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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Xiuli Liu
Based on 10 articles published since 2010
(Why 10 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Xiuli Liu wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Communicating with Main Pancreatic Duct: An Unrecognized Presentation of Pancreatic Mucinous Neoplasm? 2017

Zhou, Weixun / Saam, Trustin / Zhou, Yihua / Trevino, Jose / Liu, Xiuli / Cao, Dengfeng / Lai, Jinping. ·Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China. · Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. · Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. jinpinglai@ufl.edu. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #29187489.

ABSTRACT: Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are two well recognized entities of precursor cystic lesions of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. The characteristic features of MCNs are the lined mucinous epithelium with underlying ovarian-type stroma, but without communication with the ducts, while that for IPMNs are the communication with the ducts but without the underlying ovarian-type stroma. Here we report a case of MCN communicating with the main pancreatic duct in a 68-year-old woman. The initial radiographic diagnosis was pancreatic IPMN with main pancreatic involvement and this was also confirmed during gross examination. Histologically, the pancreatic cystic neoplasm was lined with mucinous epithelium with underlying ovarian-type of stroma. Immunohistochemical stains confirmed that the stroma cells were positive for ER, PR, alpha-inhibin and focally positive for CD10. The final pathologic diagnosis was pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm communicating with the main pancreatic duct. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second pathology confirmed case of MCN communicating with the main pancreatic duct. A careful gross examination and bivalvation of the main duct communicating with the cystic neoplasm helps render the correct diagnosis. If more cases are reported in the future, the MCN communicating with duct could become a new entity of pancreatic mucinous neoplasm.

2 Article Interobserver variability in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes and application of their mucin immunoprofiles. 2016

Kwak, Heewon A / Liu, Xiuli / Allende, Daniela S / Pai, Rish K / Hart, John / Xiao, Shu-Yuan. ·Department of Pathology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA. · Department of Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA. · Department of Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ, USA. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #27198568.

ABSTRACT: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm is considered a precursor lesion to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. These are further classified into four histologic subtypes: gastric, intestinal, pancreatobiliary, and oncocytic. The first aim of this study was to assess the interobserver variability among five gastrointestinal pathologists in diagnosing intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes by morphology alone. The second aim of the study was to compare intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtypes, which received consensus diagnoses (≥80% agreement) with their respective mucin immunoprofiles (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC6, and CDX2). A consensus histologic subtype was reached in 58% of cases (29/50) among the five gastrointestinal pathologists. Overall there was moderate agreement (κ=0.41, P<0.01) in subtyping intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms without the use of immunohistochemistry. The histologic subtype with the best interobserver agreement was intestinal type (κ=0.56, P<0.01) followed by pancreatobiliary, gastric, mixed, and oncocytic types (κ=0.43, P<0.01; κ=0.38, P<0.01; κ=0.17, P<0.01; κ=0.08, P<0.04, respectively). Both kappa values for mixed and oncocytic subtypes were likely artificially low due to the underrepresentation of these subtypes in this study and not a true indication of poor interobserver agreement. Following an intradepartmental consensus meeting between two gastrointestinal pathologists, 68% of cases (34/50) received a consensus intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtype. Sixty-nine percent of cases (11/16) that did not receive a consensus intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm subtype could be classified based on their respective immunoprofiles. Standardizing the use of immunohistochemistry with a mucin immunopanel (MUC1, MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC6) may improve the agreement of diagnosing intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm histologic subtypes.

3 Article IgG4 disease: The great masquerader. 2016

Yadav, Divya / Liu, Xiuli / Chahal, Prabhleen. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States. · Department of Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Digestive Disease Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, United States. Electronic address: chahalp@ccf.org. ·Clin Res Hepatol Gastroenterol · Pubmed #26164258.

ABSTRACT: Systemic IgG4 disease can have a wide spectrum of clinical presentation, which can mimic several other disease entities. In this report, we describe a series of two patients with IgG4-related disease who were referred to us initially with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and the second patient with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with peritoneal metastasis respectively.

4 Article The expression of FOXL2 in pancreatic, hepatobiliary, and renal tumors with ovarian-type stroma. 2014

Westerhoff, Maria / Tretiakova, Maria / Hart, John / Gwin, Katja / Liu, Xiuli / Zhou, Ming / Yeh, Matthew M / Antic, Tatjana. ·University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195. Electronic address: mwest2@uw.edu. · University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA 98195. · University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, IL 60637. · Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 809835. · New York University, New York, NY 10012. ·Hum Pathol · Pubmed #24746205.

ABSTRACT: FOXL2, a gene encoding a member of the fork-head-winged-helix family of transcription factors, is one of the earliest expressed genes during female gonadal development. It is expressed in normal ovarian stroma and ovarian neoplasms with granulosa cell lineage. Nonovarian tumors such as pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasms (PMCs), hepatobiliary cystadenomas (HBCs), and mixed epithelial and stromal tumor of the kidney (MEST) have ovarian-type stroma. Immunohistochemical staining with FOXL2, estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor was performed on 21 PMCs, 13 HBCs, and 10 MESTs and assessed for nuclear immunohistochemical positivity in the tumor stroma. All cases of PMC and HBC demonstrated nuclear reactivity for FOXL2 in the subepithelial stromal cells. Ninety percent of MEST demonstrated nuclear FOXL2 positivity. Estrogen receptor nuclear positivity was demonstrated in 57% of PMC, 77% of HBC, and 80% of MEST. Progesterone receptor nuclear positivity was present in 67% of PMC, 100% of HBC, and 90% of MEST. Clinical information was available for 37 patients. Seventy-eight percent of the patients had a history of obesity, heavy alcohol use, or hormone-related therapy. The 2 male patients had histories significant for morbid obesity and chronic alcoholism. FOXL2 is expressed from the early stages of ovarian development and has been shown to be mandatory for normal ovarian function. We have shown that it is also expressed in the aberrant ovarian-type stroma characteristic of PMC, HBC, and MEST. Most of such patients, including the rare male patients, have risk factors for hormonal abnormalities such as obesity and hormonal replacement therapy.

5 Article Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas of the pancreas: a clinicopathologic analysis of 44 cases. 2014

Basturk, Olca / Tang, Laura / Hruban, Ralph H / Adsay, Volkan / Yang, Zhaohai / Krasinskas, Alyssa M / Vakiani, Efsevia / La Rosa, Stefano / Jang, Kee-Taek / Frankel, Wendy L / Liu, Xiuli / Zhang, Lizhi / Giordano, Thomas J / Bellizzi, Andrew M / Chen, Jey-Hsin / Shi, Chanjuan / Allen, Peter / Reidy, Diane L / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Saka, Burcu / Rezaee, Neda / Deshpande, Vikram / Klimstra, David S. ·Departments of *Pathology ***Surgery †††Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY †Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center ‡‡‡Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD ‡Department of Pathology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA §Department of Pathology, Penn State Hershey MC, Hershey ∥Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA **Department of Pathology, Ohio State University, Columbus ††Department of Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH ‡‡Department of Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN §§Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI ∥∥Department of Pathology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA ¶¶Department of Pathology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN ##Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN §§§Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA ¶Department of Pathology, Ospedale di Circolo, Varese, Italy #Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #24503751.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the pancreas, poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas include small cell carcinoma and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma and are rare; data regarding their pathologic and clinical features are very limited. DESIGN: A total of 107 pancreatic resections originally diagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas were reassessed using the classification and grading (mitotic rate/Ki67 index) criteria put forth by the World Health Organization in 2010 for the gastroenteropancreatic system. Immunohistochemical labeling for neuroendocrine and acinar differentiation markers was performed. Sixty-three cases were reclassified, mostly as well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumor (NET) or acinar cell carcinoma, and eliminated. The clinicopathologic features and survival of the remaining 44 poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas were further assessed. RESULTS: The mean patient age was 59 years (range, 21 to 82 y), and the male/female ratio was 1.4. Twenty-seven tumors were located in the head of the pancreas, 3 in the body, and 11 in the tail. The median tumor size was 4 cm (range, 2 to 18 cm). Twenty-seven tumors were large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas, and 17 were small cell carcinomas (mean mitotic rate, 37/10 and 51/10 HPF; mean Ki67 index, 66% and 75%, respectively). Eight tumors had combined components, mostly adenocarcinomas. In addition, 2 tumors had components of well-differentiated NET. Eighty-eight percent of the patients had nodal or distant metastatic disease at presentation, and an additional 7% developed metastases subsequently. Follow-up information was available for 43 patients; 33 died of disease, with a median survival of 11 months (range, 0 to 104 mo); 8 were alive with disease, with a median follow-up of 19.5 months (range, 0 to 71 mo). The 2- and 5-year survival rates were 22.5% and 16.1%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is a highly aggressive neoplasm, with frequent metastases and poor survival. Most patients die within less than a year. Most (61%) are large cell neuroendocrine carcinomas. Well-differentiated NET and acinar cell carcinoma are often misdiagnosed as poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinoma, emphasizing that diagnostic criteria need to be clearly followed to ensure accurate diagnosis.

6 Article Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma with autoimmune pancreatitis-like histologic and immunohistochemical features. 2014

Zhang, Xuefeng / Liu, Xiuli / Joseph, Loren / Zhao, Lei / Hart, John / Xiao, Shu-Yuan. ·Department of Pathology, University of Chicago Medical Center, 5841S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60605, USA. · Department of Pathology, Cleveland Clinics, Cleveland, OH 55195, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Chicago Medical Center, 5841S Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60605, USA. Electronic address: sxiao@bsd.uchicago.edu. ·Hum Pathol · Pubmed #24457081.

ABSTRACT: Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) often manifests as a mass lesion causing obstructive jaundice, clinically mimicking pancreatic carcinoma. A diagnosis of AIP may obviate the need for surgical resection, as most patients respond to steroid treatment. However, it is not clear whether these 2 conditions can coexist. In this study, 105 specimens resected for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) that also have changes of chronic pancreatitis were examined for features considered to be characteristic of AIP. Of 105 cases of PDAC with changes of chronic pancreatitis, 10 (9.5%) exhibited histologic features of AIP, including exuberant fibrosis, lymphoplasmacytic infiltration, obliterative phlebitis, or granulocytic epithelial lesions. Of these 10 cases, 7 had more than 20 immunoglobulin G4+ plasma cells per high-power field. Of these 7 cases, 5 were analyzed for Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene mutation and SMAD4 expression. Three cases showed K-ras mutation and/or loss of SMAD4 expression in benign AIP-like areas. These findings suggest 2 possibilities: first, AIP-like lesions may occur in a small but significant portion of PDAC cases; second, some PDACs may arise in a background of AIP. Therefore, caution is necessary when making a diagnosis of AIP by needle biopsy of a mass lesion, and patients with a tentative AIP diagnosis should be closely followed up clinically.

7 Article Vascular endothelial growth factor levels in bile distinguishes pancreatic cancer from other etiologies of biliary stricture: a pilot study. 2013

Navaneethan, Udayakumar / Gutierrez, Norma G / Jegadeesan, Ramprasad / Venkatesh, Preethi G K / Poptic, Earl / Liu, Xiuli / Sanaka, Madhusudhan R / Jang, Sunguk / Vargo, John J / Parsi, Mansour A. ·Section for Advanced Endoscopy and Pancreatobiliary Disorders, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Digestive Disease Institute, Desk A30, The Cleveland Clinic, 9500 Euclid Ave., Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA, udhaykumar81@gmail.com. ·Dig Dis Sci · Pubmed #23828141.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Determining the benign or malignant nature of biliary strictures can be challenging. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays an important role in tumor angiogenesis. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether VEGF levels in bile aspirated during endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERCP) can distinguish pancreatic cancer from other causes of biliary stricture. METHODS: Bile was directly aspirated in 53 consecutive patients from March 2012 to October 2012 during ERCP from the common bile duct including 15 with pancreatic cancer, 18 with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC), nine with cholangiocarcinoma (CCA), and 11 with benign biliary conditions (sphincter of Oddi and choledocholihiasis). Levels of VEGF in bile were measured. The diagnostic performance was then validated in a second, independent validation cohort of 18 patients (pancreatic cancer n = 10, benign n = 8). RESULTS: A total of 53 consecutive patients were recruited. The median bile VEGF levels were significantly elevated in patients with pancreatic cancer (1.9 ng/ml (interquartile range [IQR] 0.7, 2.2) compared to those with benign biliary conditions (0.3 ng/ml [IQR 0.2, 0.6]; p < 0.001), PSC (0.7 ng/ml [IQR 0.5, 0.9]; p = 0.02) or CCA (0.4 ng/ml [IQR 0.1, 0.5]; p < 0.001). A VEGF cut-off value of 0.5 ng/ml distinguished pancreatic cancer from CCA with a sensitivity and specificity of 93.3 and 88.9 %, respectively, and area under curve (AUC) of 0.93, and from benign conditions with a sensitivity and specificity of 93.3 and 72.7 %, respectively, with AUC of 0.89. The diagnostic accuracy of biliary VEGF was confirmed in the second independent validation cohort. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that measurement of biliary VEGF-1 levels distinguishes patients with pancreatic cancer from other etiologies of biliary stricture. This may be particularly relevant in approaching patients with indeterminate biliary stricture.

8 Article High expression of survivin is prognostic of shorter survival but not predictive of adjuvant gemcitabine benefit in patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2013

Xie, Hao / Jiang, Wei / Xiao, Shu-Yuan / Liu, Xiuli. ·Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA. ·J Histochem Cytochem · Pubmed #23124118.

ABSTRACT: Overexpression of survivin has been associated with gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but previous studies have shown conflicting results. This study aims to determine its prognostic value in resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma with or without adjuvant therapy and its predictive value in adjuvant gemcitabine benefit in patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma. This study included 118 patients who underwent pancreaticoduodectomy from 1999 to 2007, with no neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Forty-five patients received adjuvant gemcitabine. Survivin expression was assessed immunohistochemically and was graded as low (≤10% positive cells) and high (>10% positive cells) by recursive partitioning analysis. Prognostic factors, including tumor size, number of positive lymph nodes, perineural invasion, and stage, were identified for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) using Cox proportional hazards models. Multivariable analysis of the entire cohort revealed that both high survivin expression and perineural invasion predict significantly shorter OS (hazard ratio [HR] 2.0, p=0.01; HR 1.9, p=0.01, respectively) and shorter PFS (HR 1.9, p=0.04; HR 3.1, p=0.0006, respectively). Expression of survivin predicts neither OS nor PFS in patients treated with adjuvant gemcitabine. In summary, high expression of survivin is associated with shorter OS and PFS in patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma after adjusting for other histopathological factors. However, survivin has no predictive value of adjuvant gemcitabine benefit.

9 Article Predictive and prognostic roles of ribonucleotide reductase M1 in resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2013

Xie, Hao / Jiang, Wei / Jiang, John / Wang, Yixin / Kim, Richard / Liu, Xiaobo / Liu, Xiuli. ·Department of Anatomic Pathology, The Cleveland Clinic, Ohio, USA. ·Cancer · Pubmed #22736490.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ribonucleotide reductase M1 (RRM1) is an important molecule in different types of cancer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the predictive roles of RRM1 in the survival of patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma who received treatment with gemcitabine or nongemcitabine adjuvant therapy. METHODS: In total, 122 patients underwent tumor resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the authors' institution from October 1999 to December 2007. Total RNA was isolated from microdissected, paraffin-embedded tumors. RRM1 expression levels were measured using quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) and were dichotomized using recursive partitioning analysis. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate overall survival and progression-free survival, and the predictive value of RRM1 expression on survival was examined using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: RRM1 expression did not have significant prognostic value in the entire cohort regarding overall survival (P = .2) or progression-free survival (P = .7). In the subgroup of 44 patients who received adjuvant gemcitabine, patients who had low RRM1 expression had longer overall survival (median, 47.8 months vs 14.1 months; P = .005) and a trend toward longer progression-free survival (median not reached vs 12.9 months; P = .06). In contrast, in the subgroup of 35 patients who received nongemcitabine adjuvant therapy, patients who had high RRM1 expression had significantly longer overall survival (median, 41.9 months vs 19.8 months; P = .01) and progression-free survival (median, 70.0 months vs 11.8 months; P = .04). These results were confirmed in Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, low RRM1 expression in the tumor predicted an overall survival benefit of adjuvant gemcitabine; and high RRM1 expression predicted the survival benefit of nongemcitabine adjuvant therapy.

10 Article Ribonucleotide reductase M2 does not predict survival in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2012

Xie, Hao / Lin, Jingmei / Thomas, Dafydd G / Jiang, Wei / Liu, Xiuli. ·Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA. ·Int J Clin Exp Pathol · Pubmed #22670179.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ribonucleotide reductase M2 (RRM2) was associated with pancreatic tumor progression and resistance to gemcitabine. This study aimed to determine if RRM2 protein expression was prognostic in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma and predictive of adjuvant gemcitabine benefit. METHODS: 117 patients underwent tumor resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma from 10/1999 to 12/2007. We constructed tissue microarrays from paraffin-embedded tumors and determined RRM2 protein expression using immunohistochemistry and grouped as negative or positive. We estimated overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) using the Kaplan-Meier method and examined the prognostic and predictive value of RRM2 expression using Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: RRM2 expression showed no prognostic value in the entire group regarding OS (median OS 30.9 months in RRM2-positive versus 13.7 months in RRM2-negative, P = 0.26) and PFS (median OS 20.6 months in RRM2-positive versus 11.8 months in RRM2-negative, P = 0.46). RRM2 expression did not predict adjuvant gemcitabine benefit in the subgroup of 44 patients who received gemcitabine therapy (median OS 31.2 versus 15.2 months, P = 0.62; median PFS 11.3 versus 14.0 months, P = 0.35). Cox proportional hazards regression showed no prognostic effect of RRM2 expression on OS and PFS in the subgroup of 44 patients. However, the number of positive lymph nodes and perineural invasion were prognostic factors for OS (HR 1.2, P = 0.005) and for PFS (HR 5.5, P = 0.007), respectively. CONCLUSION: RRM2 protein expression in pancreatic adenocarcinoma is neither prognostic nor predictive of adjuvant gemcitabine benefit in patients with resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma.