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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ewa Malecka-Panas
Based on 22 articles published since 2009
(Why 22 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, E. Malecka-Panas wrote the following 22 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review The Role of Insulin-like Growth Factor (IGF) Axis in Early Diagnosis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma (PDAC). 2018

Wlodarczyk, Barbara / Gasiorowska, Anita / Malecka-Panas, Ewa. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases. · Clinic of Gastroenterology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. ·J Clin Gastroenterol · Pubmed #29912760.

ABSTRACT: New-onset diabetes mellitus (DM) is one of the first symptoms of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The frequency of endocrine disorders is estimated between 40% and 80% in patients with pancreatic cancer. DM is a risk factor for cancer development but it may also be a consequence of the tumor growth. Data confirming the existence of a relationship between long standing type 2 DM and an increased risk of PDAC comes from numerous clinical studies. Insulin resistance phenomenon and hyperinsulinemia may result in the increased proliferation of pancreatic islets which in turn may cause a predisposition to cancer development. In contrast, it is proved that new-onset DM among patients over 50 years old significantly increases the risk of PDAC recognition. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and their complex proteins, IGF binding proteins, which comprise the IGF axis play a crucial role in carbohydrate metabolism disorders and, studies have shown that they may contribute to PDAC growth. Some studies confirm that IGF-1 is connected with early carcinogenesis in animals and humans. Assessing the levels of these proteins may thus be helpful in early recognition of PDAC in patients with recently detected endocrine disorders, especially pancreatic DM.

2 Article Common genetic variants associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma may also modify risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2018

Obazee, Ofure / Capurso, Gabriele / Tavano, Francesca / Archibugi, Livia / De Bonis, Antonio / Greenhalf, William / Key, Tim / Pasquali, Claudio / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Hackert, Thilo / Fogar, Paola / Lico, Valbona / Dervenis, Christos / Lawlor, Rita T / Landoni, Luca / Gazouli, Maria / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Funel, Niccola / Strobel, Oliver / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Cantu, Cinzia / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Landi, Stefano / Neoptolemos, John P / Basso, Daniela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Rinzivillo, Maria / Andriulli, Angelo / Canzian, Federico / Campa, Daniele. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Metropolitan General Hospital, Pireas, Greece. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29868886.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Common genetic variants associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma may also modify risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2018

Obazee, Ofure / Capurso, Gabriele / Tavano, Francesca / Archibugi, Livia / De Bonis, Antonio / Greenhalf, William / Key, Tim / Pasquali, Claudio / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Hackert, Thilo / Fogar, Paola / Liço, Valbona / Dervenis, Christos / Lawlor, Rita T / Landoni, Luca / Gazouli, Maria / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Funel, Niccola / Strobel, Oliver / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Cantù, Cinzia / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Landi, Stefano / Neoptolemos, John P / Basso, Daniela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Rinzivillo, Maria / Andriulli, Angelo / Canzian, Federico / Campa, Daniele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgical Oncology and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Metropolitan General Hospital, Pireas, Greece. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Centre (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29309705.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNEN) account for less than 5% of all pancreatic neoplasms and genetic association studies on susceptibility to the disease are limited. We sought to identify possible overlap of genetic susceptibility loci between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and pNEN; therefore, PDAC susceptibility variants (n = 23) from Caucasian genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were genotyped in 369 pNEN cases and 3277 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium to evaluate the odds associated with pNEN risk, disease onset and tumor characteristics. Main effect analyses showed four PDAC susceptibility variants-rs9854771, rs1561927, rs9543325 and rs10919791 to be associated with pNEN risk. Subsequently, only associations with rs9543325, rs10919791 and rs1561927 were noteworthy with false positive report probability (FPRP) tests. Stratified analyses considering age at onset (50-year threshold), showed rs2736098, rs16986825 and rs9854771 to be associated with risk of developing pNEN at a younger age. Stratified analyses also showed some single nucleotide polymorphisms to be associated with different degrees of tumor grade, metastatic potential and functionality. Our results identify known GWAS PDAC susceptibility loci, which may also be involved in sporadic pNEN etiology and suggest that some genetic mechanisms governing pathogenesis of these two entities may be similar, with few of these loci being more influential in younger cases or tumor subtypes.

4 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

5 Article Expression and Clinical Significance of Cancer Stem Cell Markers CD24, CD44, and CD133 in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma and Chronic Pancreatitis. 2017

Durko, L / Wlodarski, W / Stasikowska-Kanicka, O / Wagrowska-Danilewicz, M / Danilewicz, M / Hogendorf, P / Strzelczyk, J / Malecka-Panas, E. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Pathomorphology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of General and Transplant Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. ·Dis Markers · Pubmed #28659655.

ABSTRACT: Cancer stem cells (CSC) play an important role in pancreatic carcinogenesis and prognosis. The study aimed at examining the expression of CD24, CD44, and CD133 in human PDAC and CP in order to evaluate its clinicopathological correlations and the clinical significance. Surgical specimens from 23 patients with PDAC and 15 patients with chronic pancreatitis after pancreatic resection were stained with CD24, CD44, and CD133 antibodies. The intensity of staining was scored from 0 (negative) to 3 (strongly positive).

6 Article SLC22A3 polymorphisms do not modify pancreatic cancer risk, but may influence overall patient survival. 2017

Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Strouhal, Ondrej / Hughes, David J / Holcatova, Ivana / Oliverius, Martin / Kala, Zdenek / Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Sperti, Cosimo / Federico Zambon, Carlo / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Fogar, Paola / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Capurso, Gabriele / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Valente, Roberto / Gazouli, Maria / Malleo, Giuseppe / Teresa Lawlor, Rita / Strobel, Oliver / Hackert, Thilo / Giese, Nathalia / Vodicka, Pavel / Vodickova, Ludmila / Landi, Stefano / Tavano, Francesca / Gioffreda, Domenica / Piepoli, Ada / Pazienza, Valerio / Mambrini, Andrea / Pedata, Mariangela / Cantore, Maurizio / Bambi, Franco / Ermini, Stefano / Funel, Niccola / Lemstrova, Radmila / Soucek, Pavel. ·Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Physiology &Centre for Systems Medicine, Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin 2, Ireland. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Transplantation Surgery, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, The University Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Brno Bohunice, Czech Republic. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Italy. · Clinica Chirurgica 4, University of Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · ARC-NET Applied research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic and First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Blood Transfusion Service, Children's Hospital Meyer, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria, Florence, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28272475.

ABSTRACT: Expression of the solute carrier (SLC) transporter SLC22A3 gene is associated with overall survival of pancreatic cancer patients. This study tested whether genetic variability in SLC22A3 associates with pancreatic cancer risk and prognosis. Twenty four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) tagging the SLC22A3 gene sequence and regulatory elements were selected for analysis. Of these, 22 were successfully evaluated in the discovery phase while six significant or suggestive variants entered the validation phase, comprising a total study number of 1,518 cases and 3,908 controls. In the discovery phase, rs2504938, rs9364554, and rs2457571 SNPs were significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Moreover, rs7758229 associated with the presence of distant metastases, while rs512077 and rs2504956 correlated with overall survival of patients. Although replicated, the association for rs9364554 did not pass multiple testing corrections in the validation phase. Contrary to the discovery stage, rs2504938 associated with survival in the validation cohort, which was more pronounced in stage IV patients. In conclusion, common variation in the SLC22A3 gene is unlikely to significantly contribute to pancreatic cancer risk. The rs2504938 SNP in SLC22A3 significantly associates with an unfavorable prognosis of pancreatic cancer patients. Further investigation of this SNP effect on the molecular and clinical phenotype is warranted.

7 Article Common germline variants within the CDKN2A/2B region affect risk of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Pastore, Manuela / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Milanetto, Anna Caterina / Landoni, Luca / Maiello, Evaristo / Lawlor, Rita T / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / De Bonis, Antonio / Klüter, Harald / Rinzivillo, Maria / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Hackert, Thilo / Landi, Stefano / Bugert, Peter / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Scarpa, Aldo / Katzke, Verena / Dervenis, Christos / Liço, Valbona / Furlanello, Sara / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Basso, Daniela / Kaaks, Rudolf / Pasquali, Claudio / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Dept of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DISCOG), Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Mannheim Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Heidelberg University, Medical Faculty Mannheim, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital Nea Ionia, Greece. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), Laboratory Medicine, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28008994.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are heterogeneous neoplasms which represent only 2% of all pancreatic neoplasms by incidence, but 10% by prevalence. Genetic risk factors could have an important role in the disease aetiology, however only a small number of case control studies have been performed yet. To further our knowledge, we genotyped 13 SNPs belonging to the pleiotropic CDKN2A/B gene region in 320 PNET cases and 4436 controls, the largest study on the disease so far. We observed a statistically significant association between the homozygotes for the minor allele of the rs2518719 SNP and an increased risk of developing PNET (OR

8 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

9 Article Association of genetic polymorphisms with survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. 2016

Rizzato, Cosmeri / Campa, Daniele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Halloran, Christopher / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Butturini, Giovanni / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Tjaden, Christine / Ghaneh, Paula / Hackert, Thilo / Funel, Niccola / Giese, Nathalia / Tavano, Francesca / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pedata, Mariangela / Pasquali, Claudio / Gazouli, Maria / Mambrini, Andrea / Souček, Pavel / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Capurso, Gabriele / Cantore, Maurizio / Oliverius, Martin / Offringa, Rienk / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Strobel, Oliver / Scarpa, Aldo / Canzian, Federico. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Unit of Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery and Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", S. Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Disease, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Oncological Department, ASL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Molecular Oncology of Gastrointestinal Tumors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany and. · ARC-NET, Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #27497070.

ABSTRACT: Germline genetic variability might contribute, at least partially, to the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Two recently performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on PDAC overall survival (OS) suggested (P < 10(-5)) the association between 30 genomic regions and PDAC OS. With the aim to highlight the true associations within these regions, we analyzed 44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 30 candidate regions in 1722 PDAC patients within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We observed statistically significant associations for five of the selected regions. One association in the CTNNA2 gene on chromosome 2p12 [rs1567532, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-2.58, P = 0.005 for homozygotes for the minor allele] and one in the last intron of the RUNX2 gene on chromosome 6p21 (rs12209785, HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.014 for heterozygotes) are of particular relevance. These loci do not coincide with those that showed the strongest associations in the previous GWAS. In silico analysis strongly suggested a possible mechanistic link between these two SNPs and pancreatic cancer survival. Functional studies are warranted to confirm the link between these genes (or other genes mapping in those regions) and PDAC prognosis in order to understand whether these variants may have the potential to impact treatment decisions and design of clinical trials.

10 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

11 Article Subclinical Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Pancreatitis and Newly Diagnosed Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Gasiorowska, A / Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Kaczka, A / Borkowska, A / Czupryniak, L / Małecka-Panas, E. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Kopcinskiego 22, 90-153, Lodz, Poland. anita@sofcom.pl. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Kopcinskiego 22, 90-153, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Internal Medicine and Diabetology, Medical University of Lodz, Pomorska 251, 92-213, Lodz, Poland. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #26597191.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested that various cytokines may be important players in the development and progression of chronic pancreatitis (CP) and pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC). AIMS: We studied endothelial dysfunction and subclinical inflammation in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic adenocarcinoma and CP. METHODS: A total of 45 patients were included in the present investigation, 27 with CP and 18 with PC. In addition, the study included 13 age- and body weight-matched healthy subjects served as controls. In all subjects, plasma adiponectin, TNF-alfa, interleukin 6 (IL-6), interleukin 1beta (IL-1β), E-selectin, thrombomodulin, adhesion molecules ICAM and VCAM, and endothelin-1 were assessed. RESULTS: PC and CP patients as compared with controls had significantly greater plasma adiponectin (13,292 and 12,227 vs 5408 ng/ml; p < 0.0003), TNF-alfa (22.1 and 23.1 vs 13 pg/ml; p < 0.0002), and IL-6 (6.6 and 7.3 vs 3.3 pg/ml; p < 0.0001). Moreover, there was significantly higher concentration of ICAM (931 and 492 vs 290 ng/ml; p < 0.005) and VCAM (1511 and 1080 vs 840 ng/ml; p < 0.01) in PC and CP patients. When PC and CP patients with and without diabetes were considered separately, there was no difference in adiponectin, cytokines, and parameters of endothelial dysfunction. CONCLUSION: In summary, our data indicate that patients with CP and PC express high levels of several cytokines compared with healthy individuals, especially adiponectin, TNF-α and IL-6. Serum TNF-α and ICAM concentrations coordinately increase in advanced CP. Furthermore, especially in PC subjects, elevated markers of endothelial dysfunction are present. This study provides additional evidence that changes in inflammatory cytokine and adhesion molecules in PC and CP are not likely related to endocrine disorders.

12 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

13 Article TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility. 2015

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Pacetti, Paola / Vodicka, Pavel / Cleary, Sean P / Capurso, Gabriele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Werner, Jens / Gazouli, Maria / Butterbach, Katja / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Giese, Nathalia / Petersen, Gloria M / Fogar, Paola / Wang, Zhaoming / Bassi, Claudio / Ryska, Miroslav / Theodoropoulos, George E / Kooperberg, Charles / Li, Donghui / Greenhalf, William / Pasquali, Claudio / Hackert, Thilo / Fuchs, Charles S / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Funel, Niccola / Dieffenbach, Aida Karina / Wareham, Nicholas J / Buring, Julie / Holcátová, Ivana / Costello, Eithne / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Risch, Harvey A / Kraft, Peter / Bracci, Paige M / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Hartge, Patricia / Strobel, Oliver / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Visvanathan, Kala / Arslan, Alan A / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Souček, Pavel / Gioffreda, Domenica / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Scarpa, Aldo / Mambrini, Andrea / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Klein, Alison / Tavano, Francesca / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Austin, Melissa A / Vodickova, Ludmila / Brenner, Hermann / Chanock, Stephen J / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Piepoli, Ada / Cantore, Maurizio / Zheng, Wei / Wolpin, Brian M / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Canzian, Federico. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Surgical and Oncological Department, Pancreas Institute - University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Central Military Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology (DISCOG), University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Epidemiology, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Environmental Medicine, and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Surgical Clinic 4, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza,", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25940397.

ABSTRACT: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 × 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D' = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 × 10(-5) ), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 × 10(-5) ) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 × 10(-5) ). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants.

14 Article Utility of serum IgG, IgG4 and carbonic anhydrase II antibodies in distinguishing autoimmune pancreatitis from pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. 2014

Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Gąsiorowska, Anita / Olakowski, Marek / Dranka-Bojarowska, Daria / Lampe, Paweł / Śmigielski, Jacek / Kujawiak, Magdalena / Grzegorczyk, Janina / Małecka-Panas, Ewa. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. Electronic address: r-wojnarowska@wp.pl. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. · Department of Digestive Tract Surgery, Silesian Medical University, Katowice, Poland. · Department of Thoracic Surgery, General and Oncological Surgery, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. · Department of Microbiology and Laboratory Medical Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. ·Adv Med Sci · Pubmed #25194335.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can mimic pancreatic cancer in its clinical presentation, imaging features and laboratory parameters. The aim of our study was to compare IgG, IgG4 and anti-CAIIAb serum levels in patients with AIP, pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) and to assess their clinical significance and utility in differential diagnosis of pancreatic diseases. PATIENT/METHODS: The study included 124 patients: 45 with PA, 24 with AIP and 55 with CP. Peripheral venous blood samples were obtained from all analyzed patients at the time of hospital admission and total IgG, IgG4 and anti-CAIIAB serum levels were measured using ELISA tests. RESULTS: Serum levels of IgG, IgG4 and anti-CAIIAb were significantly higher in patients with AIP compared to PA and CP patients (p<0.001). In AIP patients the median IgG levels were 19.7 g/l, IgG4 levels - 301.9 mg/dl and anti-CAIIAb - 81.82 ng/ml, compared to 10.61 g/l, 123.2mg/dl and 28.6 ng/ml, respectively, in PA patients. IgG4 for the cut-off 210 mg/dl showed the best sensitivity and specificity (83.8% and 89.5%) in AIP diagnosis compared to IgG (69.3% and 87.3%, respectively) and anti-CAIIAb (45.3% and 74.3%). However, 16 (35.5%) patients with PA and 14 (25.4%) patients with CP had IgG4 levels greater than 140 mg/dl. Moreover, in 3 (6.67%) patients with pancreatic cancer those values were greater than 280 mg/dl. No patients with CP had IgG4 more than 280 mg/dl. CONCLUSIONS: IgG4 at cut-off 210 mg/dl showed the best sensitivity and specificity in AIP diagnosis compared to IgG and anti-CAIIAb, however elevations of serum IgG4 may be seen in subjects without AIP, including pancreatic cancer.

15 Article Role of adipocytokines and its correlation with endocrine pancreatic function in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2013

Gąsiorowska, Anita / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kaczka, Aleksandra / Borkowska, Anna / Czupryniak, Leszek / Małecka-Panas, Ewa. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Kopcinskiego 22, 90-153 Lodz, Poland. anita@sofcom.pl ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #23890140.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Some authors suggest that adipocytokines contribute to the induction of pancreatic carcinogenesis as well as the development of endocrine insufficiency. AIMS: We evaluate the circulating concentrations of leptin, resistin and visfatin in patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer (PC) and relationship between serum adipocytokines level and clinicopathological features of PC. Moreover the usefulness of those adipocytokines as possible biomarkers of endocrine pancreatic function in PC has been assessed. METHODS: The pilot study group consisted of 45 individuals (mean age 65.6 ± 11.5 years, BMI 21.8 ± 3.4 kg/m(2)) with newly diagnosed PC (within last 1-3 months) and 13 healthy individuals with age, gender and BMI matched to the study group. Among PC patients 18 (40%) had recently diagnosed diabetes. Fasting plasma leptin, resistin, visfatin concentrations were determined with ELISA (R&D Systems, Phoenix Pharmaceuticals) and insulin by RIA (DakoCytomation). RESULTS: Patients with PC as compared to controls had significantly lower plasma leptin (40.6 ± 21.3 vs 63.2 ± 16.3 pg/mL; p < 0,0008). In contrast PC patients showed more than six fold higher level of resistin (126.2 ± 143.2 vs 18.9 ± 7.2 ng/mL; p < 0.009) than controls. The median plasma visfatin was 2.8 ± 1.8 ng/mL, which was not significantly different from the controls (3.8 ± 1.1 ng/mL). When PC patients with and without diabetes were considered separately, plasma leptin concentrations among nondiabetic patients were slightly, but not significantly higher (44.6 ± 21.0) as compared to diabetics (34.5 ± 20.7). Moreover there was no difference between visfatin and resistin level in PC, among patients with and without diabetes. No significant differences between serum level of leptin, visfatin and resistin and age, gender, BMI, smoking status, tumor localization, distant metastases and pain has been found. CONCLUSION: The results of this study confirm previous findings that patients with newly diagnosed pancreatic cancer are characterized with lower level of leptin. This pilot study showed significantly higher resistin concentrations in patients with PC in comparison to healthy controls, which may be helpful in PC early diagnosis. Changes in leptin and resistin level in PC are not likely related to endocrine disorders.

16 Article The estimation of metaloproteinases and their inhibitors blood levels in patients with pancreatic tumors. 2013

Śmigielski, Jacek / Piskorz, Łukasz / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Jabłoński, Sławomir / Brocki, Marian. ·Department of Thoracic, General and Oncological Surgery, Medical University, 113 Zeromskiego Street, 90-549 Lodz, Poland. jacek.smigielski@umed.lodz.pl ·World J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #23768069.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of proteolytic enzymes, MMP-2 and MMP-9, and their tissue inhibitors, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, in the blood of patients with benign and malignant pancreatic tumors. METHODS: MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 were evaluated in the patients with benign and malignant pancreatic tumors before surgery and in the 30-day follow-up. The study covered 134 patients aged 54 to 76 years, who were divided into groups by TNM staging. RESULTS: Before the operation, the highest mean concentration of MMP-2 was found in patients with unresectable cancer, whereas the highest level of MMP-9 was in patients with resectable cancer. The highest level of TIMP-1 was noted in patients with inflammatory tumors. In 1 month following the operation, the highest level of MMP-2 was also in patients with unresectable cancer and the highest level of TIMP-2 in patients with inflammatory tumors. CONCLUSIONS: The evaluation of the level of the studied cytokines in the pancreatic tumor patients can be diagnostically significant in the differentiation of benign and malignant changes. The changes in the levels of the studied enzymes and their inhibitors can have a prognostic value in the clinical severity of pancreatic cancer.

17 Article Genetic susceptibility to pancreatic cancer and its functional characterisation: the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. 2013

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Capurso, Gabriele / Giese, Nathalia / Funel, Niccola / Greenhalf, William / Soucek, Pavel / Gazouli, Maria / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pasquali, Claudio / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Cantore, Maurizio / Andriulli, Angelo / Scarpa, Aldo / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Costello, Eithne / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Heller, Anette / Key, Tim J / Theodoropoulos, George / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Bassi, Claudio / Pacetti, Paola / Piepoli, Ada / Tavano, Francesca / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Plebani, Mario / Fogar, Paola / Büchler, Markus W / Bugert, Peter / Vodicka, Pavel / Boggi, Ugo / Neoptolemos, John P / Werner, Jens / Canzian, Federico. ·German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. d.campa@dkfz.de ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #23206934.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer deaths in the European Union and in the USA, but little is known about its genetic susceptibility. The PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium was established to unite the efforts of different research groups; its aim is to create a large bio-database to uncover new genetic factors for pancreatic cancer risk, response to treatment, and patient survival. So far 2220 cases of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, a smaller number of cases of endocrine pancreatic tumours (n=86), chronic pancreatitis (n=272) and 3847 healthy controls have been collected. As a collective effort of the consortium, SNPs associated with pancreatic adenocarcinoma risk from a genome-wide association study performed in Caucasians were replicated. The possibility that the same genetic polymorphisms may influence patient survival as well was also addressed. This collective effort is particularly important for pancreatic cancer because it is a relatively rare disease for which little is known about aetiopathogenesis and risk factors. The recruitment of additional collaborators and partner institutions is continuously on-going.

18 Article A comparative analysis of K-ras mutation and carcinoembryonic antigen in pancreatic cyst fluid. 2012

Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Pazurek, Marek / Durko, Lukasz / Degowska, Malgorzata / Rydzewska, Grazyna / Smigielski, Jacek / Janiak, Adam / Olakowski, Marek / Lampe, Pawel / Grzelak, Piotr / Stefanczyk, Ludomir / Smolarz, Beata / Malecka-Panas, Ewa. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. r-wojnarowska@wp.pl ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #23127529.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND/AIMS: Analysis of cystic fluid may be useful in distinguishing between benign and malignant cysts which has significant impact on their management. The aim of our study was to assess the diagnostic utility of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and K-ras gene mutation in pancreatic cysts fluid. METHODS: The study included 56 patients with pancreatic cystic fluid collected for analysis. The cysts were classified as benign (simple cysts, pseudocysts, serous cystadenoma) - 39 patients or premalignant/malignant (mucinous cystadenoma, IPMN, cystadenocarcinoma) - 17 patients. The patients history, CEA fluid concentrations and presence of K-ras mutation were analyzed. RESULTS: CEA were higher in patients with malignant cysts (mean levels 238 ± 12.5 ng/ml; range 32.8-4985 ng/ml) compared to benign lesions (mean levels 34.5 ± 3.7 ng/ml; range 3.9-693 ng/ml; p < 0.001). K-ras mutation correctly classified 11 of 17 patients with premalignant/malignant lesions. It was also detected in 1 patient with final diagnosis of benign cyst (the sensitivity 64.7% and the specificity 97.4%; p < 0.01). If CEA and molecular analysis were combined in that cysts with either CEA level>45 ng/ml or presence of K-ras mutation, than 16 of 17 premalignant/malignant cysts were correctly identified (94.1%). CONCLUSION: Molecular analysis of pancreatic cyst fluid adds diagnostic value to the preoperative diagnosis and should be considered when cyst cytologic examination is negative for malignancy.

19 Article Role of cyclooxygenase-2 gene polymorphisms in pancreatic carcinogenesis. 2011

Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Gasiorowska, Anita / Olakowski, Marek / Lampe, Pawel / Smolarz, Beata / Romanowicz-Makowska, Hanna / Malecka-Panas, Ewa. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University, 22 Kopcinskiego, 90-153 Lodz, Poland. renata.talar-wojnarowska@umed.lodz.pl ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #22039326.

ABSTRACT: AIM: To evaluate the clinical significance of -765G/C and -1195G/A cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) gene polymorphisms in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: The study included 201 patients: 85 with PC and 116 healthy controls. -765G/C and -1195G/A COX-2 gene polymorphisms were studied in DNA isolated from blood samples. The associations of the analyzed genotypes and clinical data at diagnosis were evaluated. RESULTS: We found an increased frequency of the homozygous -1195AA COX-2 genotype in patients with PC (53.7%) compared with the control group (21%) (P < 0.01). In contrast, the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of the -765G/C COX-2 polymorphism in the PC patients were not different from those in control groups. A correlation between presence of homozygous -1195AA COX-2 genotype and tumor size > 3 cm was observed (P < 0.05). Analyzed polymorphisms were unrelated to the patients' sex and age, nor to the presence of regional or distant metastases. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results indicate that the -1195G/A COX-2 polymorphism may play an important role in PC prognosis and carcinogenesis.

20 Article Clinical value of serum neopterin, tissue polypeptide-specific antigen and CA19-9 levels in differential diagnosis between pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis. 2010

Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Gasiorowska, Anita / Olakowski, Marek / Lekstan, Andrzej / Lampe, Paweł / Malecka-Panas, Ewa. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Katowice, Poland. r-wojnarowska@wp.pl ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #21242708.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neopterin and tissue polypeptide-specific antigen (TPS) have been suggested to be useful in differential diagnosis between pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) and chronic pancreatitis (CP). The aim of our study was to compare the clinical usefulness of CA19-9, neopterin and TPS serum levels in patients with PA and CP. METHODS: The study included 85 patients with PA, 72 with CP and 50 healthy controls. The serum concentrations of neopterin, TPS and CA19-9 were measured (DRG International, USA). The associations of the analyzed markers and clinical data at diagnosis have been evaluated. RESULTS: Serum levels of neopterin, TPS and CA19-9 were higher in PA patients compared to CP (p < 0.001). TPS and CA19-9 levels were also elevated in patients with CP compared to the control group (p < 0.001). In contrast, there was no difference between neopterin serum levels in CP patients and the control group (p > 0.05). Neopterin showed the best sensitivity and specificity (91.8 and 87.5%) in PA diagnosis compared to CA19-9 (respectively 83.5 and 75%) and TPS (75.3 and 65.3%). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that neopterin may be potentially useful in differential diagnosis between PA and CP. Assessment of TPS probably adds no significant information to that obtained with CA19-9 and neopterin. and IAP.

21 Article Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) genotype and serum concentration in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and chronic pancreatitis. 2010

Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Gasiorowska, A / Olakowski, M / Lekstan, A / Lampe, P / Smolarz, B / Romanowicz-Makowska, H / Kulig, A / Malecka-Panas, E. ·Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. r-wojnarowska@wp.pl ·J Physiol Pharmacol · Pubmed #21224502.

ABSTRACT: Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is necessary for microvasculature development and important for growth and spread of pancreatic tumors. Functional polymorphism of VEGF gene at position C-460T and G+405C may influence VEGF serum level. VEGF gene polymorphisms at position C-460T and G+405C were evaluated in 85 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA), 72 - with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 50 healthy volunteers. VEGF genotypes were studied in DNA isolated from blood samples and serum VEGF concentrations were measured. We found an increased frequency of the homozygous +405C/C VEGF genotype in patients with PA (55.3%) compared with CP (25%) and control group (16%; p<0.01). In contrast, the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of the -460C/T polymorphism in the PA patients did not differ from those in CP and control groups. Serum levels of VEGF were significantly higher in PA patients (mean level: 441 ± 37.2 pg/ml) compared with CP patients (217 ± 13.6 pg/ml; p<0.001) and control group (137 ± 7.7 pg/ml; p<0.001). No relationship between VEGF serum levels and VEGF gene polymorphisms have been found. Our findings suggest that +405C/C VEGF genotype may contribute to pancreatic carcinogenesis. VEGF serum levels, although elevated in PA patients, are not associated with analysed VEGF polymorphisms.

22 Article Tumor necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma genes polymorphisms and serum levels in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2009

Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Gasiorowska, A / Smolarz, B / Romanowicz-Makowska, H / Kulig, A / Malecka-Panas, E. ·Department of Digestive Tract Disesases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. r-wojnarowska@wp.pl ·Neoplasma · Pubmed #19152246.

ABSTRACT: Several biochemical pathways can lead to cancer cachexia, one of which involves the elevation of the cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interferon gamma (INF-gamma). It was suggested that TNF-alpha and INF-gamma genes polymorphisms may influence these cytokines serum levels, but published data are still controversial. The aim of our study was to assess the clinical significance of -308G/A TNF-alpha and +874A/T INF-gamma genes polymorphisms as well as TNF-alpha and INF-gamma serum levels in pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA) and chronic pancreatitis (CP) as regards to healthy volunteers. We studied 41 patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma, 56 with chronic pancreatitis and 50 healthy volunteers. Peripheral venous blood samples were obtained from all patients for TNF-alpha and INF-gamma serum concentrations measurement. After DNA isolation TNF-alpha and INF-gamma genes polymorphisms have been studied using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Plasma levels of TNF-alpha were significantly higher in PA patients (32.7 pg/ml) compared with CP patients (3.2 pg/ ml) and control group (<1.6 pg/ml; p<0.01). Similarly, plasma levels of INF-gamma in PA patients (12.7 pg/ml) were higher from those in CP and control group (<7.1 pg/ml; p<0.01). In contrast, there were no differences between CP patients and healthy volunteers in INF-gamma levels. We observed a trend toward a correlation between weight loss in PA patients and TNF-alpha serum level (p=0.02). The TNF-alpha and INF-gamma genotype distribution were similar in patients with PA, CP and control group. We have not observed any association between TNF-alpha and INF-gamma serum levels and their genes polymorphisms. Our results suggest that elevated TNF-alpha serum level may have clinical significance in the development of cachexia in PA patients. -308G/A TNF-alpha and +874A/T INF-gamma genes polymorphisms probably do not play important role in pancreatic diseases. Key words: pancreatic adenocarcinoma, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interferon gamma, cytokines, polymorphism.