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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Donghui Li
Based on 61 articles published since 2009
(Why 61 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Donghui Li wrote the following 61 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Review Effect of Diabetes Mellitus on Survival in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. 2015

Mao, Yixiang / Tao, Min / Jia, Xiaoyan / Xu, Hong / Chen, Kai / Tang, Hongwei / Li, Donghui. ·Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, China. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai, China. · Jiangsu Institute of Clinical Immunology, Suzhou, China. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #26598798.

ABSTRACT: Concurrent diabetes has been linked with an increased risk of death in many cancers, but findings in pancreatic cancer have been inconsistent. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effect of diabetes on survival in patients with pancreatic cancer. Of 4, 463 original articles, 41 were included in the review; 29 studies with 33 risk estimates were included in the meta-analysis. In the overall comparison of patients with pancreatic cancer and diabetes with their nondiabetic counterparts, the former had significantly higher all-cause mortality (pooled HR: 1.13; 95% CI: 1.04-1.22). Subgroup analyses showed that diabetes was associated with poor survival in patients with resectable disease (HR: 1.37; 95% CI: 1.15-1.63) but not in those with unresectable disease (HR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.89-1.29). The HR (95% CI) was 1.52 (1.20-1.93) for patients with new-onset diabetes (≤ 2 years of diabetes duration) and 1.22 (0.83-1.80) for those with longstanding diabetes (> 2 years). Diabetes was associated with higher mortality overall in patients with pancreatic cancer. The effect of diabetes on overall survival was associated with the stages of tumor and the duration of diabetes.

2 Clinical Trial RECQ1 A159C Polymorphism Is Associated With Overall Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Replication Study in NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704. 2016

Li, Donghui / Moughan, Jennifer / Crane, Christopher / Hoffman, John P / Regine, William F / Abrams, Ross A / Safran, Howard / Liu, Chang / Chang, Ping / Freedman, Gary M / Winter, Kathryn A / Guha, Chandan / Abbruzzese, James L. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: dli@mdanderson.org. · NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland. · Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, Rhode Island. · Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #26725729.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To confirm whether a previously observed association between RECQ1 A159C variant and clinical outcome of resectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation is reproducible in another patient population prospectively treated with postoperative chemoradiation. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Patients were selected, according to tissue availability, from eligible patients with resected pancreatic cancer who were enrolled on the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 trial of 5-fluorouacil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation preceded and followed by 5-FU or gemcitabine. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and genotype was determined using the Taqman method. The correlation between genotype and overall survival was analyzed using a Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS: In the 154 of the study's 451 eligible patients with evaluable tissue, genotype distribution followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (ie, 37% had genotype AA, 43% AC, and 20% CC). The RECQ1 variant AC/CC genotype carriers were associated with being node positive compared with the AA carrier (P=.03). The median survival times (95% confidence interval [CI]) for AA, AC, and CC carriers were 20.6 (16.3-26.1), 18.8 (14.2-21.6), and 14.2 (10.3-21.0) months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with the AC/CC genotypes were associated with worse survival than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.23, P=.022). This result seemed slightly stronger for patients on the 5-FU arm (n=82) (HR 1.64, 95% CI 0.99-2.70, P=.055) than for patients on the gemcitabine arm (n=72, HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.81-2.63, P=.21). CONCLUSIONS: Results of this study suggest that the RECQ1 A159C genotype may be a prognostic or predictive factor for resectable pancreatic cancer patients who are treated with adjuvant 5-FU before and after 5-FU-based chemoradiation. Further study is needed in patients treated with gemcitabine to determine whether an association exists.

3 Article None 2018

McWilliams, Robert R / Wieben, Eric D / Chaffee, Kari G / Antwi, Samuel O / Raskin, Leon / Olopade, Olufunmilayo I / Li, Donghui / Highsmith, W Edward / Colon-Otero, Gerardo / Khanna, Lauren G / Permuth, Jennifer B / Olson, Janet E / Frucht, Harold / Genkinger, Jeanine / Zheng, Wei / Blot, William J / Wu, Lang / Almada, Luciana L / Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E / Sicotte, Hugues / Pedersen, Katrina S / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. Mcwilliams.robert@mayo.edu. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee. · Departments of Medicine and Human Genetics, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Departments of Cancer Epidemiology and Gastrointestinal Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida. · Department of Epidemiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Schulze Center for Novel Therapeutics, Division of Oncology Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #30038052.

ABSTRACT:

4 Article Pancreatic cancer risk is modulated by inflammatory potential of diet and ABO genotype: a consortia-based evaluation and replication study. 2018

Antwi, Samuel O / Bamlet, William R / Pedersen, Katrina S / Chaffee, Kari G / Risch, Harvey A / Shivappa, Nitin / Steck, Susan E / Anderson, Kristin E / Bracci, Paige M / Polesel, Jerry / Serraino, Diego / La Vecchia, Carlo / Bosetti, Cristina / Li, Donghui / Oberg, Ann L / Arslan, Alan A / Albanes, Demetrius / Duell, Eric J / Huybrechts, Inge / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Hoover, Robert / Mannisto, Satu / Chanock, Stephen J / Zheng, Wei / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Quirós, José Ramon / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Bruinsma, Fiona / Milne, Roger L / Giles, Graham G / Hébert, James R / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Cancer Prevention and Control Program, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, Aviano (PN), Italy. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute-IDIBELL, Catalan Institute of Oncology-ICO. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, World Health Organization, France. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare Helsinki, Finland. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, Norfolk Place, London, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Pantai Valley, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, and Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Global and Population Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #29800239.

ABSTRACT: Diets with high inflammatory potential are suspected to increase risk for pancreatic cancer (PC). Using pooled analyses, we examined whether this association applies to populations from different geographic regions and population subgroups with varying risks for PC, including variation in ABO blood type. Data from six case-control studies (cases, n = 2414; controls, n = 4528) in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) were analyzed, followed by replication in five nested case-control studies (cases, n = 1268; controls, n = 4215) from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan). Two polymorphisms in the ABO locus (rs505922 and rs8176746) were used to infer participants' blood types. Dietary questionnaire-derived nutrient/food intake was used to compute energy-adjusted dietary inflammatory index (E-DII®) scores to assess inflammatory potential of diet. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using multivariable-adjusted logistic regression. Higher E-DII scores, reflecting greater inflammatory potential of diet, were associated with increased PC risk in PanC4 [ORQ5 versus Q1=2.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.85-2.61, Ptrend < 0.0001; ORcontinuous = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.17-1.24], and PanScan (ORQ5 versus Q1 = 1.23, 95% CI = 0.92-1.66, Ptrend = 0.008; ORcontinuous = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.02-1.15). As expected, genotype-derived non-O blood type was associated with increased PC risk in both the PanC4 and PanScan studies. Stratified analyses of associations between E-DII quintiles and PC by genotype-derived ABO blood type did not show interaction by blood type (Pinteraction = 0.10 in PanC4 and Pinteraction=0.13 in PanScan). The results show that consuming a pro-inflammatory diet and carrying non-O blood type are each individually, but not interactively, associated with increased PC risk.

5 Article Angiogenin/Ribonuclease 5 Is an EGFR Ligand and a Serum Biomarker for Erlotinib Sensitivity in Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Wang, Ying-Nai / Lee, Heng-Huan / Chou, Chao-Kai / Yang, Wen-Hao / Wei, Yongkun / Chen, Chun-Te / Yao, Jun / Hsu, Jennifer L / Zhu, Cihui / Ying, Haoqiang / Ye, Yuanqing / Wang, Wei-Jan / Lim, Seung-Oe / Xia, Weiya / Ko, How-Wen / Liu, Xiuping / Liu, Chang-Gong / Wu, Xifeng / Wang, Huamin / Li, Donghui / Prakash, Laura R / Katz, Matthew H / Kang, Yaan / Kim, Michael / Fleming, Jason B / Fogelman, David / Javle, Milind / Maitra, Anirban / Hung, Mien-Chie. ·Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 108, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 108, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 108, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Experimental Therapeutics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Unit 108, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Center for Molecular Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 404, Taiwan; Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 413, Taiwan. Electronic address: mhung@mdanderson.org. ·Cancer Cell · Pubmed #29606349.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ribonuclease (RNase) is a secreted enzyme critical for host defense. We discover an intrinsic RNase function, serving as a ligand for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a member of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The closely related bovine RNase A and human RNase 5 (angiogenin [ANG]) can trigger oncogenic transformation independently of their catalytic activities via direct association with EGFR. Notably, high plasma ANG level in PDAC patients is positively associated with response to EGFR inhibitor erlotinib treatment. These results identify a role of ANG as a serum biomarker that may be used to stratify patients for EGFR-targeted therapies, and offer insights into the ligand-receptor relationship between RNase and RTK families.

6 Article Plectin-1 Targeted Dual-modality Nanoparticles for Pancreatic Cancer Imaging. 2018

Chen, Xiao / Zhou, Hao / Li, Xiaoshuang / Duan, Na / Hu, Shouyou / Liu, Yongkang / Yue, Yali / Song, Lina / Zhang, Yifen / Li, Donghui / Wang, Zhongqiu. ·Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029, China; Division of Nephrology, Zhongshan Hospital Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China. · Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029, China. · Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029, China. · Department of Pathology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029, China. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030, USA. · Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing 210029, China. Electronic address: zhq2001us@163.com. ·EBioMedicine · Pubmed #29574092.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Biomarker-targeted molecular imaging holds promise for early detection of pancreatic cancer. The aim of this study was to design and evaluate a plectin-1 targeted multi-functional nanoparticle probe for pancreatic cancer imaging. METHODS: 1,2-Distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino(polyethylene glycol) (DSPE-PEG-NH2)-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide (Fe RESULTS: In vitro optical imaging and MRI showed that the targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in MIAPaCa2 and XPA-1 carcinoma cells but not in non-carcinoma MIN6 cells, which was further confirmed by Prussian blue staining. In vivo MRI showed a significant T2 signal reduction. Prussian blue staining further confirmed that the plectin-1 targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in the tumor mass but not in normal pancreatic tissues, or in the liver and kidney, and few nanoparticles were observed in the tumors of mice injected with SPION-Cy7. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that plectin-1 targeted fluorescence and MR dual-functional nanoparticle can visualize pancreatic cancer, and it has great potential to be used with various imaging devices for pancreatic cancer detection.

7 Article Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies five new susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2018

Klein, Alison P / Wolpin, Brian M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Mocci, Evelina / Zhang, Mingfeng / Canzian, Federico / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason W / Jermusyk, Ashley / Zhong, Jun / Chen, Fei / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Arslan, Alan A / Babic, Ana / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Berndt, Sonja I / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Brais, Lauren / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas / Buring, Julie / Campa, Daniele / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Chaffee, Kari G / Chung, Charles C / Cleary, Sean / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dijk, Frederike / Duell, Eric J / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gallinger, Steven / M Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giles, Graham G / Giovannucci, Edward / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hackert, Thilo / Haiman, Christopher / Hartge, Patricia / Hasan, Manal / Hegyi, Peter / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Herman, Joseph / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Hung, Rayjean J / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Janout, Vladimir / Kaaks, Rudolf / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Kooperberg, Charles / Kulke, Matthew H / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert J / Laheru, Daniel / Landi, Stefano / Lawlor, Rita T / Lee, I-Min / LeMarchand, Loic / Lu, Lingeng / Malats, Núria / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Neale, Rachel E / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Patel, Alpa V / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scelo, Ghislaine / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra / Smith, Jill P / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Tavano, Francesca / Thornquist, Mark D / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vashist, Yogesh / Visvanathan, Kala / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wentzensen, Nicolas / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Kraft, Peter / Li, Donghui / Chanock, Stephen / Obazee, Ofure / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, 06520, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21287, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1×5, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, 94158, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), 69372, Lyon, France. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), 3720 BA, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, 3584 CX, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, 00185, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, 20132, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, 21702, USA. · Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2L7, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3M7, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, 08908, Spain. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, 65653, Brno, Czech Republic. · Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, CT, 06510, USA. · Department of Translational Research and The New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, 56126, Pisa, Italy. · Division of Aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Boston VA Healthcare System, Boston, MA, 02132, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 106 79, Athens, Greece. · Cancer Epidemiology and Intelligence Division, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, 3010, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, 3004, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · SWOG Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, 98109, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, 90032, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77230, USA. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, 6725, Szeged, Hungary. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21231, USA. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, Charles University, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, 150 06, Prague 5, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, 30303, USA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, 02-776, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, 701 03, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Olomouc, 771 47, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), 69120, Heidelberg, Germany. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 0SP, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 44195, USA. · ISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08003, Barcelona, Spain. · Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, 44307, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, 37134, Verona, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, 96813, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), 28029, Madrid, Spain. · CIBERONC, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Carrara, 54033, Italy. · Department of Public Health Solutions, National Institute for Health and Welfare, 00271, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital, 775 20, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4029, Australia. · Department of General Surgery, University of Heidelburg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padua, 35124, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, 40138, Bologna, Italy. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre-CNIO, 28029, Madrid, Spain. · Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08002, Barcelona, Spain. · Centre de Recherche en Épidémiologie et Santé des Populations (CESP, Inserm U1018), Facultés de Medicine, Université Paris-Saclay, UPS, UVSQ, Gustave Roussy, 94800, Villejuif, France. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, 37232, USA. · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University, Washington, 20057, USA. · Laboratory for Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, 323 00, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, 901 85, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, 90-647, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", 71013, San Giovanni Rotondo, FG, Italy. · Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, 94612, USA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, 21205, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 142 20, Prague 4, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Environmental Health, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, 14214, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, 38105, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA. · Perlmutter Cancer Center, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #29422604.

ABSTRACT: In 2020, 146,063 deaths due to pancreatic cancer are estimated to occur in Europe and the United States combined. To identify common susceptibility alleles, we performed the largest pancreatic cancer GWAS to date, including 9040 patients and 12,496 controls of European ancestry from the Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium (PanScan) and the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Here, we find significant evidence of a novel association at rs78417682 (7p12/TNS3, P = 4.35 × 10

8 Article The Association of Recently Diagnosed Diabetes and Long-term Diabetes With Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients: A Pooled Analysis. 2018

Jeon, Christie Y / Li, Donghui / Cleary, Sean / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Bosetti, Cristina / La Vecchia, Carlo / Porta, Miquel / Toriola, Adetunji T / Hung, Rayjean J / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29401167.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: It is unclear whether long-standing diabetes or new-onset pancreatogenic diabetes contributes to poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: We investigated the influence of diabetes diagnosed shortly before PDAC and long-term diabetes on overall survival in 2792 PDAC patients who had participated in 3 PDAC case-control studies in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. There were 300 patients with long-term diabetes of more than 3 years' duration (11%) and 418 patients with recently diagnosed diabetes of 3-year duration or less (15%). We performed Cox regression to determine the association of long-term diabetes and recently diagnosed diabetes with overall survival, adjusting for study site, age, sex, race, stage of disease, surgery, chemotherapy, smoking history, and body mass index at diagnosis. RESULTS: In the overall population, neither long-term diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.26) nor recently diagnosed diabetes (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.94-1.18) was associated with shorter survival. When stratified by stage of disease, long-term diabetes was associated with 42% increase in rate of death in persons with resectable PDAC (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.13-1.78), whereas it was not associated with survival in PDAC patients with more advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Long-term diabetes was associated with increased rate of death in patients with resectable PDAC.

9 Article Downregulation of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K (HERV-K) Viral 2017

Li, Ming / Radvanyi, Laszlo / Yin, Bingnan / Li, Jia / Chivukula, Raghavender / Lin, Kevin / Lu, Yue / Shen, JianJun / Chang, David Z / Li, Donghui / Johanning, Gary L / Wang-Johanning, Feng. ·Viral Oncology Program, Center for Cancer and Metabolism, SRI International, Menlo Park, California. · EMD Serono Research and Development Institute, Billerica, Massachusetts. · Department of Inflammation and Epigenetics, Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas. · Department of Epigenetics and Molecular Carcinogenesis, Science Park, the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, Texas. · Virginia Oncology Associates, Newport News, Virginia. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Viral Oncology Program, Center for Cancer and Metabolism, SRI International, Menlo Park, California. feng.wang-johanning@sri.com. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #28679769.

ABSTRACT:

10 Article Diabetes, Pancreatogenic Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Andersen, Dana K / Korc, Murray / Petersen, Gloria M / Eibl, Guido / Li, Donghui / Rickels, Michael R / Chari, Suresh T / Abbruzzese, James L. ·Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Division of Endocrinology, Department of Medicine, and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, and Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center and Pancreatic Cancer Signature Center, Indianapolis, IN. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC james.abbruzzese@duke.edu. ·Diabetes · Pubmed #28507210.

ABSTRACT: The relationships between diabetes and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) are complex. Longstanding type 2 diabetes (T2DM) is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but increasing epidemiological data point to PDAC as also a cause of diabetes due to unknown mechanisms. New-onset diabetes is of particular interest to the oncology community as the differentiation of new-onset diabetes caused by PDAC as distinct from T2DM may allow for earlier diagnosis of PDAC. To address these relationships and raise awareness of the relationships between PDAC and diabetes, a symposium entitled Diabetes, Pancreatogenic Diabetes, and Pancreatic Cancer was held at the American Diabetes Association's 76th Scientific Sessions in June 2016. This article summarizes the data presented at that symposium, describing the current understanding of the interrelationships between diabetes, diabetes management, and pancreatic cancer, and identifies areas where additional research is needed.

11 Article Genetic polymorphisms associated with pancreatic cancer survival: a genome-wide association study. 2017

Tang, Hongwei / Wei, Peng / Chang, Ping / Li, Yanan / Yan, Dong / Liu, Chang / Hassan, Manal / Li, Donghui. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28470677.

ABSTRACT: Previous findings on the association of genetic factors and pancreatic cancer survival are limited and inconsistent. In a two-stage study, we analyzed the existing genome-wide association study dataset of 868 pancreatic cancer patients from MD Anderson Cancer Center in relation to overall survival using Cox regression. Top hits were selected for replication in another 820 patients from the same institution using the Taqman genotyping method. Functional annotation, pathway analysis and gene expression analysis were conducted using existing software and databases. We discovered genome-wide significant associations of patient survival with three imputed SNPs which, in complete LD (r

12 Article RNA sequencing analyses reveal novel differentially expressed genes and pathways in pancreatic cancer. 2017

Mao, Yixiang / Shen, Jianjun / Lu, Yue / Lin, Kevin / Wang, Huamin / Li, Yanan / Chang, Ping / Walker, Mary G / Li, Donghui. ·Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215007, China. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Shanghai 200032, China. · Department of Epigenetics and Molecular Carcinogenesis, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Smithville, Texas 78957, USA. · Department of Pathology and Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #28418924.

ABSTRACT: Gene expression microarrays have identified many tumor markers and therapeutic targets for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, microarray profilings have limited sensitivity and are prone to cross-hybridization between homologous DNA fragments. Here, we perform a transcriptome analysis of paired tumor and adjacent benign pancreatic tissues from 10 patients who underwent resection for PDAC. We identify a total of 2736 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with false discovery rate less than 0.05, including 1554 upregulated, 1182 downregulated, and 6 microRNAs (miR-614, miR-217, miR-27b, miR-4451, miR-3609, and miR-612). Overexpression of five DEGs, i.e. KRT16, HOXA10, CDX1, SI, and SERPINB5 in tumors is confirmed by RT-PCR in 20 additional tissues. Overexpression of KRT16 in PDAC is also verified on protein level. In addition, top canonical pathways such as granulocyte adhesion and diapedesis pathway have been identified. Our study represents a comprehensive characterization of the PDAC transcriptome and provides insight to the mechanisms of pancreatic carcinogenesis and potential biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for pancreatic cancer.

13 Article Effect of NR5A2 inhibition on pancreatic cancer stem cell (CSC) properties and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers. 2017

Luo, Zhaofan / Li, Yanan / Zuo, Mingxin / Liu, Chang / Tian, Weihua / Yan, Dong / Wang, Huamin / Li, Donghui. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Translational and Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. ·Mol Carcinog · Pubmed #27996162.

ABSTRACT: NR5A2 (aka LRH-1) has been identified as a pancreatic cancer susceptibility gene with missing biological link. This study aims to demonstrate expression and potential role of NR5A2 in pancreatic cancer. NR5A2 expression was quantified in resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and the normal adjacent tissues of 134 patients by immunohistochemistry. The intensity and extent of NR5A2 staining was quantified and analyzed in association with overall survival (OS). The impact of NR5A2 knockdown on pancreatic cancer stem cell (CSC) properties and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers was examined in cancer cells using RT-PCR and Western Blot. NR5A2 was overexpressed in pancreatic tumors, the IHC-staining H score (mean ± SE) was 96.4 ± 8.3 in normal versus 137.9 ± 8.2 in tumor tissues (P < 0.0001). Patients with a higher NR5A2 expression had a median survival time 18.4 months compared to 23.7 months for those with low IHC H scores (P = 0.019). The hazard ratio of death (95% confidence interval) was 1.60 (1.07-2.41) after adjusting for disease stage and tumor grade (P = 0.023). NR5A2 was highly expressed in pancreatic cancer sphere forming cells. NR5A2-inhibition by siRNA was associated with reduced sphere formation and decreased levels of CSCs markers NANOG, OCT4, LIN28B, and NOTCH1. NR5A2 knockdown also resulted in reduced expression of FGB, MMP2, MMP3, MMMP9, SNAIL, and TWIST, increased expression of epithelial markers E-cadherin and β-catenin, and a lower expression of mesenchymal marker Vimentin. Taken together, our findings suggest that NR5A2 could play a role in CSC stemness and EMT in pancreatic cancer, which may contribute to the worse clinical outcome.

14 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

15 Article Menstrual and Reproductive Factors, Hormone Use, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Analysis From the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2016

Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Zhang, Wei / Olson, Sara H / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert / Baghurst, Peter A / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Foretová, Lenka / Gallinger, Steven / Holcatova, Ivana / Janout, Vladimír / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lagiou, Pagona / Li, Donghui / Miller, Anthony B / Serraino, Diego / Zatonski, Witold / Risch, Harvey A / Duell, Eric J. ·From the *Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; †Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute and Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; §Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; ∥Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; ¶University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; #National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven; **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; ††Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; ‡‡Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; §§Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic; ∥∥University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ¶¶Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague; ##Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; ***National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; †††Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; ‡‡‡Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; §§§Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece; ∥∥∥Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; ¶¶¶M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX; ###Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ****Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy; ††††Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland; and ‡‡‡‡Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27088489.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the relation between menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormones, and risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Eleven case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium took part in the present study, including in total 2838 case and 4748 control women. Pooled estimates of odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a 2-step logistic regression model and adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: An inverse OR was observed in women who reported having had hysterectomy (ORyesvs.no, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.91), remaining significant in postmenopausal women and never-smoking women, adjusted for potential PC confounders. A mutually adjusted model with the joint effect for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hysterectomy showed significant inverse associations with PC in women who reported having had hysterectomy with HRT use (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Our large pooled analysis suggests that women who have had a hysterectomy may have reduced risk of PC. However, we cannot rule out that the reduced risk could be due to factors or indications for having had a hysterectomy. Further investigation of risk according to HRT use and reason for hysterectomy may be necessary.

16 Article Survivin-targeted nanoparticles for pancreatic tumor imaging in mouse model. 2016

Wang, Zhongqiu / Tong, Mingmin / Chen, Xiao / Hu, Shouyou / Yang, Zhijian / Zhang, Yu / Zhou, Hao / Wu, Yuefei / Li, Xiaoshuang / Li, Donghui. ·Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China. Electronic address: zhq2001us@163.com. · Department of Radiology, Suzhou Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Suzhou, China. · Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China. · Department of Oncology, Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, China. · Nanjing Origin Biosciences Inc., Nanjing, China. · State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Jiangsu Laboratory for Biomaterials and Devices, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, China. · Department of Radiology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Nanomedicine · Pubmed #26995092.

ABSTRACT: We investigated the potential of targeting survivin, an inhibitor of apoptosis, in visualize pancreatic tumor in mouse model using targeted magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Chitosan-coated MNPS and survivin antisense oligonucleotide(ASON) were conjugated to give Sur-MNPs. Accumulations of targeted, non-targeted nanoparticles or nonsense oligonucleotide-MNPs (NSON-MNPs) in the liver, spleen, kidney and tumors were determined. Targeted nanoparticles were highly accumulated in BxPC-3 cells but not in non-cancer cells. In vivo MRI showed a significant T2 signal reduction in tumors of mice injected with targeted nanoparticles but slight signal change in tumors of mice injected with non-targeted nanoparticles or NSON-MNPs. Prussian blue staining demonstrated highly accumulated Sur-MNPs in tumor mass compared with normal pancreatic, kidney and liver tissues. Our data show that the MNPs functionalized with ASON lead to the targeted localization in pancreatic tumors. Survivin targeted nanoparticles could be used for detection of pancreatic tumors.

17 Article Risk Factors for Early-Onset and Very-Early-Onset Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma: A Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4) Analysis. 2016

McWilliams, Robert R / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Bamlet, William R / Petersen, Gloria M / Li, Donghui / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Herbert / Fontham, Elizabeth T H / Luckett, Brian / Bosetti, Cristina / Negri, Eva / La Vecchia, Carlo / Talamini, Renato / Bueno de Mesquita, H Bas / Bracci, Paige / Gallinger, Steven / Neale, Rachel E / Lowenfels, Albert B. ·From the *Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; †Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy; ‡Division of Biostatistics, Mayo Clinic; §Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; ∥Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; ¶Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT; #Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; **Louisiana State University School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA; ††Tulane School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA; ‡‡Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche "Mario Negri," and §§Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; ∥∥S.O.C. Epidemiologia e Biostatistica, Centro di Riferimento Oncologico, IRCCS, Aviano (PN), Italy; ¶¶National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands; School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; ##Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; ***Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; †††Cancer and Population Studies Group, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia; and ‡‡‡Department of Surgery, Department of Family Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26646264.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: While pancreatic cancer (PC) most often affects older adults, to date, there has been no comprehensive assessment of risk factors among PC patients younger than 60 years. METHODS: We defined early-onset PC (EOPC) and very-early-onset PC (VEOPC) as diagnosis of PC in patients younger than 60 and 45 years, respectively. We pooled data from 8 case-control studies, including 1954 patients with EOPC and 3278 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Logistic regression analysis was performed to identify associations with EOPC and VEOPC. RESULTS: Family history of PC, diabetes mellitus, smoking, obesity, and pancreatitis were associated with EOPC. Alcohol use equal to or greater than 26 g daily also was associated with increased risk of EOPC (odds ratio, 1.49; 95% confidence interval, 1.21-1.84), and there appeared to be a dose- and age-dependent effect of alcohol on risk. The point estimate for risk of VEOPC was an odds ratio of 2.18 (95% confidence interval, 1.17-4.09). CONCLUSIONS: The established risk factors for PC, including smoking, diabetes, family history of PC, and obesity, also apply to EOPC. Alcohol intake appeared to have an age-dependent effect; the strongest association was with VEOPC.

18 Article ABO non-O type as a risk factor for thrombosis in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2015

Li, Donghui / Pise, Mayurika N / Overman, Michael J / Liu, Chang / Tang, Hongwei / Vadhan-Raj, Saroj / Abbruzzese, James L. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Department of Sarcoma Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. ·Cancer Med · Pubmed #26275671.

ABSTRACT: ABO blood type has previously been identified as a risk factor for thrombosis and pancreatic cancer (PC). The aim of the study is to demonstrate the associations between ABO blood type and other clinical factors with the risk of thromboembolism (TE) in patients with PC. We conducted a retrospective study in 670 patients with pathologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. Clinical information was retrieved from medical records. ABO blood type was determined serologically and/or genetically. Logistic regression models, Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and Cox proportional hazard regression models were employed in data analysis. The incidence of TE was 35.2% in 670 patients who did not have TE prior to cancer diagnosis. Pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) consisted 44.1% of the TE events. Non-O blood type, pancreatic body/tail tumors, previous use of antithrombotic medication, and obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2) ) were significant predictors for TE in general. Blood type A and AB, low hemoglobin level (≤ 10 g/dL), obesity, metastatic tumor, and pancreatic body/tail tumors were significant predictors for PE and DVT. Patients with metastatic tumor or pancreatic body/tail tumors had a much higher frequency of early TE events (≤ 3 months after cancer diagnosis); and early TE occurrence was a significant independent predictor for increased risk of death. These observations suggest that ABO non-O blood type is an independent predictor for TE in PC. A better understanding of the risk factors for TE in PC may help to identify patients who are most likely to benefit from prophylactic anticoagulation therapy.

19 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

20 Article TERT gene harbors multiple variants associated with pancreatic cancer susceptibility. 2015

Campa, Daniele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Pacetti, Paola / Vodicka, Pavel / Cleary, Sean P / Capurso, Gabriele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Werner, Jens / Gazouli, Maria / Butterbach, Katja / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Giese, Nathalia / Petersen, Gloria M / Fogar, Paola / Wang, Zhaoming / Bassi, Claudio / Ryska, Miroslav / Theodoropoulos, George E / Kooperberg, Charles / Li, Donghui / Greenhalf, William / Pasquali, Claudio / Hackert, Thilo / Fuchs, Charles S / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Funel, Niccola / Dieffenbach, Aida Karina / Wareham, Nicholas J / Buring, Julie / Holcátová, Ivana / Costello, Eithne / Zambon, Carlo-Federico / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Risch, Harvey A / Kraft, Peter / Bracci, Paige M / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Hartge, Patricia / Strobel, Oliver / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Visvanathan, Kala / Arslan, Alan A / Pedrazzoli, Sergio / Souček, Pavel / Gioffreda, Domenica / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Scarpa, Aldo / Mambrini, Andrea / Jacobs, Eric J / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Klein, Alison / Tavano, Francesca / Bambi, Franco / Landi, Stefano / Austin, Melissa A / Vodickova, Ludmila / Brenner, Hermann / Chanock, Stephen J / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Piepoli, Ada / Cantore, Maurizio / Zheng, Wei / Wolpin, Brian M / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Canzian, Federico. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Surgical and Oncological Department, Pancreas Institute - University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague and Central Military Hospital, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1st Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology (DISCOG), University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital in Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · MRC Epidemiology Unit, Institute of Metabolic Science, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Divisions of Preventive Medicine and Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. · Division of Epidemiology, Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Environmental Medicine, and Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY. · Surgical Clinic 4, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo Della Sofferenza,", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA. · Department of Medicine and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25940397.

ABSTRACT: A small number of common susceptibility loci have been identified for pancreatic cancer, one of which is marked by rs401681 in the TERT-CLPTM1L gene region on chromosome 5p15.33. Because this region is characterized by low linkage disequilibrium, we sought to identify whether additional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) could be related to pancreatic cancer risk, independently of rs401681. We performed an in-depth analysis of genetic variability of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA component (TERC) genes, in 5,550 subjects with pancreatic cancer and 7,585 controls from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and the PanScan consortia. We identified a significant association between a variant in TERT and pancreatic cancer risk (rs2853677, odds ratio = 0.85; 95% confidence interval = 0.80-0.90, p = 8.3 × 10(-8)). Additional analysis adjusting rs2853677 for rs401681 indicated that the two SNPs are independently associated with pancreatic cancer risk, as suggested by the low linkage disequilibrium between them (r(2) = 0.07, D' = 0.28). Three additional SNPs in TERT reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing: rs2736100 (p = 3.0 × 10(-5) ), rs4583925 (p = 4.0 × 10(-5) ) and rs2735948 (p = 5.0 × 10(-5) ). In conclusion, we confirmed that the TERT locus is associated with pancreatic cancer risk, possibly through several independent variants.

21 Article Vitamin D metabolic pathway genes and pancreatic cancer risk. 2015

Arem, Hannah / Yu, Kai / Xiong, Xiaoqin / Moy, Kristin / Freedman, Neal D / Mayne, Susan T / Albanes, Demetrius / Arslan, Alan A / Austin, Melissa / Bamlet, William R / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige / Canzian, Federico / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steve / Giles, Graham G / Goggins, Michael / Goodman, Phyllis J / Hartge, Patricia / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Henderson, Brian / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison / Klein, Eric / Kolonel, Laurence N / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Männistö, Satu / McCullough, Marjorie L / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Peters, Ulrike / Petersen, Gloria M / Porta, Miquel / Severi, Gianluca / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Maeder, Dennis / Brotzman, Michelle / Risch, Harvey / Sampson, Joshua N / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, United States of America. · Information Management Systems, Inc., Calverton, Maryland, United States of America. · Yale School of Public Health/Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut, United States of America. · Departments of Population Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology (Obs/Gyn) and Environmental Medicine, New York University, New York, New York, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, United States of America. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States of America. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria and Centre for MEGA Epidemiology, School of Population Health, the University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia. · Departments of Oncology, Pathology and Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Cleveland Clinic, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · MD Mercy, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. · Department of Preventative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, United States of America. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, United States of America. · GroupHealth Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States of America. · University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Manoa, Hawaii, United States of America. · Molecular Pathology Program, Spanish National Cancer Research Center, Madrid, Spain. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States of America. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), and School of Medicine, Barcelona Spain. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, and Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States of America. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, United States of America. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25799011.

ABSTRACT: Evidence on the association between vitamin D status and pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. This inconsistency may be partially attributable to variation in vitamin D regulating genes. We selected 11 vitamin D-related genes (GC, DHCR7, CYP2R1, VDR, CYP27B1, CYP24A1, CYP27A1, RXRA, CRP2, CASR and CUBN) totaling 213 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and examined associations with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study included 3,583 pancreatic cancer cases and 7,053 controls from the genome-wide association studies of pancreatic cancer PanScans-I-III. We used the Adaptive Joint Test and the Adaptive Rank Truncated Product statistic for pathway and gene analyses, and unconditional logistic regression for SNP analyses, adjusting for age, sex, study and population stratification. We examined effect modification by circulating vitamin D concentration (≤50, >50 nmol/L) for the most significant SNPs using a subset of cohort cases (n = 713) and controls (n = 878). The vitamin D metabolic pathway was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (p = 0.830). Of the individual genes, none were associated with pancreatic cancer risk at a significance level of p<0.05. SNPs near the VDR (rs2239186), LRP2 (rs4668123), CYP24A1 (rs2762932), GC (rs2282679), and CUBN (rs1810205) genes were the top SNPs associated with pancreatic cancer (p-values 0.008-0.037), but none were statistically significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Associations between these SNPs and pancreatic cancer were not modified by circulating concentrations of vitamin D. These findings do not support an association between vitamin D-related genes and pancreatic cancer risk. Future research should explore other pathways through which vitamin D status might be associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

22 Article Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1A (HNF1A) as a possible tumor suppressor in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Luo, Zhaofan / Li, Yanan / Wang, Huamin / Fleming, Jason / Li, Min / Kang, Yaan / Zhang, Ran / Li, Donghui. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, United States of America. · The Vivian L. Smith Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Texas Medical School, Houston, Texas, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25793983.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: HNF1A (Hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 alpha) is a transcription factor that is known to regulate pancreatic differentiation and maintain homeostasis of endocrine pancreas. Recently, genome-wide association studies have implicated HNF1A as a susceptibility gene for pancreatic cancer. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanism of HNF1A in pancreatic carcinogenesis remains unclear. METHODS: Using RT-PCR, Western blot and immunohistochemistry methods, we examined HNF1A gene expression in eight pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and in paired tumor and normal tissue samples from patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. We knocked down the HNF1A gene expression in two cancer cell lines using three siRNA sequences. The impacts on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and cell cycle as well as the phosphorylation of Akt signaling transduction proteins were examined using ATP assay, flow cytometry and Western blot. RESULTS: HNF1A was expressed in three out of eight pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines and the level of HNF1A mRNA and protein expression was significantly lower in tumors than in normal adjacent tissues by both RT-PCR and Western Blot analyses. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the level of HNF1A expression was significantly lower in tumor tissues than in non-tumor tissues. Selective blocking of HNF1A by specific siRNA conferred a 2-fold higher rate of cell proliferation, 20% increased S phase and G2 phase cells, and 30-40% reduced apoptosis in pancreatic cancer cell lines. We further demonstrated that HNF1A knockdown activated Akt and its downstream target, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pancreatic cancer cells. CONCLUSION: These observations provide experimental evidence supporting a possible tumor suppressor role of HNF1A in pancreatic cancer.

23 Article BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, and CDKN2A mutations in familial pancreatic cancer: a PACGENE study. 2015

Zhen, David B / Rabe, Kari G / Gallinger, Steven / Syngal, Sapna / Schwartz, Ann G / Goggins, Michael G / Hruban, Ralph H / Cote, Michele L / McWilliams, Robert R / Roberts, Nicholas J / Cannon-Albright, Lisa A / Li, Donghui / Moyes, Kelsey / Wenstrup, Richard J / Hartman, Anne-Renee / Seminara, Daniela / Klein, Alison P / Petersen, Gloria M. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Divison of General Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Oncology, Karmanos Cancer Institute and Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, USA. · The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · 1] The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Department of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA [2] Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Division of Genetic Epidemiology, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc., Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. ·Genet Med · Pubmed #25356972.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Familial pancreatic cancer kindreds contain at least two affected first-degree relatives. Comprehensive data are needed to assist clinical risk assessment and genetic testing. METHODS: Germ-line DNA samples from 727 unrelated probands with positive family history (521 met criteria for familial pancreatic cancer) were tested in compliance with the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (including analysis of deletions and rearrangements), PALB2, and CDKN2A. We compared prevalence of deleterious mutations between familial pancreatic cancer probands and nonfamilial pancreatic cancer probands (kindreds containing at least two affected biological relatives, but not first-degree relatives). We also examined the impact of family history on breast and ovarian cancers and melanoma. RESULTS: Prevalence of deleterious mutations (excluding variants of unknown significance) among familial pancreatic cancer probands was: BRCA1, 1.2%; BRCA2, 3.7%; PALB2, 0.6%; and CDKN2A, 2.5%. Four novel deleterious mutations were detected. Familial pancreatic cancer probands carry more mutations in the four genes (8.0%) than nonfamilial pancreatic cancer probands (3.5%) (odds ratio: 2.40; 95% confidence interval: 1.06-5.44; P = 0.03). The probability of testing positive for deleterious mutations in any of the four genes ranges up to 10.4%, depending on family history of cancers. BRCA2 and CDKN2A account for the majority of mutations in familial pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSION: Genetic testing of multiple relevant genes in probands with a positive family history is warranted, particularly for familial pancreatic cancer.

24 Article Functional logistic regression approach to detecting gene by longitudinal environmental exposure interaction in a case-control study. 2014

Wei, Peng / Tang, Hongwei / Li, Donghui. ·Division of Biostatistics and Human Genetics Center, The University of Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, United States of America. ·Genet Epidemiol · Pubmed #25219575.

ABSTRACT: Most complex human diseases are likely the consequence of the joint actions of genetic and environmental factors. Identification of gene-environment (G × E) interactions not only contributes to a better understanding of the disease mechanisms, but also improves disease risk prediction and targeted intervention. In contrast to the large number of genetic susceptibility loci discovered by genome-wide association studies, there have been very few successes in identifying G × E interactions, which may be partly due to limited statistical power and inaccurately measured exposures. Although existing statistical methods only consider interactions between genes and static environmental exposures, many environmental/lifestyle factors, such as air pollution and diet, change over time, and cannot be accurately captured at one measurement time point or by simply categorizing into static exposure categories. There is a dearth of statistical methods for detecting gene by time-varying environmental exposure interactions. Here, we propose a powerful functional logistic regression (FLR) approach to model the time-varying effect of longitudinal environmental exposure and its interaction with genetic factors on disease risk. Capitalizing on the powerful functional data analysis framework, our proposed FLR model is capable of accommodating longitudinal exposures measured at irregular time points and contaminated by measurement errors, commonly encountered in observational studies. We use extensive simulations to show that the proposed method can control the Type I error and is more powerful than alternative ad hoc methods. We demonstrate the utility of this new method using data from a case-control study of pancreatic cancer to identify the windows of vulnerability of lifetime body mass index on the risk of pancreatic cancer as well as genes that may modify this association.

25 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

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