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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Morten Ladekarl
Based on 13 articles published since 2010
(Why 13 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, M. Ladekarl wrote the following 13 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Nordic guidelines 2014 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Sorbye, Halfdan / Welin, Staffan / Federspiel, Birgitte / Grønbæk, Henning / Hellman, Per / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Mortensen, Jann / Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla / Sundin, Anders / Sundlöv, Anna / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Knigge, Ulrich. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden * ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #25140861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has undergone major recent advances and new methods are currently introduced into the clinic. An update of the WHO classification has resulted in a new nomenclature dividing NENs into neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤ 2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumours and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index > 20%, G3. Aim. These Nordic guidelines summarise the Nordic Neuroendocrine Tumour Group's current view on how to diagnose and treat NEN-patients and are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling these patients.

2 Review Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database. 2016

Fristrup, Claus / Detlefsen, Sönke / Hansen, Carsten Palnæs / Ladekarl, Morten. ·Department of Surgical Gastroenterology. · Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Odense. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. · Department of Oncology; Department of Gastroenterological Surgery L, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark. ·Clin Epidemiol · Pubmed #27822112.

ABSTRACT: AIM OF DATABASE: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database aims to prospectively register the epidemiology, diagnostic workup, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer in Denmark at an institutional and national level. STUDY POPULATION: Since May 1, 2011, all patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas have been registered in the database. As of June 30, 2014, the total number of patients registered was 2,217. All data are cross-referenced with the Danish Pathology Registry and the Danish Patient Registry to ensure the completeness of registrations. MAIN VARIABLES: The main registered variables are patient demographics, performance status, diagnostic workup, histological and/or cytological diagnosis, and clinical tumor stage. The following data on treatment are registered: type of operation, date of first adjuvant, neoadjuvant, and first palliative chemo- or chemoradiation therapy, and dates for milestones in referrals, diagnostic workup, treatment decisions, and treatment. For patients undergoing resection, data on operative evaluation of tumor stage, histological diagnosis, and duration of hospital stay are registered. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: Death is monitored using data from the Danish Civil Registry. This registry monitors the survival status of the Danish population, and the registration is virtually complete. All data in the database are audited by all participating institutions, with respect to baseline characteristics, key indicators, and survival. The results are published annually. CONCLUSION: The Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database has registered data on 2,217 patients with microscopically verified ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. The data have been obtained nationwide over a period of 4 years and 2 months. The completeness of registration was 82%. The observed overall 3-year survival after diagnosis was 6%.

3 Article Initial treatment and survival in 4163 Danish patients with pancreatic cancer: A nationwide unselected real-world register study. 2020

Rasmussen, Louise S / Fristrup, Claus W / Jensen, Benny V / Pfeiffer, Per / Weber, Britta / Yilmaz, Mette K / Poulsen, Laurids Ø / Ladekarl, Morten / Østerlind, Kell / Larsen, Jim S / Skuladottir, Hella / Hansen, Carsten P / Mortensen, Michael B / Mortensen, Frank V / Sall, Mogens / Detlefsen, Sönke / Bøgsted, Martin / Falkmer, Ursula G. ·Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. Electronic address: loskr@rn.dk. · Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database, Denmark; Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, North Zealand Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Zealand University Hospital, Næstved and Roskilde, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Herning Hospital, Herning, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Department of Pathology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Aalborg University, Aalborg, Denmark; Department of Haematology, Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #32120275.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nationwide register data on the effect of primary treatment on survival in an unselected population of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) have not been reported before. The study aim was to investigate the overall survival (OS) related to initial treatment with resection, chemotherapy, or best supportive care (BSC) in all patients diagnosed with PC in Denmark from 2011 to 2016. METHODS: From 1 May 2011 to 30 April 2016, 4260 patients with PC were identified in the Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database. Ninety-seven patients (2%) were excluded, 56 because of treatment with preoperative chemotherapy, 39 because of incorrect registration of diagnosis or treatment, and 2 because of loss to follow-up; thus, 4163 patients were included. RESULTS: The 718 patients (17%) receiving resection had a median overall survival (mOS) of 21.9 months (range 20.0-24.2). In the chemotherapy group of 1746 patients (42%), those treated with FOLFIRINOX had the longest mOS of 10.0 months (9.2-11.0), whereas those treated with gemcitabine had the shortest mOS of 5.1 months (4.8-5.6). The 1697 patients (41%) receiving BSC had a mOS of only 1.6 months (1.5-1.7). CONCLUSIONS: The resected PC cohort had an OS comparable with that reported in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). The mOS of the chemotherapy-treated patients was slightly shorter compared with the results from RCTs and reflects the unselected population in this study. During the last decade, a larger fraction of patients received anticancer treatment, but the BSC group was still large and showed extremely poor OS.

4 Article Acute pancreatitis as an early marker of pancreatic cancer and cancer stage, treatment, and prognosis. 2020

Kirkegård, Jakob / Gaber, Charles / Lund, Jennifer L / Hinton, Sharon P / Ladekarl, Morten / Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe / Cronin-Fenton, Deirdre / Mortensen, Frank V. ·Department of Surgery, Section for Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA. Electronic address: jakob.kirkegaard@auh.rm.dk. · Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark; Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC, USA. · Department of Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Section for Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. ·Cancer Epidemiol · Pubmed #31811984.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We aimed to examine the association between acute pancreatitis, a potential early symptom of pancreatic cancer, and pancreatic cancer stage, treatment, and prognosis. METHODS: We conducted a cohort study of patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer during 2004-2017 using population-based registry data from Denmark and Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) data linked with Medicare claims from the United States (US), which include individuals aged 65 + . We ascertained information on acute pancreatitis diagnoses up to 90 days before pancreatic cancer and followed them for a maximum of five years. We assessed overall survival difference at 30 days, six months, and one, three and five years, comparing patients with and without coexistence of acute pancreatitis. Secondary outcomes were cancer stage and treatment. RESULTS: We identified 12,522 Danish and 37,552 US patients with pancreatic cancer (median age 71 and 78 years, respectively). In the Danish cohort, 1.4 % had acute pancreatitis before pancreatic cancer vs. 5.9 % in the US cohort. After five years of follow-up, the survival difference was 6.1 % (95 % CI: [-0.4 %, 12.6 %]) in Danish and 1.7 % (95 % CI: [0.8 %, 2.7 %]) in US patients, comparing patients with and without acute pancreatitis. Patients with acute pancreatitis had lower prevalence of metastatic tumors at diagnosis (Denmark: 42.5 % vs. 48.7 %; US: 34.4 % vs. 45.9 %) and higher resection frequencies (Denmark: 20.1 % vs. 12.1 %; US: 16.1 % vs.11.3 %) than patients without acute pancreatitis. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic cancer patients with acute pancreatitis diagnosed up to 90 days before cancer diagnosis had earlier stage at diagnosis and better survival than patients without acute pancreatitis.

5 Article The effect of postoperative gemcitabine on overall survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer: A nationwide population-based Danish register study. 2019

Skau Rasmussen, Louise / Vittrup, Benny / Ladekarl, Morten / Pfeiffer, Per / Karen Yilmaz, Mette / Østergaard Poulsen, Laurids / Østerlind, Kell / Palnæs Hansen, Carsten / Bau Mortensen, Michael / Viborg Mortensen, Frank / Sall, Mogens / Detlefsen, Sönke / Bøgsted, Martin / Wilki Fristrup, Claus. ·a Department of Oncology , Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital , Aalborg , Denmark. · b Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine , Aalborg University , Aalborg , Denmark. · c Department of Oncology , University Hospital Herlev , Herlev , Denmark. · d Department of Oncology , Aarhus University Hospital , Aarhus , Denmark. · e Department of Oncology , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark. · f Department of Oncology , North Sealand Hospital , Hillerød , Denmark. · g Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Rigshospitalet , Copenhagen University Hospital , Copenhagen , Denmark. · h Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Department of Surgery , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark. · i Department of Surgical Gastroenterology , Aarhus University Hospital , Aarhus , Denmark. · j Department of Surgical Gastroenterology , Aalborg University Hospital , Aalborg , Denmark. · k Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Department of Pathology , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark. · l Department of Haematology , Clinical Cancer Research Center, Aalborg University Hospital , Aalborg , Denmark. · m Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database , Denmark. · n Department of Surgery , Odense University Hospital , Odense , Denmark. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #30905248.

ABSTRACT:

6 Article Urban versus rural residency and pancreatic cancer survival: A Danish nationwide population-based cohort study. 2018

Kirkegård, Jakob / Ladekarl, Morten / Fristrup, Claus Wilki / Hansen, Carsten Palnæs / Sall, Mogens / Mortensen, Frank Viborg. ·Department of Surgery, HPB section, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Odense Pancreas Center (OPAC), Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Transplantation, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Aalborg University Hospital, Aaborg, Denmark. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #30114213.

ABSTRACT: It is unknown whether urban versus rural residency affects pancreatic cancer survival in a universal tax-financed healthcare system. We conducted a nationwide, population-based cohort study of all patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in Denmark from 2004-2015. We used nationwide registries to collect information on characteristics, comorbidity, cancer-directed treatment, and vital status. We followed the patients from pancreatic cancer diagnosis until death, emigration, or 1 October 2017, whichever occurred first. We truncated at five years of follow up. We stratified patients into calendar periods according to year of diagnosis (2004-2007, 2008-2011, and 2012-2015). We used Cox proportional hazards model to compute hazard ratios (HRs) with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of death, comparing patients in urban and rural areas. HRs were adjusted for age, sex, comorbidity, tumor stage, and localization. In a sub-analysis, we also adjusted for cancer-directed treatment. We included 10,594 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Median age was 71 years (inter-quartile range: 63-78 years), and half were men. The majority (61.7%) lived in an urban area at the time of diagnosis. When adjusting for potential confounders, we observed a better survival rate among pancreatic cancer patients residing in urban areas compared with rural areas (adjusted HR: 0.92; 95% CI: 0.87-0.98). When taking treatment into account, the association was unclear (adjusted HR: 0.96; 95% CI: 0.88-1.04). Pancreatic cancer patients residing in urban areas had a slightly better survival rate compared with patients in rural areas.

7 Article Intravenous versus oral etoposide: efficacy and correlation to clinical outcome in patients with high-grade metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (WHO G3). 2018

Ali, Abir Salwa / Grönberg, Malin / Langer, Seppo W / Ladekarl, Morten / Hjortland, Geir Olav / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Österlund, Pia / Welin, Staffan / Grønbæk, Henning / Knigge, Ulrich / Sorbye, Halfdan / Janson, Eva Tiensuu. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. abir.ali@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital and Tampere University, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland. · Departments of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Med Oncol · Pubmed #29511910.

ABSTRACT: High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS and OS were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier (log-rank), cox proportional hazard ratios and confidence intervals. No statistical differences were observed in PFS or OS when comparing patients receiving long infusion (median PFS 3.8 months, median OS 14.5 months), short infusion (PFS 5.6 months, OS 11.0 months) or oral etoposide (PFS 5.4 months, OS 11.3 months). We observed equal efficacy for the three administration routes suggesting oral etoposide may be safe and efficient in treating high-grade GEP-NEN, G3 patients scheduled for cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide therapy.

8 Article Expression of p53 protein in high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. 2017

Ali, Abir Salwa / Grönberg, Malin / Federspiel, Birgitte / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Hjortland, Geir Olav / Grønbæk, Henning / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Welin, Staffan / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Arola, Johanna / Österlund, Pia / Knigge, Ulrich / Sorbye, Halfdan / Grimelius, Lars / Janson, Eva Tiensuu. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biopathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepatology & Gastroenterology, Aarhus university Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Pathology, HUSLAB, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Helsinki Finland. · Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital and Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29112960.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NECs) are aggressive, rapidly proliferating tumors. Therapeutic response to current chemotherapy regimens is usually short lasting. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and potential clinical importance of immunoreactive p53 protein in GEP-NEC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tumor tissues from 124 GEP-NEC patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were collected from Nordic centers and clinical data were obtained from the Nordic NEC register. Tumor proliferation rate and differentiation were re-evaluated. All specimens were immunostained for p53 protein using a commercially available monoclonal antibody. Kaplan-Meier curves and cox regression analyses were used to assess progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: All tumor tissues were immunoreactive for either one or both neuroendocrine biomarkers (chromogranin A and synaptophysin) and Ki67 index was >20% in all cases. p53 immunoreactivity was only shown in 39% of the cases and was not found to be a prognostic marker for the whole cohort. However, p53 immunoreactivity was correlated with shorter PFS in patients with colorectal tumors (HR = 2.1, p = 0.03) in a univariate analysis as well as to poorer PFS (HR = 2.6, p = 0.03) and OS (HR = 3.4, p = 0.02) in patients with colorectal tumors with distant metastases, a correlation which remained significant in the multivariate analyses. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of GEP-NEC patients, p53 expression could not be correlated with clinical outcome. However, in patients with colorectal NECs, p53 expression was correlated with shorter PFS and OS. Further studies are needed to establish the role of immunoreactive p53 as a prognostic marker for GEP-NEC patients.

9 Article Results after surgical treatment of liver metastases in patients with high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas. 2017

Galleberg, R B / Knigge, U / Tiensuu Janson, E / Vestermark, L W / Haugvik, S-P / Ladekarl, M / Langer, S W / Grønbæk, H / Österlund, P / Hjortland, G O / Assmus, J / Tang, L / Perren, A / Sorbye, H. ·Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: renate.berget.galleberg@helse-bergen.no. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: rxs484@ku.dk. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. Electronic address: eva.tiensuu_janson@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: lene.vestermark@syd.dk. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: mortlade@rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: swlanger@dadlnet.dk. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: henning.gronbaek@aarhus.rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: pia.osterlund@pshp.fi. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: goo@ous-hf.no. · Center for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: jorg.assmus@helse-bergen.no. · Department of Pathology, MSKCC, New York, USA. Electronic address: tangl@MSKCC.ORG. · Department of Pathology, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: aurel.perren@pathology.unibe.ch. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Halfdan.sorbye@helse-bergen.no. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28522174.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NEC) are generally characterized by synchronous metastases, high aggressiveness and a dismal prognosis. Current international guidelines do not recommend surgical treatment of liver metastases, however the existing data are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of curatively intended resection/radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases in patients with metastatic GEP-NEC. METHODS: 32 patients with a diagnosis of high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (Ki-67 > 20%) and with intended curative resection/RFA of liver metastases, were identified among 840 patients from two Nordic GEP-NEC registries. Tumor morphology (well vs poor differentiation) was reassessed. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analyses for the entire cohort and for subgroups. RESULTS: Median OS after resection/RFA of liver metastases was 35.9 months (95%-CI: 20.6-51.3) with a five-year OS of 43%. The median PFS was 8.4 months (95%-CI: 3.9-13). Four patients (13%) were disease-free after 5 years. Two patients had well-differentiated morphology (NET G3) and 20 patients (63%) had Ki-67 ≥ 55%. A Ki-67 < 55% and receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were statistically significant factors of improved OS after liver resection/RFA. CONCLUSION: This study shows a long median and long term survival after liver surgery/RFA for these selected metastatic GEP-NEC patients, particularly for the group with a Ki-67 in the relatively lower G3 range. Our findings indicate a possible role for surgical treatment of liver metastases in the management of this patient population.

10 Article Danish experiences with FOLFIRINOX as first-line therapy in patients with inoperable pancreatic cancer. 2014

Kræmer, Pia Charlotte / Schmidt, Hjørdis Hjalting / Ladekarl, Morten. ·Onkologisk Afdeling D, Aarhus Universitetshospital, Nørrebrogade 44, 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark. piacka@dadlnet.dk. ·Dan Med J · Pubmed #24814594.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Worldwide, pancreatic cancer (PC) ranks 13th in cancer incidence, but eighth as a cause of cancer death. For more than a decade, the reference regimen for palliative treatment of PC has been gemcitabine. In 2011, a randomised trial published by the PRODRIGE Intergroup showed an increase in median overall survival from 6.8 to 11.1 months in patients treated with FOLFIRINOX as compared with gemcitabine. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 16 patients treated with FOLFIRINOX as first-line therapy for inoperable PC were included for this retrospective study. FOLFIRINOX was administered unmodified according to the PRODRIGE trial, and up to 12 cycles were planned with a computed tomography (CT) for every fourth cycle. RESULTS: Eleven patients completing at least four cycles of chemotherapy and therefore evaluable for response were assessed by review of CT. Partial response (PR) was shown after four cycles in four patients, whereas seven patients had stable disease, which resulted in an objective response rate of 36%. After eight cycles, one additional patient obtained a PR. No complete responders or patients with progressive disease were recorded. Toxicity was assessed by review of medical records with respect to toxic effects requiring interruption of therapy, admission of the patient or prolonged admission. CONCLUSION: Toxicity was shown to be a problem only during the first five cycles, and no patients were admitted to hospital due to toxicity after having received more than five cycles. The six-month-survival was 81%. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant.

11 Article [Danish Pancreatic Cancer Database]. 2012

Fristrup, Claus / Palnæs Hansen, Carsten / Ladekarl, Morten / Mortensen, Michael Bau. ·Skovalleen 31, Odense. claus@fristrup.net ·Ugeskr Laeger · Pubmed #23079448.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

12 Article [Oncological treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer]. 2010

Ladekarl, Morten / Jensen, Benny Vittrup / Pfeiffer, Per. ·Onkologisk Afdeling D, Arhus Sygehus, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark. mortlade@rm.dk ·Ugeskr Laeger · Pubmed #20444408.

ABSTRACT: Only radical resection can cure patients with pancreatic cancer (PC); however, adjuvant gemcitabine (GEM) doubles the postoperative five-year-survival. The best treatment of locally advanced PC is not established, but radio-chemotherapy followed by surgery may be considered. Fit patients with metastatic PC benefit from GEM, which is standard. The addition of the epidermal growth factor-receptor-inhibitor erlotinib prolongs median survival significantly by two weeks and one-year survival by 7%. Very fit patients might benefit by combining GEM with platinum or capecitabine, but evidence is not firm. Participation in clinical trials is strongly encouraged in PC.

13 Minor BRCA-associated pancreatico-biliary neoplasms: Four cases illustrating the emerging clinical impact of genotyping. 2016

Sharma, Maja Bendtsen / Carus, Andreas / Sunde, Lone / Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen / Ladekarl, Morten. ·a Department of Oncology , Aarhus University Hospital , Denmark. · b Department of Clinical Genetics , Aarhus University Hospital , Denmark. · c Institute of Pathology, Aarhus University Hospital , Denmark. ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #26004055.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --