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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by D. Li
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, D. Li wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial A phase II, open-label, multicenter study to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CO-1.01 as second-line therapy for gemcitabine-refractory patients with stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma and negative tumor hENT1 expression. 2014

Li, D / Pant, S / Ryan, D P / Laheru, D / Bahary, N / Dragovich, T / Hosein, P J / Rolfe, L / Saif, M W / LaValle, J / Yu, K H / Lowery, M A / Allen, A / O'Reilly, E M. ·Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Peggy and Charles Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center, Oklahoma City, OK, USA. · Massachussetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · The Sydney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD, USA. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. · University of Arizona Cancer Center, Tucson, AZ, USA. · Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Miami, FL, USA. · Clovis Oncology, Cambridge, UK; Clovis Oncology, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. Electronic address: oreillye@mskcc.org. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25278310.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nucleotide transporters such as human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) play a major role in transporting gemcitabine into cells. CO-1.01 (gemcitabine-5'-elaidate) is a novel cytotoxic agent consisting of a fatty acid derivative of gemcitabine, which is transported intracellularly independent of hENT1. CO-1.01 was postulated to have efficacy as a second-line treatment in gemcitabine-refractory pancreatic adenocarcinoma in patients with negative tumor hENT1 expression. METHODS: Eligibility criteria included patients with either a newly procured or archival biopsy tumor confirming the absence of hENT1 and either gemcitabine-refractory metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma or with progression of disease following resection during or within 3 months of adjuvant gemcitabine therapy. Patients were treated with intravenous infusion of CO-1.01 dosed at 1250 mg/m(2) on Days 1, 8, and 15 of a 4-week cycle. The primary end point was disease control rate (DCR). RESULTS: Nineteen patients were enrolled of which 18 patients were evaluable for efficacy assessment. Thirteen patients (68%) had liver metastases, 6 (32%) had lymph node metastases, and 10 (53%) had lung metastases. Two of 18 patients (11%) achieved disease control. The median survival time was 4.3 (95% CI 2.1-8.1) months. All patients experienced at least one treatment-related adverse event with the majority of events being mild or moderate. CONCLUSION: This study did not meet its primary endpoint and no efficacy signal was identified for CO-1.01 in treating progressive metastatic pancreas adenocarcinoma.

2 Article High prevalence of mutant KRAS in circulating exosome-derived DNA from early-stage pancreatic cancer patients. 2017

Allenson, K / Castillo, J / San Lucas, F A / Scelo, G / Kim, D U / Bernard, V / Davis, G / Kumar, T / Katz, M / Overman, M J / Foretova, L / Fabianova, E / Holcatova, I / Janout, V / Meric-Bernstam, F / Gascoyne, P / Wistuba, I / Varadhachary, G / Brennan, P / Hanash, S / Li, D / Maitra, A / Alvarez, H. ·Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Sheikh Ahmed Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Genetic Epidemiology Group International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Department of GI Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Brno, Czech Republic. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banska Bystrica, Banska Bystrica, Slovakia. · Institute of Public Health and Preventive Medicine, 2nd Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Palacky University of Medicine, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ostrava, Ostrava, Czech Republic. · Department of Investigational Cancer Therapeutics and the Institute for Personalized Cancer Therapy, Houston, USA. · Section of Experimental Pathology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA · Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28104621.

ABSTRACT: Background: Exosomes arise from viable cancer cells and may reflect a different biology than circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) shed from dying tissues. We compare exosome-derived DNA (exoDNA) to cfDNA in liquid biopsies of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Patients and methods: Patient samples were obtained between 2003 and 2010, with clinically annotated follow up to 2015. Droplet digital PCR was performed on exoDNA and cfDNA for sensitive detection of KRAS mutants at codons 12/13. A cumulative series of 263 individuals were studied, including a discovery cohort of 142 individuals: 68 PDAC patients of all stages; 20 PDAC patients initially staged with localized disease, with blood drawn after resection for curative intent; and 54 age-matched healthy controls. A validation cohort of 121 individuals (39 cancer patients and 82 healthy controls) was studied to validate KRAS detection rates in early-stage PDAC patients. Primary outcome was circulating KRAS status as detected by droplet digital PCR. Secondary outcomes were disease-free and overall survival. Results: KRAS mutations in exoDNA, were identified in 7.4%, 66.7%, 80%, and 85% of age-matched controls, localized, locally advanced, and metastatic PDAC patients, respectively. Comparatively, mutant KRAS cfDNA was detected in 14.8%, 45.5%, 30.8%, and 57.9% of these individuals. Higher exoKRAS MAFs were associated with decreased disease-free survival in patients with localized disease. In the validation cohort, mutant KRAS exoDNA was detected in 43.6% of early-stage PDAC patients and 20% of healthy controls. Conclusions: Exosomes are a distinct source of tumor DNA that may be complementary to other liquid biopsy DNA sources. A higher percentage of patients with localized PDAC exhibited detectable KRAS mutations in exoDNA than previously reported for cfDNA. A substantial minority of healthy samples demonstrated mutant KRAS in circulation, dictating careful consideration and application of liquid biopsy findings, which may limit its utility as a broad cancer-screening method.

3 Article Dietary acrylamide and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2017

Pelucchi, C / Rosato, V / Bracci, P M / Li, D / Neale, R E / Lucenteforte, E / Serraino, D / Anderson, K E / Fontham, E / Holly, E A / Hassan, M M / Polesel, J / Bosetti, C / Strayer, L / Su, J / Boffetta, P / Duell, E J / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan. · Unit of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Bioinformatics, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, USA. · Population Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Neurosciences, Psychology, Drug Research and Children's Health, University of Florence, Florence. · Unit of Cancer Epidemiology, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, Aviano (PN), Italy. · School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. · Department of Epidemiology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock. · The Tisch Cancer Institute, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #27836886.

ABSTRACT: Background: Occupational exposure to acrylamide was associated with excess mortality from pancreatic cancer, though in the absence of dose-risk relationship. Few epidemiological studies have examined the association between acrylamide from diet and pancreatic cancer risk. Patients and methods: We considered this issue in a combined set of 1975 cases of pancreatic cancer and 4239 controls enrolled in six studies of the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). We calculated pooled odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) by estimating study-specific ORs through multivariate unconditional logistic regression models and pooling the obtained estimates using random-effects models. Results: Compared with the lowest level of estimated dietary acrylamide intake, the pooled ORs were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.79-1.19) for the second, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.71-1.16) for the third, and 0.92 (95% CI, 0.66-1.28) for the fourth (highest) quartile of intake. For an increase of 10 µg/day of acrylamide intake, the pooled OR was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.87-1.06), with heterogeneity between estimates (I2 = 67%). Results were similar across various subgroups, and were confirmed when using a one-stage modelling approach. Conclusions: This PanC4 pooled-analysis found no association between dietary acrylamide and pancreatic cancer.

4 Article Comparison of ILK and ERP29 expressions in benign and malignant pancreatic lesions and their clinicopathological significances in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. 2016

Zhang, K / Yao, H / Yang, Z / Li, D / Yang, L / Zou, Q / Yuan, Y / Miao, X. ·Department of General Surgery, The Fourth People's Hospital of Changde, Changde, 415000, Hunan, People's Republic of China. · Department of General Surgery, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, People's Republic of China. yaohongliang08@outlook.com. · Research Laboratory of Hepatobiliary Diseases, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, People's Republic of China. · Department of Pathology, Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410011, Hunan, People's Republic of China. · Department of Pathology, Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410013, Hunan, People's Republic of China. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #26887611.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly malignant tumor of the pancreas with poor prognosis. The lack of understanding of the molecular mechanisms of PDAC and biomarkers for early diagnosis might be two of the reasons for the poor prognosis of PDAC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: ILK and ERP29 protein expressions in PDAC, peritumoral tissues, benign pancreatic lesions, and normal pancreatic tissues were measured by immunohistochemistry and the clinical and pathological significances of ILK and ERP29 in PDAC were analyzed. RESULTS: The percentages of positive ILK and negative ERP29 expressions were significantly higher in PDAC tumors than in peritumoral tissues, benign pancreatic tissues, and normal pancreatic tissues (P < 0.01). Benign pancreatic lesions with positive ILK and negative ERP29 expressions exhibited dysplasia or intraepithelial neoplasia. The percentage of cases with positive ILK and negative ERP29 expressions was significantly lower in PDAC patients without lymph node metastasis and invasion, and having TNM stage I/II disease than in patients with lymph node metastasis, invasion, and TNM stage III/IV disease (P < 0.05 or P < 0.01). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that positive ILK and negative ERP29 expressions were significantly associated with survival in PDAC patients (P < 0.001). Cox multivariate analysis revealed that positive ILK and negative ERP29 expressions were independent poor prognosis factors in PDAC patients. CONCLUSIONS: Positive ILK and negative ERP29 expressions are associated with the progression of PDAC and poor prognosis in patients with PDAC.

5 Article Minimally invasive genomic and transcriptomic profiling of visceral cancers by next-generation sequencing of circulating exosomes. 2016

San Lucas, F A / Allenson, K / Bernard, V / Castillo, J / Kim, D U / Ellis, K / Ehli, E A / Davies, G E / Petersen, J L / Li, D / Wolff, R / Katz, M / Varadhachary, G / Wistuba, I / Maitra, A / Alvarez, H. ·Department of Translational Molecular Pathology Department of Pathology. · Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston. · Department of Pathology The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston. · Department of Pathology. · Avera Institute for Human Genetics, Sioux Falls. · Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology. · Department of Translational Molecular Pathology Department of Pathology Sheikh Ahmed Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA amaitra@mdanderson.org. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26681674.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ability to perform comprehensive profiling of cancers at high resolution is essential for precision medicine. Liquid biopsies using shed exosomes provide high-quality nucleic acids to obtain molecular characterization, which may be especially useful for visceral cancers that are not amenable to routine biopsies. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We isolated shed exosomes in biofluids from three patients with pancreaticobiliary cancers (two pancreatic, one ampullary). We performed comprehensive profiling of exoDNA and exoRNA by whole genome, exome and transcriptome sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2500 sequencer. We assessed the feasibility of calling copy number events, detecting mutational signatures and identifying potentially actionable mutations in exoDNA sequencing data, as well as expressed point mutations and gene fusions in exoRNA sequencing data. RESULTS: Whole-exome sequencing resulted in 95%-99% of the target regions covered at a mean depth of 133-490×. Genome-wide copy number profiles, and high estimates of tumor fractions (ranging from 56% to 82%), suggest robust representation of the tumor DNA within the shed exosomal compartment. Multiple actionable mutations, including alterations in NOTCH1 and BRCA2, were found in patient exoDNA samples. Further, RNA sequencing of shed exosomes identified the presence of expressed fusion genes, representing an avenue for elucidation of tumor neoantigens. CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated high-resolution profiling of the genomic and transcriptomic landscapes of visceral cancers. A wide range of cancer-derived biomarkers could be detected within the nucleic acid cargo of shed exosomes, including copy number profiles, point mutations, insertions, deletions, gene fusions and mutational signatures. Liquid biopsies using shed exosomes has the potential to be used as a clinical tool for cancer diagnosis, therapeutic stratification and treatment monitoring, precluding the need for direct tumor sampling.

6 Article Diabetes, antidiabetic medications, and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2014

Bosetti, C / Rosato, V / Li, D / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Neale, R E / Muscat, J / Anderson, K / Gallinger, S / Olson, S H / Miller, A B / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Scelo, G / Janout, V / Holcatova, I / Lagiou, P / Serraino, D / Lucenteforte, E / Fabianova, E / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Foretova, L / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Prizment, A / Cotterchio, M / Cleary, S / Kurtz, R C / Maisonneuve, P / Trichopoulos, D / Polesel, J / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy. · M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA. · University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano. · Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia Public Health, Women · Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic. · Louisiana State University School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · The Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25057164.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, but the magnitude of the risk and the time-risk relationship are unclear, and there is limited information on the role of antidiabetic medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed individual-level data from 15 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 8305 cases and 13 987 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Overall, 1155 (15%) cases and 1087 (8%) controls reported a diagnosis of diabetes 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis (or interview, for controls), corresponding to an OR of 1.90 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.72-2.09). Consistent risk estimates were observed across strata of selected covariates, including body mass index and tobacco smoking. Pancreatic cancer risk decreased with duration of diabetes, but a significant excess risk was still evident 20 or more years after diabetes diagnosis (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.63). Among diabetics, long duration of oral antidiabetic use was associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69, for ≥15 years). Conversely, insulin use was associated with a pancreatic cancer risk in the short term (OR 5.60, 95% CI 3.75-8.35, for <5 years), but not for longer duration of use (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.53-1.70, for ≥15 years). CONCLUSION: This study provides the most definitive quantification to date of an excess risk of pancreatic cancer among diabetics. It also shows that a 30% excess risk persists for more than two decades after diabetes diagnosis, thus supporting a causal role of diabetes in pancreatic cancer. Oral antidiabetics may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas insulin showed an inconsistent duration-risk relationship.

7 Article Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Duell, E J / Lucenteforte, E / Olson, S H / Bracci, P M / Li, D / Risch, H A / Silverman, D T / Ji, B T / Gallinger, S / Holly, E A / Fontham, E H / Maisonneuve, P / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Ghadirian, P / Kurtz, R C / Ludwig, E / Yu, H / Lowenfels, A B / Seminara, D / Petersen, G M / La Vecchia, C / Boffetta, P. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22767586.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatitis is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, an unknown fraction of the disease is thought to be a consequence of tumor-related duct obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A pooled analysis of a history of pancreatitis and risk of pancreatic cancer was carried out considering the time interval between diagnoses and potential modification by covariates. Adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from 10 case-control studies (5048 cases of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 10,947 controls) taking part in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). RESULTS: The association between pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer was nearly three-fold at intervals of >2 years between diagnoses (OR: 2.71, 95% CI: 1.96-3.74) and much stronger at intervals of ≤2 years (OR: 13.56, 95% CI: 8.72-21.90) probably reflecting a combination of reverse causation and antecedent misdiagnosis of pancreas cancer as pancreatitis. The younger (<65 years) pancreatic cancer cases showed stronger associations with previous (>2 years) pancreatitis (OR: 3.91, 95% CI: 2.53-6.04) than the older (≥65 years) cases (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.02-2.76; P value for interaction: 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a moderately strong association between pancreatitis (diagnosed before >2 years) and pancreatic cancer, the population attributable fraction was estimated at 1.34% (95% CI: 0.612-2.07%), suggesting that a relatively small proportion of pancreatic cancer might be avoided if pancreatitis could be prevented.

8 Article Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (Panc4). 2012

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Bertuccio, P / Gao, Y T / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22104574.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer and to examine the effects of temporal variables. METHODS: We analyzed data from 12 case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4), including 6507 pancreatic cases and 12 890 controls. We estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) by pooling study-specific ORs using random-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with never smokers, the OR was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3) for former smokers and 2.2 (95% CI 1.7-2.8) for current cigarette smokers, with a significant increasing trend in risk with increasing number of cigarettes among current smokers (OR=3.4 for ≥35 cigarettes per day, P for trend<0.0001). Risk increased in relation to duration of cigarette smoking up to 40 years of smoking (OR=2.4). No trend in risk was observed for age at starting cigarette smoking, whereas risk decreased with increasing time since cigarette cessation, the OR being 0.98 after 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large pooled analysis confirms that current cigarette smoking is associated with a twofold increased risk of pancreatic cancer and that the risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking. Risk of pancreatic cancer reaches the level of never smokers ∼20 years after quitting.

9 Article Alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Lucenteforte, E / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Bosetti, C / Li, D / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Boffetta, P / Duell, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21536662.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol drinking has been related to pancreatic cancer, but the issue is still unsolved. METHODS: To evaluate the role of alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer, we conducted a pooled analysis of 10 case-control studies (5585 cases and 11,827 controls) participating in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. We computed pooled odds ratios (ORs) by estimating study-specific ORs adjusted for selected covariates and pooling them using random effects models. RESULTS: Compared with abstainers and occasional drinkers (< 1 drink per day), we observed no association for light-to-moderate alcohol consumption (≤ 4 drinks per day) and pancreatic cancer risk; however, associations were above unity for higher consumption levels (OR = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2 for subjects drinking ≥ 9 drinks per day). Results did not change substantially when we evaluated associations by tobacco smoking status, or when we excluded participants who reported a history of pancreatitis, or participants whose data were based upon proxy responses. Further, no notable differences in pooled risk estimates emerged across strata of sex, age, race, study type, and study area. CONCLUSION: This collaborative-pooled analysis provides additional evidence for a positive association between heavy alcohol consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

10 Article Cigar and pipe smoking, smokeless tobacco use and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2011

Bertuccio, P / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E T / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Lucenteforte, E / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Bosetti, C / Boffetta, P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21245160.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is the best-characterized risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, data are limited for other tobacco smoking products and smokeless tobacco. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a pooled analysis of cigar and pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco use and risk of pancreatic cancer using data from 11 case-control studies (6056 cases and 11,338 controls) within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). Pooled odds ratios (OR) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by unconditional multiple logistic regression models adjusted for study center and selected covariates. RESULTS: Compared with never tobacco users, the OR for cigar-only smokers was 1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.3), i.e. comparable to that of cigarette-only smokers (OR 1.5; 95% CI 1.4-1.6). The OR was 1.1 (95% CI 0.69-1.6) for pipe-only smokers. There was some evidence of increasing risk with increasing amount of cigar smoked per day (OR 1.82 for ≥ 10 grams of tobacco), although not with duration. The OR for ever smokeless tobacco users as compared with never tobacco users was 0.98 (95% CI 0.75-1.3). CONCLUSION: This collaborative analysis provides evidence that cigar smoking is associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, while no significant association emerged for pipe smoking and smokeless tobacco use.

11 Minor Reply to the letter to the editor 'The link between type 2 diabetes and pancreatic adenocarcinoma is yet to be established' by Rahman and Meeran. 2014

Bosetti, C / Petersen, G M / Li, D / La Vecchia, C / Anonymous3790806. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS-Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy; cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester; · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, USA; · Departments of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25223481.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --