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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jin-Ping Lai
Based on 7 articles published since 2010
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jinping Lai wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas: A Rare Entity With Unique Features. 2017

Dinarvand, Peyman / Lai, Jinping. ·From the Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Saint Louis University, Saint Louis, Missouri. ·Arch Pathol Lab Med · Pubmed #28661210.

ABSTRACT: Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas is a rare entity with low malignant potential and excellent overall prognosis. It has nonspecific clinical presentations such as abdominal pain and nausea, with vague radiologic features. Histologic features of this neoplasm are usually specific. The tumor shows minimally cohesive, uniform, monotonous cells lining delicate capillary-sized blood vessels, described as pseudopapillary architecture. Other features including hyaline globules, cytoplasmic vacuoles, and nuclear grooving are frequently present. Use of a select panel of immunostains always helps pathologists to differentiate this tumor from other circumscribed tumors of the pancreas. Recently, β-catenin, CD10, and E-cadherin have been shown to be very important in the diagnosis of solid pseudopapillary neoplasm. Nuclear staining of tumor cells by β-catenin and membranous presentation of CD10 is seen in almost 100% of cases. Tumor cells can be partially positive for synaptophysin and chromogranin. This tumor has a low malignant potential, and definite treatment is surgical resection.

2 Article Hepatic Collision Tumor of Metastatic Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia: A Case Report. 2018

Al-Taee, Ahmad / Lai, Jinping / Chen, Yongxin / Zhou, Yihua / Jallad, Bassel. ·Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO, USA. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University Cancer Center, 3655 Vista Avenue, St Louis, MO, 63110, USA. jalladbm@slu.edu. ·J Gastrointest Cancer · Pubmed #27868155.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Article Pancreatic Mucinous Cystic Neoplasm Communicating with Main Pancreatic Duct: An Unrecognized Presentation of Pancreatic Mucinous Neoplasm? 2017

Zhou, Weixun / Saam, Trustin / Zhou, Yihua / Trevino, Jose / Liu, Xiuli / Cao, Dengfeng / Lai, Jinping. ·Department of Pathology, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, P.R. China. · Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. · Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Surgery, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, Washington University in Saint Louis, St. Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology, Immunology, and Laboratory Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL, U.S.A. jinpinglai@ufl.edu. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #29187489.

ABSTRACT: Mucinous cystic neoplasms (MCNs) and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are two well recognized entities of precursor cystic lesions of pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma. The characteristic features of MCNs are the lined mucinous epithelium with underlying ovarian-type stroma, but without communication with the ducts, while that for IPMNs are the communication with the ducts but without the underlying ovarian-type stroma. Here we report a case of MCN communicating with the main pancreatic duct in a 68-year-old woman. The initial radiographic diagnosis was pancreatic IPMN with main pancreatic involvement and this was also confirmed during gross examination. Histologically, the pancreatic cystic neoplasm was lined with mucinous epithelium with underlying ovarian-type of stroma. Immunohistochemical stains confirmed that the stroma cells were positive for ER, PR, alpha-inhibin and focally positive for CD10. The final pathologic diagnosis was pancreatic mucinous cystic neoplasm communicating with the main pancreatic duct. To the best of our knowledge, this is the second pathology confirmed case of MCN communicating with the main pancreatic duct. A careful gross examination and bivalvation of the main duct communicating with the cystic neoplasm helps render the correct diagnosis. If more cases are reported in the future, the MCN communicating with duct could become a new entity of pancreatic mucinous neoplasm.

4 Article Comparison of endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration and PET/CT in preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2017

Lai, Jin-Ping / Yue, Yong / Zhang, Wei / Zhou, Yihua / Frishberg, David / Jamil, Laith H / Mirocha, James M / Guindi, Maha / Balzer, Bonnie / Bose, Shikha / Cao, Dengfeng / Lo, Simon / Fan, Xuemo / Rutgers, Joanne K. ·Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA; Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA. Electronic address: jinpinglai@ufl.edu. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA. · Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Digestive Disease Center, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. · Biostatistics Core, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. · Department of Pathology, Immunology and Laboratory Medicine, Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90048, USA. Electronic address: RutgersJK@cshs.org. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #28501471.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Endoscopic ultrasound guided fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) is the procedure of choice to investigate and sample pancreatic masses for the preoperative diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The role of METHODS: Preoperative evaluation by PET/CT and EUS-FNA was performed on 25 patients with pancreatic solid lesions, who underwent a subsequent Whipple procedure or partial pancreatic resection. RESULTS: This series included 19 PDACs and 6 non-PDACs including 1 metastatic breast ductal adenocarcinoma, 2 low grade neuroendocrine tumors, 2 chronic pancreatitis and 1 gastrointestinal tumor abutting the pancreas. EUS-FNA correctly diagnosed 18 of 19 PDACs, 1 metastatic breast ductal adenocarcinoma and all 5 of the other non-PDAC cases. One case of well differentiated PDAC was negative on EUS-FNA. PET/CT provided excellent size and was positive in 14 of 19 PDACs and the metastatic breast ductal adenocarcinoma. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and accuracy for EUS-FNA in diagnosis of selected pancreatic tumors were 91%, 100%, 100%, 50% and 92%, respectively, while they were 65%, 100%, 100%, 20% and 68% for PET/CT, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Compared to PET/CT, EUS-FNA has a higher sensitivity and accuracy for preoperative diagnosis of PDAC. However, PET/CT provides excellent size, volume and stage information. A combination of both PET/CT and EUS will better help guide diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

5 Article Adipose Triglyceride Lipase (ATGL) Expression Is Associated with Adiposity and Tumor Stromal Proliferation in Patients with Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2017

Grace, Shane A / Meeks, Marshall W / Chen, Yongxin / Cornwell, Mona / Ding, Xianzhong / Hou, Ping / Rutgers, Joanne K / Crawford, Susan E / Lai, Jin-Ping. ·Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, U.S.A. · Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, U.S.A. jinpinglai@slu.edu. ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #28179319.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Obesity is an established risk factor for the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). However, the pathophysiology of how increased adiposity increases the risk for PDAC has not been fully elucidated. Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is a lipase that catabolizes triglyceride hydrolysis and has been implicated in the development of breast cancer. We hypothesized that overweight patients with PDAC would demonstrate higher tumor ATGL expression compared to non-overweight patients with PDAC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Immunohistochemical analysis for ATGL expression was performed on PDAC tissues from 44 patients after Whipple procedure or distal pancreatectomy. Correlation of ATGL expression with clinicopathological features was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 23/44 (52.2%) PDACs showed low level ATGL immunoreactivity, while 21/44 (47.8%) showed a high level, with moderate to strong positive ATGL immunoreactivity in more than 50% of the tumor cells. Chi-squared testing revealed a statistically significant association between high ATGL expression and both BMI >25 kg/m CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that increased ATGL expression is associated with increased adiposity and stromal proliferation in patients with PDAC, making it a possible key protein in how obesity increases the risk of PDAC.

6 Article Primary Angiosarcoma of the Pancreas. 2017

Meeks, Marshall / Grace, Shane / Veerapong, Jula / Chen, Yongxin / Cao, Dengfeng / Zhou, Yihua / Lai, Jin-Ping. ·Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, 1402 S. Grand Blvd, St Louis, MO, 63104, USA. · Department of Surgery, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, 1402 S. Grand Blvd, St Louis, MO, 63104, USA. jinpinglai@slu.edu. ·J Gastrointest Cancer · Pubmed #27228987.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article Comparison of PAX6 and PAX8 as immunohistochemical markers for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2015

Lai, Jin-Ping / Mertens, Richard B / Mirocha, James / Koo, Jamie / Venturina, Mariza / Chung, Fai / Mendez, Allen B / Kahn, Melissa / Dhall, Deepti. ·Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 8700 Beverly Blvd, Los Angeles, CA, 90048, USA, jinpinglai@slu.edu. ·Endocr Pathol · Pubmed #25433656.

ABSTRACT: To compare the utility of PAX6 and PAX8 as immunohistochemical markers for neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of pancreatic origin, we performed PAX6 and PAX8 immunostains on 178 NETs, including 110 primary NETs (26 pancreatic, 10 gastric, 12 duodenal, 22 jejuno-ileal, 10 rectal, 30 pulmonary) and 68 NETs metastatic to the liver (24 pancreatic, 1 duodenal, 37 jejuno-ileal, 1 rectal, 5 pulmonary). Among primary NETs, PAX6 and PAX8 were positive in 65 % (17/26) and 73 % (19/26) of pancreatic, 0 % (0/10) and 10 % (1/10) of gastric, 92 % (11/12) and 92 % (11/12) of duodenal, 0 % (0/22) and 0 % (0/22) of jejuno-ileal, 90 % (9/10) and 80 % (8/10) of rectal, and 0 % (0/30) and 23 % (7/30) of pulmonary NETs, respectively. PAX6 and PAX8 positivity was seen in 46 % (11/24) and 50 % (12/24) of metastatic pancreatic NETs to the liver, respectively. None of the nonpancreatic NETs metastatic to the liver were immunoreactive for either PAX6 or PAX8. PAX6 showed a slightly but statistically significant higher specificity for pancreatic NETs than did PAX8 (P = 0.039), while the sensitivities were similar (P = 0.51). PAX6 had the additional advantages over PAX8 of not exhibiting nonspecific cytoplasmic staining of tumor cells and only infrequently staining background lymphocytes. Since rectal NETs rarely present with metastatic disease, positive staining of a metastatic NET of unknown primary origin for PAX6 and/or PAX8 favors a pancreatic or duodenal origin. This information may be helpful in directing further diagnostic studies to identify the primary site of the metastatic tumor.