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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Theodoros Liakakos
Based on 4 articles published since 2010
(Why 4 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Theodoros Liakakos wrote the following 4 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review From Clinical Standards to Translating Next-Generation Sequencing Research into Patient Care Improvement for Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Cancers. 2017

Kyrochristos, Ioannis D / Glantzounis, Georgios K / Ziogas, Demosthenes E / Gizas, Ioannis / Schizas, Dimitrios / Lykoudis, Efstathios G / Felekouras, Evangelos / Machairas, Anastasios / Katsios, Christos / Liakakos, Theodoros / Cho, William C / Roukos, Dimitrios H. ·Centre for Biosystems and Genome Network Medicine, Ioannina University, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. ikyrochristos@hotmail.com. · Department of Surgery, Ioannina University Hospital, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. ikyrochristos@hotmail.com. · Department of Surgery, Ioannina University Hospital, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. gglantzounis@gmail.com. · Centre for Biosystems and Genome Network Medicine, Ioannina University, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. deziogas@hotmail.com. · Department of Surgery, 'G. Hatzikosta' General Hospital, 45001 Ioannina, Greece. deziogas@hotmail.com. · General Hospital of Grevena, 51100 Grevena, Greece. gizas24@yahoo.gr. · 1st Department of Surgery, Laikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece. schizasad@gmail.com. · Department of Plastic Surgery, Ioannina University School of Medicine, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. elykoudi@cc.uoi.gr. · 1st Department of Surgery, Laikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece. evangelosf@hotmail.com. · Third Department of Surgery, Attikon General Hospital, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 12462 Athens, Greece. anmach@med.uoa.gr. · Department of Surgery, Ioannina University Hospital, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. chkatsios@gmail.com. · 1st Department of Surgery, Laikon General Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 11527 Athens, Greece. theodlia@otenet.gr. · Department of Clinical Oncology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. chocs@ha.org.hk. · Centre for Biosystems and Genome Network Medicine, Ioannina University, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. droukos@uoi.gr. · Department of Surgery, Ioannina University Hospital, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. droukos@uoi.gr. · Biomedical Research Foundation of the Academy of Athens (BRFAA), 11527 Athens, Greece. droukos@uoi.gr. ·Int J Mol Sci · Pubmed #28106782.

ABSTRACT: Hepatobiliary and pancreatic (HBP) cancers are associated with high cancer-related death rates. Surgery aiming for complete tumor resection (R0) remains the cornerstone of the treatment for HBP cancers. The current progress in the adjuvant treatment is quite slow, with gemcitabine chemotherapy available only for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). In the advanced and metastatic setting, only two targeted drugs have been approved by the Food & Drug Administration (FDA), which are sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma and erlotinib for PDA. It is a pity that multiple Phase III randomized control trials testing the efficacy of targeted agents have negative results. Failure in the development of effective drugs probably reflects the poor understanding of genome-wide alterations and molecular mechanisms orchestrating therapeutic resistance and recurrence. In the post-ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements) era, cancer is referred to as a highly heterogeneous and systemic disease of the genome. The unprecedented potential of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to accurately identify genetic and genomic variations has attracted major research and clinical interest. The applications of NGS include targeted NGS with potential clinical implications, while whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing focus on the discovery of both novel cancer driver genes and therapeutic targets. These advances dictate new designs for clinical trials to validate biomarkers and drugs. This review discusses the findings of available NGS studies on HBP cancers and the limitations of genome sequencing analysis to translate genome-based biomarkers and drugs into patient care in the clinic.

2 Review Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: current opinions on a rare, but potentially curable neoplasm. 2014

Karakaxas, Dimitrios / Gazouli, Maria / Liakakos, Theodoros / Vaiopoulou, Anna / Apessou, Dimitra / Papaparaskeva, Kleo / Patapis, Pavlos / Dervenis, Christos. ·aSurgical Department-HPB Surgical Unit, Konstantopouleion Agia Olga General Hospital bLaboratory of Biology, Department of Basic Medical Science, School of Medicine, University of Athens cThird Department of Surgery, University of Athens School of Medicine, Attikon University Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #24987821.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) share a unique genetic identity, functional behavior, and clinical course. Compared with tumors of the exocrine pancreas, they are rare and show a different biologic behavior and prognosis. On the basis of data from recent studies, all PNETs, outside of small insulinomas, should be considered potentially malignant and treated accordingly. Untreated tumors have a high possibility to grow locally into adjacent structures or spread to distant organs. Although surgical excision irrespective of tumor functioning or nonfunctioning state remains the cornerstone of therapy, providing the best disease-free and survival rates to date, the understanding of the genetic nature of the disease yields new 'targets' to consider in drug development. The aim of this review is to summarize all recent advances of genetic research and new drug development in terms of PNETs, especially their genetic identity and subsequent alterations leading to the development of near or total malignant activity, and the new medical treatment strategies of this potentially curable disease on the basis of therapeutical agents acting, where possible, at the genetic level.

3 Review Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with concomitant heterotopic pancreatic cystic neoplasia of the stomach: a case report and review of the literature. 2010

Tsapralis, Dimitrios / Charalabopoulos, Alexandros / Karamitopoulou, Eva / Schizas, Dimitrios / Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos / Liakakos, Theodoros / Macheras, Anastasios. ·Department of Pathology, Athens University Medical School, Attikon University Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·Diagn Pathol · Pubmed #20205774.

ABSTRACT: A 60-year-old Caucasian male underwent a total pancreatectomy for a mixed type pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) arising in the main and secondary pancreatic ducts. During surgery, a subserosal polypoid mass was noted at the greater curvature of the gastric antrum and was enucleated. This mass was proven to be heterotopic pancreatic tissue with cystic neoplasia of the IPMN histologic subtype. Through an extensive search of the literature, we found that this is the first case ever reported with simultaneous existence of IPMN changes, in the main and secondary ducts of the orthotopic pancreas and in the heterotopic pancreatic tissue of the gastric wall.

4 Article Genetic polymorphisms of inflammatory response gene TNF-α and its influence on sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors predisposition risk. 2014

Karakaxas, Dimitrios / Gazouli, Maria / Coker, Ahmet / Agalianos, Christos / Papanikolaou, Ioannis S / Patapis, Pavlos / Liakakos, Theodoros / Dervenis, Christos. ·Department of General Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. ·Med Oncol · Pubmed #25213764.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosed incidence of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) is increasing; however, their etiology remains poorly understood. PNETs are a rare, heterogeneous group of tumors arising from the endocrine cells of the pancreas, and genetic risk factors for sporadic pNETs are inadequately understood. It is known that pNETs secrete biogenic amines, hormones and growth factors, tumor necrosis factor-a (TNF-α) being one of them. Furthermore, cytokines and other proinflammatory mediators have been implicated in inflammatory pancreatic diseases including pancreatitis and cancer. The aim of our study was to analyze TNF-α promoter gene polymorphisms as risk factors for pNETs using germline DNA collected in a population-based case-control study of pancreatic cancer [42 pNET cases, 78 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cases, 17 intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN) and 98 healthy controls] conducted in the Athens, Greece and Izmir, Turkey areas. For subsequent analysis, we excluded cases and controls with known genetic syndromes. The CC genotype at the -1031 position was more frequent in pNET and IPMN patients (p=0.0002 and p=0.009, respectively), suggesting its possible role in pNET development. Furthermore, the AA genotype at the -308 position was overrepresented in IPMN cases (p=0.03), and AA genotype at the -238 position was more frequent in PDAC cases (p=0.03) compared to healthy individuals. With regard to tumor characteristics, no statistically significant association was detected. Our findings suggest the putative role of TNF-α -1031 polymorphism in the development of pNET and IPMN, whereas the -308 polymorphism seems to be overrepresented among IPMN cases and -238 polymorphism among PDAC cases.