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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Francesca Lugli
Based on 3 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Francesca Lugli wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Real-world study of everolimus in advanced progressive neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Panzuto, Francesco / Rinzivillo, Maria / Fazio, Nicola / de Braud, Filippo / Luppi, Gabriele / Zatelli, Maria Chiara / Lugli, Francesca / Tomassetti, Paola / Riccardi, Ferdinando / Nuzzo, Carmen / Brizzi, Maria Pia / Faggiano, Antongiulio / Zaniboni, Alberto / Nobili, Elisabetta / Pastorelli, Davide / Cascinu, Stefano / Merlano, Marco / Chiara, Silvana / Antonuzzo, Lorenzo / Funaioli, Chiara / Spada, Francesca / Pusceddu, Sara / Fontana, Annalisa / Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria / Cassano, Alessandra / Campana, Davide / Cartenì, Giacomo / Appetecchia, Marialuisa / Berruti, Alfredo / Colao, Annamaria / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco. ·Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; Unit of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; Oncology and Hematology, Policlinico di Modena, Italy; Section of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Departments of Endocrinology and Oncologia Medica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy; Departments of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Oncology, Antonio Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; Division of Medical Oncology and Endocrinology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute Rome, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; Oncology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy; Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Padova, Italy; Departments of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Surgery, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Oncology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology A, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy; Oncologia Medica 1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy; Oncology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan, Italy; Oncologia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease, Sapienza University of Rome, Sant'Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; Unit of Gastrointestinal and Neuroendocrine Tumors, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan, Italy; Oncology and Hematology, Policlinico di Modena, Italy; Section of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; Departments of Endocrinology and Oncologia Medica, Università Cattolica del S. Cuore, Rome, Italy; Departments of Medical and Surgical Sciences and Medical Oncology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy; Oncology, Antonio Cardarelli Hospital, Naples, Italy; Division of Medical Oncology and Endocrinology Unit, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute Rome, IRCCS, Rome, Italy; Oncology, San Luigi Gonzaga Hospital, Orbassano, Torino, Italy; Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; Oncology, Fondazione Poliambulanza, Brescia, Italy; Oncology, Istituto Oncologico Veneto, Padova, Italy; Departments of Medical Oncology and Pancreatic Surgery, AOU Ospedali Riuniti, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Oncology, S. Croce e Carle Hospital, Cuneo, Italy; Department of Medical Oncology A, IRCCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genova, Italy; Oncologia Medica 1, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy; Oncology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda, Milan, Italy; Oncologia, Spedali Civili di Brescia, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy gianfranco.dellefave@uniroma1.it. ·Oncologist · Pubmed #25117065.

ABSTRACT: Everolimus is a valid therapeutic option for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs); however, data in a real-world setting outside regulatory trials are sparse. The aim of this study was to determine everolimus tolerability and efficacy, in relation to previous treatments, in a compassionate use program. A total of 169 patients with advanced progressive NETs treated with everolimus were enrolled, including 85 with pancreatic NETs (pNETs) and 84 with nonpancreatic NETs (non-pNETs). Previous treatments included somatostatin analogs (92.9%), peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT; 50.3%), chemotherapy (49.7%), and PRRT and chemotherapy (22.8%). Overall, 85.2% of patients experienced adverse events (AEs), which were severe (grade 3-4) in 46.1%. The most frequent severe AEs were pneumonitis (8.3%), thrombocytopenia (7.7%), anemia (5.3%), and renal failure (3.5%). In patients previously treated with PRRT and chemotherapy, a 12-fold increased risk for severe toxicity was observed, with grade 3-4 AEs reported in 86.8% (vs. 34.3% in other patients). In addition, 63.3% of patients required temporarily everolimus discontinuation due to toxicity. Overall, 27.8% of patients died during a median follow-up of 12 months. Median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 12 months and 32 months, respectively. Similar disease control rates, PFS, and OS were reported in pNETs and non-pNETs. In the real-world setting, everolimus is safe and effective for the treatment of NETs of different origins. Higher severe toxicity occurred in patients previously treated with systemic chemotherapy and PRRT. This finding prompts caution when using this drug in pretreated patients and raises the issue of planning for everolimus before PRRT and chemotherapy in the therapeutic algorithm for advanced NETs.

2 Clinical Trial Ki-67 grading of nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors on histologic samples obtained by EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition: a prospective study. 2012

Larghi, Alberto / Capurso, Gabriele / Carnuccio, Antonella / Ricci, Riccardo / Alfieri, Sergio / Galasso, Domenico / Lugli, Francesca / Bianchi, Antonio / Panzuto, Francesco / De Marinis, Laura / Falconi, Massimo / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Doglietto, Giovanni Battista / Costamagna, Guido / Rindi, Guido. ·Digestive Endoscopy Unit, Divisionof Digestive and Liver Disease, Catholic University, Rome, Italy. albertolarghi@yahoo.it ·Gastrointest Endosc · Pubmed #22898415.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Preoperative determination of Ki-67 expression, an important prognostic factor for grading nonfunctioning pancreatic endocrine tumors (NF-PETs), remains an important clinical challenge. OBJECTIVE: To prospectively evaluate the feasibility, yield, and clinical impact of EUS-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition (EUS-FNTA) with a large-gauge needle to obtain tissue samples for histologic diagnosis and Ki-67 analysis in patients with suspected NF-PETs. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary-care academic medical center. PATIENTS: Consecutive patients with a single pancreatic lesion suspicious for NF-PET on imaging. INTERVENTION: EUS-FNTA with a 19-gauge needle. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: Feasibility and yield of EUS-FNTA for diagnosis and Ki-67 expression determination. RESULTS: Thirty patients (mean [± SD] age 55.7 ± 14.9 years), with a mean (± SD) lesion size of 16.9 ± 6.1 mm were enrolled. EUS-FNTA was successfully performed without complications in all patients, with a mean (± SD) of 2.7 ± 0.5 passes per patient. Adequate samples for histologic examination were obtained in 28 of the 30 patients (93.3%). Ki-67 determination could be performed in 26 of these 28 patients (92.9%, 86.6% overall), 12 of whom underwent surgical resection. Preoperative and postoperative Ki-67 proliferation indexes were concordant in 10 patients (83.3%), whereas 2 patients were upstaged from G1 to G2 or downstaged from G2 to G1, respectively. LIMITATIONS: Single center study with a single operator. CONCLUSION: In patients with suspected nonfunctioning low-grade to intermediate-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (p-NETs), retrieval of tissue specimens with EUS-FNTA by using a 19-gauge needle is safe, feasible, and highly accurate for both diagnosis and Ki-67 determination. A Ki-67 proliferative index acquired through this technique might be of great help for further therapeutic decisions.

3 Minor Pancreatic metastases from a bronchopulmonary carcinoid diagnosed by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle tissue acquisition. 2012

Larghi, Alberto / Lugli, Francesca / Sharma, Vijay / Carnuccio, Antonella / Anastasi, Francesco / Fusco, Alessandra / Perotti, Germano / De Marinis, Laura / Costamagna, Guido / Rindi, Guido. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #22415675.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --