia Inc., Tokyo, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Cancer Center, Keio University Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Institute of Biomedical Research, Sapporo Higashi Tokushukai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan; Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa, Japan. Electronic address: ymizu_ccbr@higashi-tokushukai.or.jp. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #30342036.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are regarded as precursors of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAs), but little is known about the mechanism of progression. This makes it challenging to assess cancer risk in patients with IPMNs. We investigated associations of IPMNs with concurrent PDAs by genetic and histologic analyses. METHODS: We obtained 30 pancreatic tissues with concurrent PDAs and IPMNs, and 168 lesions, including incipient foci, were mapped, microdissected, and analyzed for mutations in 18 pancreatic cancer-associated genes and expression of tumor suppressors. RESULTS: We determined the clonal relatedness of lesions, based on driver mutations shared by PDAs and concurrent IPMNs, and classified the lesions into 3 subtypes. Twelve PDAs contained driver mutations shared by all concurrent IPMNs, which we called the sequential subtype. This subset was characterized by less diversity in incipient foci with frequent GNAS mutations. Eleven PDAs contained some driver mutations that were shared with concurrent IPMNs, which we called the branch-off subtype. In this subtype, PDAs and IPMNs had identical KRAS mutations but different GNAS mutations, although the lesions were adjacent. Whole-exome sequencing and methylation analysis of these lesions indicated clonal origin with later divergence. Ten PDAs had driver mutations not found in concurrent IPMNs, called the de novo subtype. Expression profiles of TP53 and SMAD4 increased our ability to differentiate these subtypes compared with sequencing data alone. The branch-off and de novo subtypes had substantial heterogeneity among early clones, such as differences in KRAS mutations. Patients with PDAs of the branch-off subtype had a longer times of disease-free survival than patients with PDAs of the de novo or the sequential subtypes. CONCLUSIONS: Detailed histologic and genetic analysis of PDAs and concurrent IPMNs identified 3 different pathways by which IPMNs progress to PDAs-we call these the sequential, branch-off, and de novo subtypes. Subtypes might be associated with clinical and pathologic features and be used to select surveillance programs for patients with IPMNs.

10 Article [Detection of early pancreatic cancer:past, present and future initiatives]. 2018

Maguchi, Hiroyuki. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital. ·Nihon Shokakibyo Gakkai Zasshi · Pubmed #29643284.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

11 Article Multicenter study of early pancreatic cancer in Japan. 2018

Kanno, Atsushi / Masamune, Atsushi / Hanada, Keiji / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Ueki, Toshiharu / Hasebe, Osamu / Ohtsuka, Takao / Nakamura, Masafumi / Takenaka, Mamoru / Kitano, Masayuki / Kikuyama, Masataka / Gabata, Toshifumi / Yoshida, Koji / Sasaki, Tamito / Serikawa, Masahiro / Furukawa, Toru / Yanagisawa, Akio / Shimosegawa, Tooru / Anonymous880928. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. Electronic address: atsushih@med.tohoku.ac.jp. · Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Fukuoka University Chikushi Hospital, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Nagano Municipal Hospital, Japan. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kindai University, Faculty of Medicine, Japan. · Second Department of Internal Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, School of Medicine, Japan. · Division of Gastroenterology, Shizuoka General Hospital, Japan. · Department of Radiology, Kanazawa University Hospital, Japan. · Department of Interventional Bilio-Pancreatology, Kawasaki Medical School, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hiroshima Prefectural Hospital, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Hiroshima University Hospital, Japan. · Institute for Integrated Medical Sciences, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Japan; Department of Histopathology, Tohoku University, Graduate School of Medicine, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Japan. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #29170051.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The diagnosis of early-stage pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is still challenging. We conducted a multicenter study to clarify the clinical features of early-stage PDAC in Japan. METHODS: We collected patients with stage 0 and stage I PDAC according to the sixth edition of the Japanese Classification of Pancreatic Carcinoma. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical profiles including opportunities for medical examination, imaging modalities and findings, methods of cytological diagnosis, and prognosis according to the stages at diagnosis. RESULTS: Two hundred cases with Stage 0 and stage I PDAC were reported from 14 institutions, which accounted for approximately 0.7% and 3% of all PDAC cases, respectively. Overall, 20% of the early-stage PDAC cases were symptomatic. Indirect imaging findings such as dilatation of the main pancreatic duct were useful to detect early-stage PDAC. In particular, local fatty changes may be specific to early-stage PDAC. For preoperative pathologic diagnosis, cytology during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography was more commonly applied than endoscopic ultrasound fine-needle aspiration. Although the overall prognosis was favorable, new PDAC lesions developed in the remnant pancreas in 11.5% cases. CONCLUSIONS: This multicenter study revealed several key points concerning the diagnosis and management of early-stage PDAC, including screening of asymptomatic cases, importance of indirect imaging findings, application of cytology during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, and the risk of carcinogenesis in the remnant pancreas.

12 Article Rb Loss and 2017

Hijioka, Susumu / Hosoda, Waki / Matsuo, Keitaro / Ueno, Makoto / Furukawa, Masayuki / Yoshitomi, Hideyuki / Kobayashi, Noritoshi / Ikeda, Masafumi / Ito, Tetsuhide / Nakamori, Shoji / Ishii, Hiroshi / Kodama, Yuzo / Morizane, Chigusa / Okusaka, Takuji / Yanagimoto, Hiroaki / Notohara, Kenji / Taguchi, Hiroki / Kitano, Masayuki / Yane, Kei / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Tsuchiya, Yoshiaki / Komoto, Izumi / Tanaka, Hiroki / Tsuji, Akihito / Hashigo, Syunpei / Kawaguchi, Yoshiaki / Mine, Tetsuya / Kanno, Atsushi / Murohisa, Go / Miyabe, Katsuyuki / Takagi, Tadayuki / Matayoshi, Nobutaka / Yoshida, Tsukasa / Hara, Kazuo / Imamura, Masayuki / Furuse, Junji / Yatabe, Yasushi / Mizuno, Nobumasa. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. rizasusu@aichi-cc.jp. · Department of Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Medical Oncology, Kanagawa Cancer Center, Yokohama, Japan. · Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatology, National Kyushu Cancer Center, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of General Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba, Japan. · Department of Oncology, Yokohama City University Hospital, Yokohama, Japan. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa, Japan. · Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Osaka National Hospital, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Japan. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Kurashiki Central Hospital, Kurashiki, Japan. · Digestive and Lifestyle Diseases, Department of Human and Environmental Sciences, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kinki University Faculty of Medicine, Sayama, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Niigata Cancer Center Hospital, Niigata, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Suzuka General Hospital, Suzuka, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Isehara, Japan. · Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Seirei Hamamatsu General Hospital, Hamamatsu, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Rheumatology, Fukushima Medical University School of Medicine, Fukushima, Japan. · Department of Surgery I, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Neuroendocrine Tumor Center, Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Kyorin University Faculty of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #28455360.

ABSTRACT:

13 Article MicroRNA-196b is an independent prognostic biomarker in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2017

Kanno, Shinichi / Nosho, Katsuhiko / Ishigami, Keisuke / Yamamoto, Itaru / Koide, Hideyuki / Kurihara, Hiroyoshi / Mitsuhashi, Kei / Shitani, Masahiro / Motoya, Masayo / Sasaki, Shigeru / Tanuma, Tokuma / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Hasegawa, Tadashi / Kimura, Yasutoshi / Takemasa, Ichiro / Shinomura, Yasuhisa / Nakase, Hiroshi. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo 006-0811, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Teine Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Surgical Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8543, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Surgical Oncology and Science, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo 060-8543, Japan and. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ikeda Municipal Hospital, Ikeda 563-0025, Japan. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #28186267.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a highly aggressive malignancy, with <50% patients surviving beyond 6 months after the diagnosis, and thus, there is an urgent need to explore new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for this disease. Therefore, we conducted microRNA (miRNA) array analysis to detect miRNA molecules potentially associated with pancreatic cancer malignancy. To assess the identified miRNAs, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-PCR on 248 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (UICC stage II). We also examined miRNA expression [microRNA-21 (miR-21) and microRNA-31 (miR-31)] and epigenetic alterations, including CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), potentially associated with the identified miRNAs. For functional analysis, we conducted proliferation and invasion assays using a pancreatic cancer cell line. miRNA array analysis revealed that microRNA-196b (miR-196b) was the most up-regulated miRNA in pancreatic cancer tissues compared with normal pancreatic duct cells. High miR-196b expression was associated with miR-21 (P = 0.0025) and miR-31 (P = 0.0001) expression. It was also related to poor prognosis in the multivariate analysis using overall survival (hazard ratio: 1.66; 95% confidence interval: 1.09-2.54; P = 0.019). Functional analysis demonstrated that miR-196b inhibitor decreased cell proliferation and that miR-196b mimic promoted cancer cell invasion. In conclusion, a significant association of high miR-196b expression with poor prognosis was observed in pancreatic cancer. Our data also revealed that miR-196b played an oncogenic role and that the transfection of the miR-196b inhibitor had an anti-tumour effect in the pancreatic cancer cell line. These results suggest that miR-196b is a promising diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

14 Article Pancreatic Metastasis from Rectal Cancer that was Diagnosed by Endoscopic Ultrasonography-guided Fine Needle Aspiration (EUS-FNA). 2017

Sano, Itsuki / Katanuma, Akio / Yane, Kei / Kin, Toshifumi / Nagai, Kazumasa / Yamazaki, Hajime / Koga, Hideaki / Kitagawa, Koh / Yokoyama, Kensuke / Ikarashi, Satoshi / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Omori, Yuko / Shinohara, Toshiya. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Japan. ·Intern Med · Pubmed #28154274.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic metastasis from colorectal cancer is rare, and there have been only a few reports of its preoperative diagnosis by endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) with immunohistochemical staining. We herein describe the case of a 77-year-old woman in whom a solitary mass in the pancreatic tail was detected 11 years after rectal cancer resection. The patient also had a history of pulmonary tumor resection. We performed EUS-FNA and a histopathological examination showed adenocarcinoma with CD20+, CD7-, and CDX2+ (similar to her rectal cancer). EUS-FNA enabled a histopathological examination, including immunohistochemical staining, which helped to confirm the diagnosis of pancreatic and pulmonary metastasis from rectal cancer.

15 Article Successful less-invasive endoscopic treatment for bile leakage from choledochojejunostomy site using short-type single-balloon enteroscopy. 2016

Nagai, Kazumasa / Yane, Kei / Katanuma, Akio / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Kin, Toshifumi / Yamazaki, Hajime / Maguchi, Hiroyuki. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. ·Endoscopy · Pubmed #27078628.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

16 Article Tornado effect: accidental removal of a biliary metallic stent on winding around a stent retriever. 2016

Kitagawa, Koh / Katanuma, Akio / Yane, Kei / Kin, Toshifumi / Maguchi, Hiroyuki. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #26713874.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

17 Article Resected tumor seeding in stomach wall due to endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2015

Tomonari, Akiko / Katanuma, Akio / Matsumori, Tomoaki / Yamazaki, Hajime / Sano, Itsuki / Minami, Ryuki / Sen-yo, Manabu / Ikarashi, Satoshi / Kin, Toshifumi / Yane, Kei / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Shinohara, Toshiya / Maguchi, Hiroyuki. ·Akiko Tomonari, Akio Katanuma, Hajime Yamazaki, Itsuki Sano, Ryuki Minami, Manabu Sen-yo, Satoshi Ikarashi, Toshifumi Kin, Kei Yane, Kuniyuki Takahashi, Hiroyuki Maguchi, Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo 006-8555, Japan. ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #26217099.

ABSTRACT: Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is a useful and relatively safe tool for the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. However, there have recently been several reports of tumor seeding after EUS-FNA of adenocarcinomas. A 78-year-old man was admitted to our hospital due to upper gastric pain. Examinations revealed a 20 mm mass in the pancreatic body, for which EUS-FNA was performed. The cytology of the lesion was adenocarcinoma, and the stage of the cancer was T3N0M0. The patient underwent surgery with curative intent, followed by adjuvant chemotherapy with S-1. An enlarging gastric submucosal tumor was found on gastroscopy at 28 mo after surgery accompanied by a rising level of CA19-9. Biopsy result was adenocarcinoma, consistent with a pancreatic primary tumor. Tumor seeding after EUS-FNA was strongly suspected. The patient underwent surgical resection of the gastric tumor with curative intent. The pathological result of the resected gastric specimen was adenocarcinoma with a perfectly matched mucin special stain result with the previously resected pancreatic cancer. This is the first case report of tumor seeding after EUS-FNA which was surgically resected and inspected pathologically.

18 Article Endoscopic retrieval of a proximally migrated biliary stent after pancreaticoduodenectomy by use of a short-type single-balloon enteroscope. 2015

Yane, Kei / Katanuma, Akio / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Kin, Toshifumi. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #26141955.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

19 Article Successful reintervention of biliary stent occlusion after biliary and duodenal stenting by using argon plasma coagulation. 2015

Kin, Toshifumi / Katanuma, Akio / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Osanai, Manabu / Yane, Kei / Ikarashi, Satoshi / Sen-yo, Manabu / Minami, Ryuki / Sano, Itsuki / Yamazaki, Hajime / Maguchi, Hiroyuki. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Hokkaido, Japan. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #25922253.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Article [Differential diagnosis]. 2015

Minami, Ryuki / Maguchi, Hiroyuki. · ·Nihon Rinsho · Pubmed #25857023.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Article [Diagnosis of malignant IPMN and tumor extension]. 2015

Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Maguchi, Hiroyuki. · ·Nihon Rinsho · Pubmed #25857021.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Article Association of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancer tissues with molecular features and prognosis. 2015

Mitsuhashi, Kei / Nosho, Katsuhiko / Sukawa, Yasutaka / Matsunaga, Yasutaka / Ito, Miki / Kurihara, Hiroyoshi / Kanno, Shinichi / Igarashi, Hisayoshi / Naito, Takafumi / Adachi, Yasushi / Tachibana, Mami / Tanuma, Tokuma / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Shinohara, Toshiya / Hasegawa, Tadashi / Imamura, Masafumi / Kimura, Yasutoshi / Hirata, Koichi / Maruyama, Reo / Suzuki, Hiromu / Imai, Kohzoh / Yamamoto, Hiroyuki / Shinomura, Yasuhisa. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Gastroenterology, Teine Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Teine Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Surgical Pathology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Surgical Oncology and Science, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Molecular Biology, Sapporo Medical University School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, Kawasaki, Japan. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #25797243.

ABSTRACT: Recently, bacterial infection causing periodontal disease has attracted considerable attention as a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Fusobacterium species is an oral bacterial group of the human microbiome. Some evidence suggests that Fusobacterium species promote colorectal cancer development; however, no previous studies have reported the association between Fusobacterium species and pancreatic cancer. Therefore, we examined whether Fusobacterium species exist in pancreatic cancer tissue. Using a database of 283 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), we tested cancer tissue specimens for Fusobacterium species. We also tested the specimens for KRAS, NRAS, BRAF and PIK3CA mutations and measured microRNA-21 and microRNA-31. In addition, we assessed epigenetic alterations, including CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Our data showed an 8.8% detection rate of Fusobacterium species in pancreatic cancers; however, tumor Fusobacterium status was not associated with any clinical and molecular features. In contrast, in multivariate Cox regression analysis, compared with the Fusobacterium species-negative group, we observed significantly higher cancer-specific mortality rates in the positive group (p = 0.023). In conclusion, Fusobacterium species were detected in pancreatic cancer tissue. Tumor Fusobacterium species status is independently associated with a worse prognosis of pancreatic cancer, suggesting that Fusobacterium species may be a prognostic biomarker of pancreatic cancer.

23 Article Diagnostic ability of EUS-FNA for pancreatic solid lesions with conventional 22-gauge needle using the slow pull technique: a prospective study. 2015

Kin, Toshifumi / Katanuma, Akio / Yane, Kei / Takahashi, Kuniyuki / Osanai, Manabu / Takaki, Ryo / Matsumoto, Kazuyuki / Gon, Katsushige / Matsumori, Tomoaki / Tomonari, Akiko / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Shinohara, Toshiya / Nojima, Masanori. ·Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital , 1-40/1-12 Maeda, Teine-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 006-8555 , Japan. ·Scand J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #25732902.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) using the slow pull technique (SP-FNA) has recently attracted attention as an effective tissue acquisition technique. However, efficacy of SP-FNA with a 22-gauge conventional needle remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic ability of SP-FNA with a 22-gauge needle. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with a pancreatic solid lesion were prospectively enrolled in this study. SP-FNA was performed at two needle passes with a 22-gauge needle. One dedicated pathologist evaluated the obtained samples in terms of quantity (Grade 0: scant; Grade 1: inadequate; Grade 2: adequate), quality (Grade 0: poor; Grade 1: moderate; Grade 2: good), and blood contamination (Grade 0: significant; Grade 1: moderate; Grade 2: low), and provided a pathological diagnosis. Additional EUS-FNA was performed by applying suction (SA-FNA). The evaluation points were as follows: diagnostic accuracy of SP-FNA compared with that of SA-FNA, and the quantity, quality, and blood contamination level of SP-FNA-obtained samples. RESULTS: We enrolled 40 cases. The diagnostic accuracy of SP-FNA was 90% (36/40). There was no significant difference in the accuracy between SP-FNA and SA-FNA (90% vs. 90%, p = 1.000). The samples obtained using SP-FNA were assessed as Grade 2 for quantity in 29 cases (73%), quality in 31 (78%), and blood contamination in 25 (63%). CONCLUSIONS: Adequate, high-quality, and unsubstantially blood-contaminated samples could be obtained using SP-FNA. The diagnostic ability of SP-FNA was 90%, which appeared to be similar to that of SA-FNA.

24 Article Validation of a nomogram for predicting the probability of carcinoma in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm in 180 pancreatic resection patients at 3 high-volume centers. 2015

Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Yamaue, Hiroki / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Yamao, Kenji / Hirono, Seiko / Osanai, Manabu / Hijioka, Susumu / Kanemitsu, Yukihide / Sano, Tsuyoshi / Senda, Yoshiki / Bhatia, Vikram / Yanagisawa, Akio. ·From the *Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya; †Second Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, Wakayama Medical University, Wakayama; ‡Center for Gastroenterology, Teine Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo; §Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya; ∥Division of Colorectal Surgery, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan; ¶Department of Medical Hepatology, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi, India; and #Department of Pathology, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25423557.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: We previously published a nomogram for prediction of carcinoma in patients with intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN). The objective of the current study was to validate this nomogram in an external cohort of patients at multiple institutions. METHODS: The clinical details of 180 patients with IPMN who underwent a pancreatic resection at 3 hospitals were collected. Four significant predictive factors (sex, lesion type, nodule height, and pancreatic juice cytology) were analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 180 patients, 66 (36.7%) had a main pancreatic duct-type IPMN and 114 (63.3%) had a branch pancreatic duct-type IPMN. The final pathological diagnosis was benign IPMN in 95 (52.8%) patients and malignant IPMN in 85 (47.2%) patients. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.760. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the IPMN nomogram for prediction of malignancy was 0.747 in main pancreatic duct-type IPMN and 0.752 in branch pancreatic duct-type IPMN. The sensitivity and specificity of the model were 80.0% and 57.9%, respectively, when the predictive probability of more than 10% was used to indicate the presence of carcinoma. CONCLUSIONS: This nomogram for predicting the probability of carcinoma in patients with IPMN was accurate in an external validation patient cohort.

25 Article High and low negative pressure suction techniques in EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition by using 25-gauge needles: a multicenter, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. 2014

Kudo, Taiki / Kawakami, Hiroshi / Hayashi, Tsuyoshi / Yasuda, Ichiro / Mukai, Tsuyoshi / Inoue, Hiroyuki / Katanuma, Akio / Kawakubo, Kazumichi / Ishiwatari, Hirotoshi / Doi, Shinpei / Yamada, Reiko / Maguchi, Hiroyuki / Isayama, Hiroyuki / Mitsuhashi, Tomoko / Sakamoto, Naoya / Anonymous1080796. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, Japan. · The First Department of Internal Medicine, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, Gifu Municipal Hospital, Gifu, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mie University, Mie, Japan. · Center for Gastroenterology, Teine-Keijinkai Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan; Department of Gastroenterology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Gastroenterology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Surgical Pathology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Japan. ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #24890422.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: EUS-guided FNA (EUS-FNA) has a high diagnostic accuracy for pancreatic diseases. However, although most reports have typically focused on cytology, histological tissue quality has rarely been investigated. The effectiveness of EUS-FNA combined with high negative pressure (HNP) suction was recently indicated for tissue acquisition, but has not thus far been tested in a prospective, randomized clinical trial. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the adequacy of EUS-FNA with HNP for the histological diagnosis of pancreatic lesions by using 25-gauge needles. DESIGN: Prospective, single-blind, randomized, controlled crossover trial. SETTING: Seven tertiary referral centers. PATIENTS: Patients referred for EUS-FNA of pancreatic solid lesions. From July 2011 to April 2012, 90 patients underwent EUS-FNA of pancreatic solid masses by using normal negative pressure (NNP) and HNP with 2 respective passes. The order of the passes was randomized, and the sample adequacy, quality, and histology were evaluated by a single expert pathologist. INTERVENTION: EUS-FNA by using NNP and HNP. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: The adequacy of tissue acquisition and the accuracy of histological diagnoses made by using the EUS-FNA technique with HNP. RESULTS: We found that 72.2% (65/90) and 90% (81/90) of the specimens obtained using NNP and HNP, respectively, were adequate for histological diagnosis (P = .0003, McNemar test). For 73.3% (66/90) and 82.2% (74/90) of the specimens obtained by using NNP and HNP, respectively, an accurate diagnosis was achieved (P = .06, McNemar test). Pancreatitis developed in 1 patient after this procedure, which subsided with conservative therapy. LIMITATIONS: This was a single-blinded, crossover study. CONCLUSION: Biopsy procedures that combine the EUS-FNA with HNP techniques are superior to EUS-FNA with NNP procedures for tissue acquisition. ( CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: UMIN000005939.).

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