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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ravikanth Maddipati
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Ravikanth Maddipati wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Pancreatic cancer survival analysis defines a signature that predicts outcome. 2018

Raman, Pichai / Maddipati, Ravikanth / Lim, Kian Huat / Tozeren, Aydin. ·School of Biomedical Engineering, Sciences, and Health Systems, Drexel University, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America. · Department of Biomedical and Health Informatics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America. · Center for Data-Driven Discovery in Biomedicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America. · Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States of America. · Stoke Therapeutics, Inc., Bedford, MA, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30092011.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the third leading cause of cancer death in the US. Despite multiple large-scale genetic sequencing studies, identification of predictors of patient survival remains challenging. We performed a comprehensive assessment and integrative analysis of large-scale gene expression datasets, across multiple platforms, to enable discovery of a prognostic gene signature for patient survival in pancreatic cancer. PDAC RNA-Sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas was stratified into Survival+ (>2-year survival) and Survival-(<1-year survival) cohorts (n = 47). Comparisons of RNA expression profiles between survival groups and normal pancreatic tissue expression data from the Gene Expression Omnibus generated an initial PDAC specific prognostic differential expression gene list. The candidate prognostic gene list was then trained on the Australian pancreatic cancer dataset from the ICGC database (n = 103), using iterative sampling based algorithms, to derive a gene signature predictive of patient survival. The gene signature was validated in 2 independent patient cohorts and against existing PDAC subtype classifications. We identified 707 candidate prognostic genes exhibiting differential expression in tumor versus normal tissue. A substantial fraction of these genes was also found to be differentially methylated between survival groups. From the candidate gene list, a 5-gene signature (ADM, ASPM, DCBLD2, E2F7, and KRT6A) was identified. Our signature demonstrated significant power to predict patient survival in two distinct patient cohorts and was independent of AJCC TNM staging. Cross-validation of our gene signature reported a better ROC AUC (≥ 0.8) when compared to existing PDAC survival signatures. Furthermore, validation of our signature through immunohistochemical analysis of patient tumor tissue and existing gene expression subtyping data in PDAC, demonstrated a correlation to the presence of vascular invasion and the aggressive squamous tumor subtype. Assessment of these genes in patient biopsies could help further inform risk-stratification and treatment decisions in pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Regulation of Epithelial Plasticity Determines Metastatic Organotropism in Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Reichert, Maximilian / Bakir, Basil / Moreira, Leticia / Pitarresi, Jason R / Feldmann, Karin / Simon, Lauren / Suzuki, Kensuke / Maddipati, Ravikanth / Rhim, Andrew D / Schlitter, Anna M / Kriegsmann, Mark / Weichert, Wilko / Wirth, Matthias / Schuck, Kathleen / Schneider, Günter / Saur, Dieter / Reynolds, Albert B / Klein-Szanto, Andres J / Pehlivanoglu, Burcin / Memis, Bahar / Adsay, N Volkan / Rustgi, Anil K. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Medizinische Klinik, Ismaninger Str. 22, Munich 81675, Germany. Electronic address: maximilian.reichert@tum.de. · Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital Clínic, Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red en Enfermedades Hepáticas y Digestivas (CIBERehd), IDIBAPS, University of Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin II, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich, Medizinische Klinik, Ismaninger Str. 22, Munich 81675, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of General Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University, Chiba 260-8670, Japan. · Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Institute of General Pathology and Pathological Anatomy, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany; German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Partner Site Munich, Munich, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Heidelberg University, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Heinrich-Heine University and University Hospital Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf 40225, Germany. · Department of Cancer Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Histopathology Facility, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Koc University Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. · Division of Gastroenterology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Department of Genetics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 900 Biomedical Research Building II/III, 415 Curie Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: anil2@pennmedicine.upenn.edu. ·Dev Cell · Pubmed #29920275.

ABSTRACT: The regulation of metastatic organotropism in pancreatic ductal a denocarcinoma (PDAC) remains poorly understood. We demonstrate, using multiple mouse models, that liver and lung metastatic organotropism is dependent upon p120catenin (p120ctn)-mediated epithelial identity. Mono-allelic p120ctn loss accelerates Kras

3 Article EMT Subtype Influences Epithelial Plasticity and Mode of Cell Migration. 2018

Aiello, Nicole M / Maddipati, Ravikanth / Norgard, Robert J / Balli, David / Li, Jinyang / Yuan, Salina / Yamazoe, Taiji / Black, Taylor / Sahmoud, Amine / Furth, Emma E / Bar-Sagi, Dafna / Stanger, Ben Z. ·Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 421 Curie Blvd, 512 BRB II/III, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. · Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 421 Curie Blvd, 512 BRB II/III, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA; Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address: bstanger@exchange.upenn.edu. ·Dev Cell · Pubmed #29920274.

ABSTRACT: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is strongly implicated in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. EMT is thought to be regulated primarily at the transcriptional level through the repressive activity of EMT transcription factors. However, these classical mechanisms have been parsed out almost exclusively in vitro, leaving questions about the programs driving EMT in physiological contexts. Here, using a lineage-labeled mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to study EMT in vivo, we found that most tumors lose their epithelial phenotype through an alternative program involving protein internalization rather than transcriptional repression, resulting in a "partial EMT" phenotype. Carcinoma cells utilizing this program migrate as clusters, contrasting with the single-cell migration pattern associated with traditionally defined EMT mechanisms. Moreover, many breast and colorectal cancer cell lines utilize this alternative program to undergo EMT. Collectively, these results suggest that carcinoma cells have different ways of losing their epithelial program, resulting in distinct modes of invasion and dissemination.

4 Article Pancreatic Cancer Metastases Harbor Evidence of Polyclonality. 2015

Maddipati, Ravikanth / Stanger, Ben Z. ·Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Medicine, Gastroenterology Division, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Abramson Family Cancer Research Institute, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. bstanger@exchange.upenn.edu. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #26209539.

ABSTRACT: SIGNIFICANCE: Studies of tumor heterogeneity indicate that distinct tumor subclones interact during cancer progression. Here, we demonstrate by lineage tracing that metastases often involve seeding by more than one clone and that subsequent cellular outgrowth depends on the metastatic site. These findings provide insight into clonal diversity and evolution in metastatic disease.