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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Benjamin E. Leiby
Based on 14 articles published since 2009
(Why 14 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Ben Leiby wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pancreatic Cancer-Associated Depression: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. 2018

Barnes, Adam F / Yeo, Theresa P / Leiby, Benjamin / Kay, Abigail / Winter, Jordan M. ·Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. · Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #30199487.

ABSTRACT: The prevalence of major depressive disorder (MDD) in pancreatic cancer (PC) has been reported up to 7 times higher than the general population. Despite repeated studies that show worse quality of life, survival outcomes, and treatment compliance in cancer patients with depression, baseline antidepressant use ranges from 15% to 27%. A meta-analysis of 6 prospective trials specific to PC estimates that 43% of patients with PC experience depression after diagnosis. This is especially alarming in patients with PC, who may experience a prodrome of symptoms including depression and loss of drive. In fact, this prodrome of symptoms may very well be due to an overexpression of indoleamine 2,3-dioxgenase, an enzyme in the kynurenine pathway that leads to serotonin depletion and the buildup of cytotoxic metabolites in the brain. In this literature review, we outline all previous studies pertinent to PC and depression, as well as the molecular underpinnings that may contribute to states of depression, and report on previous randomized control trials in cancer populations that investigate the use of antidepressants to treat depressive symptoms and improve quality of life both prophylactically and after the onset of major depressive disorder. In addition, we detail a case report outlining the precipitous decline in health in 1 patient with PC and depression.

2 Clinical Trial Cytoplasmic HuR Status Predicts Disease-free Survival in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Post-hoc Analysis From the International Phase III ESPAC-3 Clinical Trial. 2018

Tatarian, Talar / Jiang, Wei / Leiby, Benjamin E / Grigoli, Amanda / Jimbo, Masaya / Dabbish, Nooreen / Neoptolemos, John P / Greenhalf, William / Costello, Eithne / Ghaneh, Paula / Halloran, Christopher / Palmer, Daniel / Buchler, Markus / Yeo, Charles J / Winter, Jordan M / Brody, Jonathan R. ·Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary, and Related Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Pathology, Anatomy, and Cell Biology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Institute of Translational Medicine, Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #27893535.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We tested cytoplasmic HuR (cHuR) as a predictive marker for response to chemotherapy by examining tumor samples from the international European Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer-3 trial, in which patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) received either gemcitabine (GEM) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) adjuvant monotherapy. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have implicated the mRNA-binding protein, HuR (ELAVL1), as a predictive marker for PDA treatment response in the adjuvant setting. These studies were, however, based on small cohorts of patients outside of a clinical trial, or a clinical trial in which patients received multimodality therapy with concomitant radiation. METHODS: Tissue samples from 379 patients with PDA enrolled in the European Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer-3 trial were immunolabeled with an anti-HuR antibody and scored for cHuR expression. Patients were dichotomized into groups of high versus low cHuR expression. RESULTS: There was no association between cHuR expression and prognosis in the overall cohort [disease-free survival (DFS), P = 0.44; overall survival, P = 0.41). Median DFS for patients with high cHuR was significantly greater for patients treated with 5-FU compared to GEM [20.1 months, confidence interval (CI): 8.3-36.4 vs 10.9 months, CI: 7.5-14.2; P = 0.04]. Median DFS was similar between the treatment arms in patients with low cHuR (5-FU, 12.8 months, CI: 10.6-14.6 vs GEM, 12.9 months, CI: 11.2-15.4). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with high cHuR-expressing tumors may benefit from 5-FU-based adjuvant therapy as compared to GEM, whereas those patients with low cHuR appear to have no survival advantage with GEM compared with 5-FU. Further studies are needed to validate HuR as a biomarker in both future monotherapy and multiagent regimens.

3 Article Symptom Clusters in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Surgical Resection: Part II. 2018

Burrell, Sherry A / Yeo, Theresa P / Smeltzer, Suzanne C / Leiby, Benjamin E / Lavu, Harish / Kennedy, Eugene P / Yeo, Charles J. ·Villanova University. · Thomas Jefferson University. · NewLink Genetics. · Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. ·Oncol Nurs Forum · Pubmed #29947350.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To explore the relationship between 16 symptom clusters (SCs), clinical and demographic influencing factors, and clinical outcomes over time in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) undergoing surgical resection. SAMPLE & SETTING: 143 patients with stage II PC undergoing surgical resection were recruited to participate in this longitudinal, exploratory study conducted at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center. METHODS & VARIABLES: Quality of life was measured preoperatively and at three, six, and nine months postoperatively. Statistical methods included simple linear and Cox proportional hazard regression. RESULTS: Preoperative pain was significantly associated with the pain-gastrointestinal SC, and preoperative worry was significantly associated with the mood SC. The strongest negative association with emotional well-being across all study time points was found with the preoperative mood SC. The insomnia-digestive problems SC and the nutritional problems SC demonstrated a trend toward poor survival. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Findings provide evidence that preoperative worry and pain are associated with SC severity and that SCs may have a detrimental effect on quality of life and survival in patients with PC undergoing surgical resection.

4 Article Symptom Clusters in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Undergoing Surgical Resection: Part I. 2018

Burrell, Sherry A / Yeo, Theresa P / Smeltzer, Suzanne C / Leiby, Benjamin E / Lavu, Harish / Kennedy, Eugene P / Yeo, Charles J. ·Villanova University. · Thomas Jefferson University. · NewLink Genetics. · Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. ·Oncol Nurs Forum · Pubmed #29947349.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: To describe patient-reported symptoms and symptom clusters in patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) undergoing surgical resection. SAMPLE & SETTING: 143 patients with stage II PC undergoing surgical resection alone or with subsequent adjuvant chemoradiation or chemotherapy were recruited to participate in a nested, longitudinal, exploratory study through convenience sampling techniques from Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center. METHODS & VARIABLES: The Functional Assessment in Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary questionnaire was used to assess 17 PC symptoms preoperatively and at three, six, and nine months postoperatively. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were used to identify symptom clusters. RESULTS: Fatigue, trouble sleeping, poor appetite, trouble digesting food, and weight loss were consistently reported as the most prevalent and severe symptoms. Sixteen distinct symptom clusters were identified within nine months of surgery. Four core symptom clusters persisted over time. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Findings may be used to provide anticipatory patient and family guidance and to inform clinical assessments of symptoms and symptom clusters in this population.

5 Article Pneumonia is associated with a high risk of mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2017

Nagle, Ramzy T / Leiby, Benjamin E / Lavu, Harish / Rosato, Ernest L / Yeo, Charles J / Winter, Jordan M. ·Department of Surgery, The Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary, and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Biostatistics, The Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary, and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, The Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary, and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. Electronic address: Jordan.winter@jefferson.edu. ·Surgery · Pubmed #27836210.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatectomy is associated with a high complication rate that varies between 40-60%. Although many specific complications have been extensively studied, postoperative pneumonia has received little attention. METHODS: Patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (n = 1,090) and distal pancreatectomy (n = 436) from 2002 to 2014 at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital were retrospectively assessed for postoperative pneumonia. Incidence, predictive factors, and outcomes were determined. RESULTS: Pneumonia was diagnosed in 4.3% of patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy and 2.5% after distal pancreatectomy. The majority of the pneumonias were attributed to aspiration (87.2% and 81.8%, respectively). Pneumonias were more frequently severe (Clavien-Dindo grades 4 or 5) in the pancreaticoduodenectomy group compared to the distal pancreatectomy group (55.3% vs 9.1%, P = .006). Post-pancreaticoduodenectomy pneumonia predictors included delayed gastric emptying (odds ratio 8.2, P < .001), oxygen requirement on postoperative day 3 (odds ratio 3.2, P = .005), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (odds ratio 3.1, P = .049). In the post-pancreaticoduodenectomy group, pneumonia was associated with a very high 90-day mortality compared with those who did not have pneumonia (29.8% vs 2.1%, P < .001) and had the largest effect on mortality after pancreaticoduodenectomy (odds ratio 9.6, P < .001). A preoperative risk score model for pneumonia post-pancreaticoduodenectomy was developed. CONCLUSION: Pneumonia after pancreaticoduodenectomy is an uncommon but highly morbid event and is associated with a substantially increased risk of perioperative death.

6 Article The influence of transection site on the development of pancreatic fistula in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy: A review of 294 consecutive cases. 2015

Sell, Naomi M / Pucci, Michael J / Gabale, Salil / Leiby, Benjamin E / Rosato, Ernest L / Winter, Jordan M / Yeo, Charles J / Lavu, Harish. ·Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. Electronic address: harish.lavu@jefferson.edu. ·Surgery · Pubmed #25791028.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic fistula (PF) is a significant cause of morbidity in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy (DP), with an incidence of 15-40%. It remains unclear if the location of pancreatic transection affects the rate of PF occurrence. This study examines the correlation between the transection site of the pancreas during DP and the incidence of PF. METHODS: All cases of DP from October 2005 to January 2012 were reviewed retrospectively from an institutional review board-approved database at the Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Patient demographics and perioperative outcomes were analyzed. The pancreatic transection location was determined by review of operative reports, and then dichotomized into 2 groups: neck/body or tail. PF were graded following the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula guidelines. RESULTS: During the study period, 294 DP were performed with 244 pancreas transections at the neck/body and 50 at the tail. Of the 294 patients, 52 (17.7%) developed a postoperative PF. The incidence of PF after transection at the tail of the pancreas was higher (28%) when compared with transection at the neck/body (15.6%; P = .04). When stratified by PF grade, grade A PF occurred more commonly when transection of the gland was at the tail (22% tail vs 8.2% neck/body; P = .007); however, no difference was found for grade B/C PF (6% tail vs 7.4% neck/body; P = 1). CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that PF occurs more often when the tail is transected during DP, although the majority are low grade and of minimal clinical significance. More severe PF occurred equally between the transection sites.

7 Article A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial on the efficacy of ethanol celiac plexus neurolysis in patients with operable pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma. 2015

Lavu, Harish / Lengel, Harry B / Sell, Naomi M / Baiocco, Joseph A / Kennedy, Eugene P / Yeo, Theresa P / Burrell, Sherry A / Winter, Jordan M / Hegarty, Sarah / Leiby, Benjamin E / Yeo, Charles J. ·Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Pancreas Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA. Electronic address: harish.lavu@jefferson.edu. · Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Pancreas Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA. · School of Nursing, Rutgers University, The State University of New Jersey, Camden, NJ. · Division of Biostatistics, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Pancreas Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #25667135.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Ethanol celiac plexus neurolysis (ECPN) has been shown to be effective in reducing cancer-related pain in patients with locally advanced pancreatic and periampullary adenocarcinoma (PPA). This study examined its efficacy in patients undergoing PPA resection. STUDY DESIGN: There were 485 patients who participated in this prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo controlled trial. Patients were stratified by preoperative pain and disease resectability. They received either ECPN (50% ethanol) or 0.9% normal saline placebo control. The primary endpoint was short- and long-term pain and secondary endpoints included postoperative morbidity, quality of life, and overall survival. RESULTS: Data from 467 patients were analyzed. The primary endpoint, the percentage of PPA patients experiencing a worsening of pain compared with preoperative baseline for resectable patients, was not different between the ethanol and saline groups in either the resectable/pain stratum (22% vs 18%, relative risk [RR] 1.23 [0.34, 4.46]), or the resectable/no pain stratum (37% vs 34%, RR 1.10 [0.67, 1.81]). In multivariable analysis of resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) patients, there was a significant reduction in pain in the resectable/pain group, suggesting that surgical resection of the malignancy alone (independent of ECPN) decreases pain to a significant degree. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we demonstrated a significant reduction in pain after surgical resection of PPA. However, the addition of ECPN did not synergize to result in a further reduction in pain, and in fact, its effect may have been masked by surgical resection. Given this, we cannot recommend the use of ECPN to mitigate cancer-related pain in resectable PPA patients.

8 Article The HYSLAR trial: a prospective randomized controlled trial of the use of a restrictive fluid regimen with 3% hypertonic saline versus lactated Ringers in patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2014

Lavu, Harish / Sell, Naomi M / Carter, Timothy I / Winter, Jordan M / Maguire, David P / Gratch, David M / Berman, Richard A / Feil, Marian G / Grunwald, Zvi / Leiby, Benjamin E / Pequignot, Edward C / Rosato, Ernest L / Yeo, Charles J. ·*Departments of Surgery †Anesthesia ‡Biostatistics, Thomas Jefferson University, Jefferson Pancreas Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #25115420.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: This study was designed to determine whether the volume and type of fluid administered for pancreaticoduodenectomy impacts postoperative outcomes. BACKGROUND: Three percent hypertonic saline (HYS) has been suggested as a means of reducing the volume of fluid required to sustain tissue perfusion in the perioperative period. METHODS: Between May 2011 and November 2013, patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved, single-center, prospective, parallel, randomized controlled trial (NCT 01428050), comparing lactated Ringers (LAR) (15 mL/kg/hr LAR intraoperation, 2 mL/kg/hr LAR postoperation) with HYS (9 mL/kg/hr LAR and 1 mL/kg/hr HYS intraoperation, 1 mL/kg/hr HYS postoperation). RESULTS: A total of 264 patients were randomized. Demographic variables between groups were similar. The HYS patients had a significantly reduced net fluid balance (65 vs 91 mL/kg, P = 0.02). The overall complication rate was reduced in the HYS group (43% vs 54%), with a relative risk of 0.79 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.62-1.02; P = 0.073], factoring stratification for pancreas texture. After adjustment for age and weight, the relative risk was 0.75 [95% CI (0.58-0.96); P = 0.023]. The total number of complications was significantly reduced in the HYS group (93 vs 123), with an incidence rate ratio of 0.74 [95% CI (0.56-0.97); P = 0.027]. After adjustment for age and weight, the incidence rate ratio was 0.69 [95% CI (0.52-0.90); P = 0.0068]. Reoperations, length of stay, readmissions, and 90-day mortality were similar between groups. CONCLUSIONS: A moderately restrictive fluid regimen with HYS resulted in a statistically significant 25% reduction in complications when adjusted for age, weight, and pancreatic texture.

9 Article Tumor recurrence is independent of pancreatic fistula in patients after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2013

Assifi, M Mura / Zhang, Sarah / Leiby, Benjamin E / Pequignot, Edward C / Xia, Brent / Rosato, Ernest / Lavu, Harish / Kennedy, Eugene P / Yeo, Charles J / Berger, Adam C. ·Department of Surgery and the Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #23810574.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recurrence of pancreatic adenocarcinoma after pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) can be increased in patients with pancreatic fistula (PF). The purpose of our study was to determine if a relationship exists between PF and tumor recurrence (both peritoneal and local) in patients after PD for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. STUDY DESIGN: A single-institution, retrospective analysis of 221 patients who underwent PD from January 2001 to December 2009 was conducted. Electronic charts and medical records were queried for tumor characteristics, recurrence, and complications. Presence and grading of PF was determined using the criteria of the International Study Group on Pancreatic Fistula. Data were analyzed using chi-square and Kaplan-Meier survival statistics. RESULTS: There were 114 male and 107 female patients. Mean age was 66 years (range 35 to 91 years). The vast majority (84%) of patients had stage II disease; 143 (65%) had positive lymph nodes (median 2 positive nodes; range 1 to 17 positive nodes). Pancreatic fistula developed in 23 patients (grade A, n = 9; grade B, n = 13; grade C, n = 1; 10.2%). Peritoneal recurrence was noted in 20 patients (9%). Of the 23 patients with PF, peritoneal recurrence developed in 3 (13%). Of the 198 patients without PF, peritoneal recurrence developed in 17 (10%). Local recurrence occurred in 47 patients (21%), 5 (2%) in patients with PF and 42 (21%) in those without PF (p = NS). In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, there was no significant difference in recurrence-free survival (p = 0.4) and overall survival (p = 0.3) for those with PF vs those without PF. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with PF after PD were not found to have a significant increase in local or peritoneal recurrence. Therefore, in this analysis, postoperative PF does not appear to serve as an adverse prognostic marker.

10 Article Splenic vein thrombosis is associated with an increase in pancreas-specific complications and reduced survival in patients undergoing distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic exocrine cancer. 2013

Dedania, Nishi / Agrawal, Nidhi / Winter, Jordan M / Koniaris, Leonidas G / Rosato, Ernest L / Sauter, Patricia K / Leiby, Ben / Pequignot, Edward / Yeo, Charles J / Lavu, Harish. ·Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University, JeffersonPancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #23797883.

ABSTRACT: Distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy (DPS) is the procedure of choice for the surgical treatment of pancreatic exocrine cancer localized to the body and tail of the pancreas. Splenic vein thrombosis (SVT) can occur in patients with malignant pancreatic exocrine tumors secondary to direct tumor invasion or compression of the splenic vein by mass effect. This study examines the effect of preoperative SVT on postoperative outcomes. In this retrospective cohort study, we queried our pancreatic surgery database to identify patients who underwent DPS from October 2005 to June 2011. These cases were evaluated for evidence of preoperative SVT on clinical records and cross-sectional imaging (CT,MRI, endoscopic US). Outcomes for patients with and without SVT were compared. From an overall cohort of 285 consecutive patients who underwent DPS during the study period, data were evaluated for 70 subjects who underwent surgery for pancreatic exocrine cancer (27 with SVT, 43 without SVT). The preoperative demographics and co-morbidities were similar between the groups, except the average age was higher for those without SVT (p<0.05). The median estimated blood loss was significantly higher in the SVT group (675 versus 250 ml, p=<0.001).While the overall morbidity rates were similar between the two groups (48 % SVT versus 56% no SVT, p=NS), the group with SVT had a significantly higher rate of pancreas-specific complications, including pancreatic fistula (33 versus 7 %,p<0.01) and delayed gastric emptying (15 versus 0%, p<0.02). Hospital readmission rates were similar between the groups(30 versus 28 %, p=NS). Patients without SVT had a trend toward longer median survival (40 versus 20.8 months),although the difference was not statistically significant (p=0.1). DPS for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma can be performed safely in patients with SVT, but with higher intraoperative blood loss, increased pancreas-specific complications, and a trend towards lower long-term survival rates. This paper was presented as a poster at the 53rd annual meeting of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract and at the 46th annual meeting of the Pancreas Club, San Diego, CA, May 2012.

11 Article HuR's post-transcriptional regulation of Death Receptor 5 in pancreatic cancer cells. 2012

Pineda, Danielle M / Rittenhouse, David W / Valley, Christopher C / Cozzitorto, Joseph A / Burkhart, Richard A / Leiby, Benjamin / Winter, Jordan M / Weber, Matthew C / Londin, Eric R / Rigoutsos, Isidore / Yeo, Charles J / Gorospe, Myriam / Witkiewicz, Agnieska K / Sachs, Jonathan N / Brody, Jonathan R. ·Department of Surgery, Division of Surgical Research, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, USA. ·Cancer Biol Ther · Pubmed #22785201.

ABSTRACT: Apoptosis is one of the core signaling pathways disrupted in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Death receptor 5 (DR5) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-receptor superfamily that is expressed in cancer cells. Binding of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to DR5 is a potent trigger of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, and numerous clinical trials are based on DR5-targeted therapies for cancer, including PDA. Human antigen R (HuR), an RNA-binding protein, regulates a select number of transcripts under stress conditions. Here we report that HuR translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of PDA cells upon treatment with a DR5 agonist. High doses of DR5 agonist induce cleavage of both HuR and caspase 8. HuR binds to DR5 mRNA at the 5'-untranslated region (UTR) in PDA cells in response to different cancer-associated stressors and subsequently represses DR5 protein expression; silencing HuR augments DR5 protein production by enabling its translation and thus enhances apoptosis. In PDA specimens (n = 53), negative HuR cytoplasmic expression correlated with elevated DR5 expression (odds ratio 16.1, p < 0.0001). Together, these data demonstrate a feedback mechanism elicited by HuR-mediated repression of the key apoptotic membrane protein DR5.

12 Article Is there a role for the quantification of RRM1 and ERCC1 expression in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma? 2012

Valsecchi, Matias E / Holdbrook, Thomas / Leiby, Benjamin E / Pequignot, Edward / Littman, Susan J / Yeo, Charles J / Brody, Jonathan R / Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. Matias.Valsecchi@jeffersonhospital.org ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #22436573.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: RRM1 and ERCC1 overexpression has been extensively investigated as potential predictive markers of tumor sensitivity to conventional chemotherapy agents, most thoroughly in lung cancer. However, data in pancreatic cancer are scarce. METHODS: We investigated the mRNA and protein expression of ERCC1 and RRM1 by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded pancreatic ductal carcinoma (PDA) tissues. The primary outcome investigated was the association between RRM1 and ERCC1 expression and overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS). RESULTS: A total of 94 patients with resected PDA were included in this study. Most of them (87%) received gemcitabine based chemotherapy. Data for OS analysis was available in all cases but only 68% had enough information to estimate DFS. IHC analysis revealed information for 99% (93/94) and 100% of the cases for RRM1 and ERCC1 expression respectively. However, PCR data interpretation was possible in only 49 (52%) and 79 (84%) cases respectively. There was no significant association between high or low expression of either RRM1 or ERCC1, detected by IHC and OS (14.4 vs. 19.9 months; P = 0.5 and 17.1 vs. 19.9; P = 0.83 respectively) or PCR and OS (48.0 vs. 24.1 months; P = 0.21 and 22.0 vs. 16.0 months; P = 0.39 respectively). Similar results were obtained for DFS. CONCLUSIONS: RRM1 and ERCC1 expression does not seem to have a clear predictive or prognostic value in pancreatic cancer. Our data raise some questions regarding the real clinical and practical significance of analyzing these molecules as predictors of outcomes.

13 Article A progressive postresection walking program significantly improves fatigue and health-related quality of life in pancreas and periampullary cancer patients. 2012

Yeo, Theresa P / Burrell, Sherry A / Sauter, Patricia K / Kennedy, Eugene P / Lavu, Harish / Leiby, Benjamin E / Yeo, Charles J. ·Jefferson School of Nursing, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. theresa.yeo@jefferson.edu ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #22321518.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: As patients with pancreas and periampullary cancer (PPC) experience improved survival rates and longevity, the focus shifts toward living life while surviving cancer. Fatigue is the most commonly reported symptom in all cancer patients. Exercise has been found to effectively decrease fatigue levels and improve physical functioning in cancer patients. STUDY DESIGN: One hundred two patients with resected PPC consented to participate in this study and were randomized to either an intervention group (IG) or a usual care group (UCG). Subjects completed visual analog scales, the FACIT-Fatigue Scale and the Short Form-36v2 after surgery and again 3 to 6 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS: Patients in the IG and UCG were comparable with regard to demographics, comorbidities, cancer type and staging, type of resection, preoperative fatigue and pain levels, adjuvant therapy, and baseline walking distance. Patients in the IG had significantly improved scores on the FACIT-Fatigue Scale at study completion, improved fatigue and pain scores, as well as overall physical functioning and mental health composite scores. At study completion, participants in the IG were walking twice as far and were significantly more likely to have continued walking or another form of exercise as compared with the UCG. Using hierarchical cluster analysis, 3 mutually exclusive symptom groupings were identified in the cohort. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis did not indicate an overall survival benefit for the IG. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first prospective, randomized controlled trial to report that participation in a home walking program confers a significant benefit in resected PPC patients with regard to fatigue levels, physical functioning, and health-related quality of life.

14 Article Margin positive pancreaticoduodenectomy is superior to palliative bypass in locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2009

Lavu, Harish / Mascaro, Andres A / Grenda, Dane R / Sauter, Patricia K / Leiby, Benjamin E / Croker, Sean P / Witkiewicz, Agnes / Berger, Adam C / Rosato, Ernest L / Kennedy, Eugene P / Yeo, Charles J. ·Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. harish.lavu@jefferson.edu ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #19760308.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive disease. Surgical resection with negative margins (R0) offers the only opportunity for cure. Patients who have advanced disease that limits the chance for R0 surgical resection may undergo margin positive (MP) pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD), palliative surgical bypass (PB), celiac plexus neurolysis alone (PX), or neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy in anticipation of future resection. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine if there is a difference in the perioperative outcomes and survival patterns between patients who undergo MP PD and those who undergo PB for locally advanced disease in the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. METHODS: We reviewed our pancreatic surgery database (January 2005-December 2007) to identify all patients who underwent exploration with curative intent of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma of the head/neck/uncinate process of the pancreas. Four groups of patients were identified, R0 PD, MP PD, PB, and PX. RESULTS: We identified 126 patients who underwent PD, PB, or PX. Fifty-six patients underwent R0 PD, 37 patients underwent MP PD, 24 patients underwent a PB procedure, and nine patients underwent PX. In the PB group, 58% underwent gastrojejunostomy (GJ) plus hepaticojejunostomy (HJ), 38% underwent GJ alone, and 4% underwent HJ alone. Of these PB patients, 25% had locally advanced disease and 75% had metastatic disease. All nine patients in the PX group had metastatic disease. The mean age, gender distribution, and preoperative comorbidities were similar between the groups. For the MP PD group, the distribution of positive margins on permanent section was 57% retroperitoneal soft tissue, 19% with more than one positive margin, 11% pancreatic neck, and 8% bile duct. The perioperative complication rates for the respective groups were R0 36%, MP 49%, PB 33%, and PX 22%. The 30-day perioperative mortality rate for the entire cohort was 2%, with all three of these deaths being in the R0 group. The median follow-up for the entire cohort was 14.4 months. Median survival for the respective groups was R0 27.2 months, MP 15.6 months, PB 6.5 months, and PX 5.4 months. CONCLUSIONS: Margin positive pancreaticoduodenectomy in highly selected patients can be performed safely, with low perioperative morbidity and mortality. Further investigation to determine the role of adjuvant treatment and longer-term follow-up are required to assess the durability of survival outcomes for patients undergoing MP PD resection.