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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Lingeng Lu
Based on 15 articles published since 2010
(Why 15 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Lin Lu wrote the following 15 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Current Approaches to Pancreatic Cancer Screening. 2019

Chhoda, Ankit / Lu, Lingeng / Clerkin, Barbara M / Risch, Harvey / Farrell, James J. ·Yale Waterbury Internal Medicine Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Pancreatic Disease Program, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut. · Yale Center for Pancreatic Diseases, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Yale Center for Pancreatic Diseases, Department of Digestive Diseases, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. Electronic address: james.j.farrell@yale.edu. ·Am J Pathol · Pubmed #30558719.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) has a 5-year survival rate of only 8% and is estimated to be the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths by 2021. Prior convention held that screening for PDAC would not be beneficial; however, a deeper understanding of the carcinogenesis pathway supports a potential window of opportunity among the target population. Screening for PDAC is not a standard practice among the general population because of its low incidence. However, screening may be beneficial for individuals with familial history, chronic diseases with genetic predispositions, or inherited cancer syndromes, such as hereditary breast ovarian cancer syndrome, hereditary pancreatitis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer), ataxia telangiectasia, and Li-Fraumeni syndrome, all of which have been associated with an increased risk of developing PDAC. The screening strategies among these high-risk individuals are targeted to identify precursor lesions and PDAC at an early resectable stage. This review describes the risk factors for pancreatic cancer, especially the genetic risk factors in high-risk individuals and current screening strategies available for PDAC.

2 Review Exosomes: potential for early detection in pancreatic cancer. 2016

Lu, Lingeng / Risch, Harvey A. ·Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, Yale School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. ·Future Oncol · Pubmed #26860951.

ABSTRACT: Progress in the treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer at earlier stages has motivated research in identifying novel noninvasive or minimally invasive biomarkers for early detection. Exosomes, which contain bioactive molecules (such as proteins, RNAs and lipids), are membrane-structured nanovesicles that are secreted from living cells and are found in human body fluids. As functional mediators, exosomes play key roles in cell-cell communications, regulating diverse biological processes. Here we aim to examine recent findings in the potential diagnostic value of serum exosomes in pancreatic cancer.

3 Article Subgroup analysis reveals molecular heterogeneity and provides potential precise treatment for pancreatic cancers. 2018

Zhang, Heying / Zeng, Juan / Tan, Yongqiang / Lu, Lin / Sun, Cheng / Liang, Yusi / Zou, Huawei / Yang, Xianghong / Tan, Yonggang. ·Department of Oncology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, People's Republic of China, yonggangtann@163.com. · Google Inc., Google Ads, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, Shengjing Hospital, China Medical University, Shenyang, People's Republic of China. ·Onco Targets Ther · Pubmed #30254473.

ABSTRACT: Background: The relationship between molecular heterogeneity and clinical features of pancreatic cancer remains unclear. In this study, pancreatic cancer was divided into different subgroups to explore its specific molecular characteristics and potential therapeutic targets. Patients and methods: Expression profiling data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas database and standardized. Bioinformatics techniques such as unsupervised hierarchical clustering was used to explore the optimal molecular subgroups in pancreatic cancer. Clinical pathological features and pathways in each subgroup were also analyzed to find out the potential clinical applications and initial promotive mechanisms of pancreatic cancer. Results: Pancreatic cancer was divided into three subgroups based on different gene expression features. Patients included in each subgroup had specific biological features and responded significantly different to chemotherapy. Conclusion: Three distinct subgroups of pancreatic cancer were identified, which means that patients in each subgroup might benefit from targeted individual management.

4 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

5 Article Aspirin Use and Reduced Risk of Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Risch, Harvey A / Lu, Lingeng / Streicher, Samantha A / Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quanxing / Kidd, Mark S / Yu, Herbert / Gao, Yu-Tang. ·Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. harvey.risch@yale.edu. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Department of Pancreatic and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. · Wren Laboratories LLC, Branford, Connecticut. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #27999143.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Few options besides the avoidance of smoking and obesity are available to prevent pancreatic cancer. The association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer has been inconsistent across studies. METHODS: We performed a population-based study of 761 case and 794 control subjects frequency matched on sex and age during 2006 to 2011 in Shanghai, China. Participants were asked about episodes of regular use of aspirin, tablets per day or week, and ages that the use started and stopped. Data were analyzed by unconditional logistic regression, with adjustments for age, sex, education, body mass index, years of cigarette smoking, cigarettes smoked per day, Helicobacter pylori CagA seropositivity, ABO blood group, and history of diabetes mellitus. Meta-regression was carried out to summarize the literature. RESULTS: Ever-regular use of aspirin was associated with lowered risk of pancreatic cancer: OR = 0.54; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.40-0.73; P = 10 CONCLUSIONS: Regular use of aspirin thus appears to reduce risk of pancreatic cancer by almost half. IMPACT: People who take aspirin for prevention of other diseases likely also reduce their risk of pancreatic cancer. Aside from benefits for both cardiovascular disease and certain cancers, long-term aspirin use entails some risks of bleeding complications, which necessitates risk-benefit analysis for individual decisions about use. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 26(1); 68-74. ©2016 AACR.

6 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

7 Article Detectable Symptomatology Preceding the Diagnosis of Pancreatic Cancer and Absolute Risk of Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis. 2015

Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Herbert / Lu, Lingeng / Kidd, Mark S. · ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #26049860.

ABSTRACT: The survival duration for pancreatic cancer is short. Given its low lifetime risk (1.5%), established factors for the disease have insufficient specificity to identify individuals at high risk of nonfamilial cancer, and prediagnostic signs and symptoms are vague and not limited to pancreatic causes. We considered whether statistical models that incorporated both risk factors and prediagnosis symptomatology could improve prediction enough to provide practical risk estimates. We combined US Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) incidence data from 2008 to 2010 with regression models from representative case-control data from Connecticut (2005-2009) to estimate age- and sex-specific 5-year absolute risks of pancreatic cancer diagnosis. Our risk model included current cigarette smoking (adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 3.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.1, 5.0), current use of proton pump-inhibitor antiheartburn medications (OR = 6.2, 95% CI: 1.7, 23), recent diagnosis of diabetes mellitus (OR = 4.8, 95% CI: 2.2, 11), recent diagnosis of pancreatitis (OR = 19, 95% CI: 3.1, 120), Jewish ancestry (OR = 1.8, 95% CI: 1.1, 3.1), and ABO blood group other than O (OR = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.0, 1.8). In total, 0.87% of controls with combinations of these factors had estimated 5-year absolute risks greater than 5%, and for some, the risks reached more than 10%. Combining risk factors for pancreatic cancer with detectable prediagnostic symptomatology can allow investigators to begin to identify small segments of the population with risks sufficiently high enough to make screening efforts among them potentially useful.

8 Article Plasma metabolite biomarkers for the detection of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Xie, Guoxiang / Lu, Lingeng / Qiu, Yunping / Ni, Quanxing / Zhang, Wei / Gao, Yu-Tang / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Herbert / Jia, Wei. ·Center for Translational Medicine, Shanghai Key Laboratory of Diabetes Mellitus, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital , Shanghai 200233, China. ·J Proteome Res · Pubmed #25429707.

ABSTRACT: Patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) are usually diagnosed at late stages, when the disease is nearly incurable. Sensitive and specific markers are critical for supporting diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The aim of this study was to use a metabonomics approach to identify potential plasma biomarkers that can be further developed for early detection of PC. In this study, plasma metabolites of newly diagnosed PC patients (n = 100) and age- and gender-matched controls (n = 100) from Connecticut (CT), USA, and the same number of cases and controls from Shanghai (SH), China, were profiled using combined gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The metabolites consistently expressed in both CT and SH samples were used to identify potential markers, and the diagnostic performance of the candidate markers was tested in two sample sets. A diagnostic model was constructed using a panel of five metabolites including glutamate, choline, 1,5-anhydro-d-glucitol, betaine, and methylguanidine, which robustly distinguished PC patients in CT from controls with high sensitivity (97.7%) and specificity (83.1%) (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] = 0.943, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.908-0.977). This panel of metabolites was then tested with the SH data set, yielding satisfactory accuracy (AUC = 0.835; 95% CI = 0.777-0.893), with a sensitivity of 77.4% and specificity of 75.8%. This model achieved a sensitivity of 84.8% in the PC patients at stages 0, 1, and 2 in CT and 77.4% in the PC patients at stages 1 and 2 in SH. Plasma metabolic signatures show promise as biomarkers for early detection of PC.

9 Article Case-control study of aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer. 2014

Streicher, Samantha A / Yu, Herbert / Lu, Lingeng / Kidd, Mark S / Risch, Harvey A. ·Authors' Affiliations: Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health; · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. · Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; and. · Authors' Affiliations: Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health; harvey.risch@yale.edu. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24969230.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreas-cancer prognosis is dismal, with 5-year survival less than 5%. Significant relationships between aspirin use and decreased pancreas-cancer incidence and mortality have been shown in four of 13 studies. METHODS: To evaluate further a possible association between aspirin use and risk of pancreatic cancer, we used data from a population-based Connecticut study conducted from January 2005 to August 2009, of 362 pancreas-cancer cases frequency matched to 690 randomly sampled controls. RESULTS: Overall, regular use of aspirin was associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer [odds ratio (OR), 0.52; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.39-0.69]. Increments of decreasing risk of pancreatic cancer were observed for each year of low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use (OR, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.91-0.98 and OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1.01, respectively) and for increasing years in the past that low-dose or regular-dose aspirin use had started (OR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.92-0.99 and OR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.96-1.00, respectively). Reduced risk of pancreatic cancer was seen in most categories of calendar time period of aspirin use, for both low-dose aspirin and regular-dose aspirin use. Relative to continuing use at the time of interview, termination of aspirin use within 2 years of interview was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR, 3.24; 95% CI, 1.58-6.65). CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide some support that a daily aspirin regimen may reduce risk of developing pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: Long-term aspirin use has benefits for both cardiovascular disease and cancer, but appreciable bleeding complications that necessitate risk-benefit analysis for individual applications.

10 Article Helicobacter pylori seropositivities and risk of pancreatic carcinoma. 2014

Risch, Harvey A / Lu, Lingeng / Kidd, Mark S / Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quanxing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert. ·Authors' Affiliations: Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health; Department of Surgery, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Jiao Tong University; Department of Pancreas and Hepatobiliary Surgery, Shanghai Medical College, Fudan University, Shanghai, China; and Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24234587.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pathophysiologic actions of Helicobacter pylori colonization on gastric acidity have been hypothesized to modulate the effect of pancreatic carcinogens, through CagA-negative organism strain type, hyperchlorhydria and increased risk of pancreatic cancer, or CagA-positive strain, hypochlorhydria and decreased risk of pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine H. pylori strain-specific associations with pancreatic cancer in a population in which colonization by CagA-positive strains is common. METHODS: We carried out a large population-based case-control study of pancreatic carcinoma in Shanghai, China. Venipuncture specimens were obtained from a representative sample of 761 case patients and 794 randomly selected control subjects matched by category of age and gender. Antibody seropositivity for H. pylori and its virulence protein CagA were determined by commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent IgG assays. RESULTS: Compared with individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA, decreased pancreas-cancer risk was seen for CagA seropositivity [adjusted OR, 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.54-0.84], whereas some increased risk was suggested for CagA-negative H. pylori seropositivity (OR, 1.28; 95% CI, 0.76-2.13). No risk interactions were observed between CagA seropositivity and gender, cigarette smoking, or age-21 body mass index. CONCLUSIONS: Similar to what has been seen in animal models, our results provide suggestive evidence in humans for the involvement of gastric acidity, through its bidirectional modification according to colonization by H. pylori CagA strain type, in the risk of pancreatic carcinoma. IMPACT: H. pylori colonization may have diverse effects on cancer risk, depending on the organism strain type as well as on the particular cancer site.

11 Article ABO blood group and risk of pancreatic cancer: a study in Shanghai and meta-analysis. 2013

Risch, Harvey A / Lu, Lingeng / Wang, Jing / Zhang, Wei / Ni, Quanxing / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert. ·Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. harvey.risch@yale.edu ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #23652164.

ABSTRACT: Studies over 5 decades have examined ABO blood groups and risk of pancreatic cancer in Western, Asian, and other populations, though no systematic review has been published. We studied data from 908 pancreatic cancer cases and 1,067 population controls collected during December 2006-January 2011 in urban Shanghai, China, and reviewed the literature for all studies of this association. Random-effects meta-analysis provided summary odds ratio estimates according to blood group and by populations endemic versus nonendemic for cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA)-positive Helicobacter pylori. In our Shanghai study, versus group O, only ABO group A was associated with risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.27, 2.03). In 24 pooled studies, group A showed increased risk in both CagA-nonendemic and -endemic populations (ORpooled = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.32, 1.49). In nonendemic populations, groups B and AB were also associated with higher risk (OR = 1.38, 95% CI: 1.16, 1.64; and OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.24, 1.85, respectively). However, in CagA-endemic populations, groups B and AB were not associated with risk (OR = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.19; and OR = 1.13, 95% CI: 0.92, 1.38, respectively). These population differences were significant. One explanation for contrasts in associations of blood groups B and AB between CagA-endemic and -nonendemic populations could involve gastric epithelial expression of A versus B antigens on colonization behaviors of CagA-positive and CagA-negative H. pylori strains.

12 Article Genetic effects and modifiers of radiotherapy and chemotherapy on survival in pancreatic cancer. 2011

Zeng, Hongmei / Yu, Herbert / Lu, Lingeng / Jain, Dhanpat / Kidd, Mark S / Saif, M Wasif / Chanock, Stephen J / Hartge, Patricia / Anonymous6400691 / Risch, Harvey A. ·Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, School of Public Health and School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #21487324.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Germ-line genetic variation may affect clinical outcomes of cancer patients. We applied a candidate-gene approach to evaluate the effect of putative markers on survival of patients with pancreatic cancer. We also examined gene-radiotherapy and gene-chemotherapy interactions, aiming to explain interindividual differences in treatment outcomes. METHODS: In total, 211 patients with pancreatic cancer were recruited in a population-based study. Sixty-four candidate genes associated with cancer survival or treatment response were selected from existing publications. Genotype information was obtained from a previous genome-wide association study data set. The main effects of genetic variation and gene-specific treatment interactions on overall survival were examined by proportional hazards regression models. RESULTS: Fourteen genes showed evidence of association with pancreatic cancer survival. Among these, rs1760217, located at the DPYD gene; rs17091162 at SERPINA3; and rs2231164 at ABCG2 had the lowest P of 10(-4.60), 0.0013, and 0.0023, respectively. We also observed that 2 genes, RRM1 and IQGAP2, had significant interactions with radiotherapy in association with survival, and 2 others, TYMS and MET, showed evidence of interaction with 5-fluorouracil and erlotinib, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggested significant associations between germ-line genetic polymorphisms and overall survival in pancreatic cancer, as well as survival interactions between various genes and radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

13 Article [The diagnostic value of plasma chromogranin A in neuroendocrine tumors]. 2011

Yang, Xiao-Ou / Li, Jing-Nan / Qian, Jia-Ming / Yang, Hong / Chen, Qiang / Lu, Lin. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730, China. ·Zhonghua Nei Ke Za Zhi · Pubmed #21418832.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate the value of plasma chromogranin A (CgA) in the diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), and to evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of plasma CgA in different gastrointestinal pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP NETs). To investigate the role of monitoring plasma CgA in the progress of GEP NETs. METHODS: ELISA kits were used to measure the CgA plasma level in 56 cases of GEP NETs, 52 cases of pheochromocytoma, and 7 cases of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 52 cases of normal controls respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of plasma CgA in diagnosis of gastrointestinal pancreatic endocrine tumor; pheochromocytomas and SCLC were calculated. The group of GEP NETs included 13 cases of gastrointestinal carcinoid tumors, 13 cases of gastrinomas, 12 cases of islet cell tumors and 18 cases of other type tumors of GEP NETs. The differences of plasma CgA levels and various sensitivities were compared in different types tumors of GEP NETs. Meanwhile the value of plasma CgA in the diagnosis of metastatic and nonmetastatic tumors in GEP NETs was determined. RESULTS: The median CgA levels and quartile of the groups of GEP NETs, pheochromocytomas and SCLCs were 84.5 U/L and 38.3 - 175.5 U/L, 154.0 U/L and 53.3 - 243.8 U/L, and 55.0 U/L and 19.0 - 79.0 U/L respectively, which were significantly higher than that of (18.5 U/L and 12.3 - 25.8 U/L) normal controls (P < 0.001). The sensitivities of CgA in diagnosis of GEP NETs, pheochromocytomas and SCLCs were 82.1%, 88.5% and 57.1% respectively, and the specificities were all 96.2%. In the group of GEP NETs, the CgA level of gastrinoma was significant higher than the groups of carcinoid, islet cell tumor, and other type tumors of GEP NETs. The sensitivities of CgA in diagnosis of gastrinoma, carcinoid tumors, and islet cell tumors were 92.3%, 84.6% and 50.0% respectively. In the group of GEP NETs, it showed significant differences in CgA levels in patients with metastatic and non-metastatic tumors. CONCLUSION: The plasma CgA levels were elevated significantly in the GEP NETs, and showed a high sensitivity and specificity particularly in the diagnosis of gastrinoma. CgA also can be used as a marker in monitoring tumor development and evaluating prognosis during the clinical application.

14 Article ABO blood group, Helicobacter pylori seropositivity, and risk of pancreatic cancer: a case-control study. 2010

Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Herbert / Lu, Lingeng / Kidd, Mark S. ·Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, 60 College St, PO Box 208034, New Haven, CT 06520-8034, USA. harvey.risch@yale.edu ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #20181960.

ABSTRACT: Carriage of a non-O ABO blood group and colonization by Helicobacter pylori are thought to be risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We examined these associations in a population-based case-control study of 373 case patients and 690 control subjects frequency matched on sex and age. Control subjects were selected by random-digit dialing. Seropositivity for H pylori and its virulence protein CagA was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Increased risk of pancreatic cancer was associated with non-O blood group (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.37, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.02 to 1.83, P = .034) and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity (OR = 1.68, 95% CI = 1.07 to 2.66, P = .025), but no association was observed for CagA seropositivity (OR = 0.77, 95% CI = 0.52 to 1.16). An association between pancreatic cancer risk and CagA-negative H pylori seropositivity was found among individuals with non-O blood type but not among those with O blood type (OR = 2.78, 95% CI = 1.49 to 5.20, P = .0014; OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 0.62 to 2.64, P = .51, respectively). This study demonstrates an association between pancreatic cancer and H pylori colonization, particularly for individuals with non-O blood types.

15 Minor Risch et al. Respond to "Clinical Utility of Prediction Models for Rare Outcomes: The Example of Pancreatic Cancer". 2015

Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Herbert / Lu, Lingeng / Kidd, Mark S. · ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #26049861.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --