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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Robert C. Kurtz
Based on 37 articles published since 2009
(Why 37 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, R. C. Kurtz wrote the following 37 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2
1 Review Epidemiology of pancreatic cancer and the role of family history. 2013

Olson, Sara H / Kurtz, Robert C. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. olsons@mskcc.org ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22589078.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a lethal disease for which only a small number of risk factors have been identified. In addition to older age, male gender, and black race, risk factors include smoking, obesity, long-standing diabetes and pancreatitis, and heavy alcohol use; allergies such as hay fever are related to lowered risk. Several genetic syndromes increase risk of pancreatic cancer. Work on more common genetic variants promises to reveal more potentially important genetic associations.

2 Clinical Trial A single-arm, nonrandomized phase II trial of neoadjuvant gemcitabine and oxaliplatin in patients with resectable pancreas adenocarcinoma. 2014

OʼReilly, Eileen M / Perelshteyn, Anna / Jarnagin, William R / Schattner, Mark / Gerdes, Hans / Capanu, Marinela / Tang, Laura H / LaValle, Joseph / Winston, Corinne / DeMatteo, Ronald P / DʼAngelica, Michael / Kurtz, Robert C / Abou-Alfa, Ghassan K / Klimstra, David S / Lowery, Maeve A / Brennan, Murray F / Coit, Daniel G / Reidy, Diane L / Kingham, T Peter / Allen, Peter J. ·*Gastrointestinal Oncology Service †Department of Medicine ‡Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery Service §Gastroenterology and Nutrition Service Departments of ¶Epidemiology and Biostatistics ‖Pathology **Radiology ††Surgery; and ‡‡Gastric and Mixed Tumor Service, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #24901360.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role for neoadjuvant systemic therapy in resectable pancreas adenocarcinoma remains undefined. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the efficacy of gemcitabine and oxaliplatin administered as preoperative therapy in patients with resectable pancreas adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Eligible patients were screened using computed tomography-pancreas angiography, laparoscopy, endoscopic ultrasonography, and fine-needle aspiration cytology to identify 38 patients who received 4 cycles of neoadjuvant gemcitabine 1000 mg/m intravenously over 100 minutes and oxaliplatin 80 mg/m intravenously over 2 hours, every 2 weeks. Patients whose tumors remained resectable at restaging proceeded to operation and subsequently received 5 cycles of adjuvant gemcitabine (1000 mg/m intravenously over 30 minutes days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks). The primary endpoint was 18-month overall survival and secondary endpoints included radiological, tumor marker and pathological response to neoadjuvant therapy, time to recurrence, patterns of failure, and feasibility of obtaining preoperative core biopsies. RESULTS: Thirty-five of 38 patients (92%) completed neoadjuvant therapy. Twenty-seven patients underwent tumor resection (resectability rate 71%), of which 26 initiated adjuvant therapy for a total of 23 patients (60.5%) who completed all planned therapy. The 18-month survival was 63% (24 patients alive). The median overall survival for all 38 patients was 27.2 months (95% confidence interval: 17-NA) and the median disease-specific survival was 30.6 months (95% confidence interval: 19-NA). CONCLUSIONS: This study met its endpoint and provided a signal suggesting that exploration of neoadjuvant systemic therapy is worthy of further investigation in resectable pancreas adenocarcinoma. Improved patient selection and more active systemic regimens are key. Clinical trials identification: NCT00536874.

3 Article The Association of Recently Diagnosed Diabetes and Long-term Diabetes With Survival in Pancreatic Cancer Patients: A Pooled Analysis. 2018

Jeon, Christie Y / Li, Donghui / Cleary, Sean / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Bosetti, Cristina / La Vecchia, Carlo / Porta, Miquel / Toriola, Adetunji T / Hung, Rayjean J / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29401167.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: It is unclear whether long-standing diabetes or new-onset pancreatogenic diabetes contributes to poor prognosis in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: We investigated the influence of diabetes diagnosed shortly before PDAC and long-term diabetes on overall survival in 2792 PDAC patients who had participated in 3 PDAC case-control studies in the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. There were 300 patients with long-term diabetes of more than 3 years' duration (11%) and 418 patients with recently diagnosed diabetes of 3-year duration or less (15%). We performed Cox regression to determine the association of long-term diabetes and recently diagnosed diabetes with overall survival, adjusting for study site, age, sex, race, stage of disease, surgery, chemotherapy, smoking history, and body mass index at diagnosis. RESULTS: In the overall population, neither long-term diabetes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97-1.26) nor recently diagnosed diabetes (HR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.94-1.18) was associated with shorter survival. When stratified by stage of disease, long-term diabetes was associated with 42% increase in rate of death in persons with resectable PDAC (HR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.13-1.78), whereas it was not associated with survival in PDAC patients with more advanced disease. CONCLUSION: Long-term diabetes was associated with increased rate of death in patients with resectable PDAC.

4 Article Characterising 2018

Zhang, Mingfeng / Lykke-Andersen, Soren / Zhu, Bin / Xiao, Wenming / Hoskins, Jason W / Zhang, Xijun / Rost, Lauren M / Collins, Irene / Bunt, Martijn van de / Jia, Jinping / Parikh, Hemang / Zhang, Tongwu / Song, Lei / Jermusyk, Ashley / Chung, Charles C / Zhu, Bin / Zhou, Weiyin / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Yeager, Meredith / Jensen, Torben Heick / Brown, Kevin M / Ongen, Halit / Bamlet, William R / Murray, Bradley A / McCarthy, Mark I / Chanock, Stephen J / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Wolpin, Brian M / Smith, Jill P / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Shi, Jianxin / Amundadottir, Laufey. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, Missouri, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. · Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University Cambridge, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #28634199.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the genetic architecture of gene expression in pancreatic tissues. DESIGN: We performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in histologically normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=95) using RNA sequencing and the corresponding 1000 genomes imputed germline genotypes. Data from pancreatic tumour-derived tissue samples (n=115) from The Cancer Genome Atlas were included for comparison. RESULTS: We identified 38 615 CONCLUSIONS: We have identified

5 Article The oral microbiota in patients with pancreatic cancer, patients with IPMNs, and controls: a pilot study. 2017

Olson, Sara H / Satagopan, Jaya / Xu, Youming / Ling, Lilan / Leong, Siok / Orlow, Irene / Saldia, Amethyst / Li, Peter / Nunes, Pamela / Madonia, Vincent / Allen, Peter J / O'Reilly, Eileen / Pamer, Eric / Kurtz, Robert C. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY, 10021, USA. olsons@mskcc.org. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 485 Lexington Avenue, New York, NY, 10021, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, NY, 10461, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 417 East 68 Street, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1250 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · New York University School of Medicine, 550 First Avenue, New York, NY, 10016, USA. · Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 300 East 66 Street, New York, NY, 10065, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY, 10065, USA. ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #28762074.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Poor oral health appears to be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, possibly implicating the oral microbiota. In this pilot study, we evaluated the characteristics of the oral microbiota in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN), and healthy controls. METHODS: Forty newly diagnosed PDAC patients, 39 IPMN patients, and 58 controls, excluding current smokers and users of antibiotics, provided saliva samples. Common oral bacterial species were comprehensively surveyed by sequencing of the 16S rRNA microbial genes. We obtained measures of diversity and the mean relative proportions of individual taxa. We explored the degree to which these measures differed according to respondent characteristics based on individual interviews. RESULTS: PDAC cases did not differ in diversity measures from either controls or IPMN cases. PDAC cases had higher mean relative proportions of Firmicutes and related taxa, while controls had higher mean relative proportions of Proteobacteria and related taxa. Results were generally similar when comparing PDAC to IPMN cases. Among IPMNs and controls combined, younger individuals had higher levels of several taxa within the Proteobacteria. The only other variable consistently related to mean relative proportions was mouthwash use, with taxa within Firmicutes more common among users. CONCLUSIONS: While there were no differences in diversity of the oral microbiota among these groups, there were differences in the mean relative proportions of some taxa. Characteristics of the oral microbiota are not associated with most measures of oral health.

6 Article Epidemiology of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2017

Simoes, Priya K / Olson, Sara H / Saldia, Amethyst / Kurtz, Robert C. ·Gastroenterology and Nutrition Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Gastroenterology and Nutrition Service, Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. kurtzr@mskcc.org. ·Chin Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28705001.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is one of the most lethal cancers worldwide. The highest incidence rates her found are in North America and in Western Europe while lower rates in Asian Africa, with age standard incidence rates of 7.2 and 2.8 per 100,000 populations. Unfortunately the vast majority of individuals with pancreatic cancer present with symptoms, and once symptoms develop the chance for surgery is only about 20%. Additionally he incidence rate and mortality from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in the United States shows a very close association suggesting that her earlier detection and treatment does little to change the outcome from this disease. Multiple of environmental and genetic risk factors have been implicated in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. We have reviewed those risk factors we believe are most important the development of this lethal disease. It is hoped that in the future, identification of biomarkers unique in the development of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma will be identified leading to earlier detection and a greater frequency of potential cure of this disease.

7 Article PanIN Neuroendocrine Cells Promote Tumorigenesis via Neuronal Cross-talk. 2017

Sinha, Smrita / Fu, Ya-Yuan / Grimont, Adrien / Ketcham, Maren / Lafaro, Kelly / Saglimbeni, Joseph A / Askan, Gokce / Bailey, Jennifer M / Melchor, Jerry P / Zhong, Yi / Joo, Min Geol / Grbovic-Huezo, Olivera / Yang, In-Hong / Basturk, Olca / Baker, Lindsey / Park, Young / Kurtz, Robert C / Tuveson, David / Leach, Steven D / Pasricha, Pankaj J. ·David M. Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Gastroenterology and Nutrition Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. · Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. · Gastrointestinal Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. · David M. Rubenstein Center for Pancreatic Cancer Research, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. leachs@mskcc.org ppasric1@jhmi.edu. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. leachs@mskcc.org ppasric1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #28386018.

ABSTRACT: Nerves are a notable feature of the tumor microenvironment in some epithelial tumors, but their role in the malignant progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is uncertain. Here, we identify dense innervation in the microenvironment of precancerous pancreatic lesions, known as pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanIN), and describe a unique subpopulation of neuroendocrine PanIN cells that express the neuropeptide substance P (SP) receptor neurokinin 1-R (NK1-R). Using organoid culture, we demonstrated that sensory neurons promoted the proliferation of PanIN organoids via SP-NK1-R signaling and STAT3 activation. Nerve-responsive neuroendocrine cells exerted trophic influences and potentiated global PanIN organoid growth. Sensory denervation of a genetically engineered mouse model of PDAC led to loss of STAT3 activation, a decrease in the neoplastic neuroendocrine cell population, and impaired PanIN progression to tumor. Overall, our data provide evidence that nerves of the PanIN microenvironment promote oncogenesis, likely via direct signaling to neoplastic neuroendocrine cells capable of trophic influences. These findings identify neuroepithelial cross-talk as a potential novel target in PDAC treatment.

8 Article Functional characterization of a chr13q22.1 pancreatic cancer risk locus reveals long-range interaction and allele-specific effects on DIS3 expression. 2016

Hoskins, Jason W / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Emmanuel, Mickey A / Manmiller, Sarah M / Wu, Yinglun / O'Neill, Maura / Jia, Jinping / Collins, Irene / Zhang, Mingfeng / Thomas, Janelle V / Rost, Lauren M / Das, Sudipto / Parikh, Hemang / Haake, Jefferson M / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Bamlet, William R / Klein, Alison / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolpin, Brian M / Yarden, Ronit / Wang, Zhaoming / Smith, Jill / Olson, Sara H / Andresson, Thorkell / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Protein Characterization Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Human Science, NHS, Georgetown University Medical Center, NW, Washington DC, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, and Department of Medicine, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey PA, USA. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #28172817.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. Here we report fine-mapping and functional analysis of one such locus residing in a 610 kb gene desert on chr13q22.1 (marked by rs9543325). The closest candidate genes, KLF5, KLF12, PIBF1, DIS3 and BORA, range in distance from 265-586 kb. Sequencing three sub-regions containing the top ranked SNPs by imputation P-value revealed a 30 bp insertion/deletion (indel) variant that was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk (rs386772267, P = 2.30 × 10

9 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

10 Article Menstrual and Reproductive Factors, Hormone Use, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Analysis From the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2016

Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Zhang, Wei / Olson, Sara H / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert / Baghurst, Peter A / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Foretová, Lenka / Gallinger, Steven / Holcatova, Ivana / Janout, Vladimír / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lagiou, Pagona / Li, Donghui / Miller, Anthony B / Serraino, Diego / Zatonski, Witold / Risch, Harvey A / Duell, Eric J. ·From the *Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; †Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute and Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; §Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; ∥Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; ¶University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; #National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven; **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; ††Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; ‡‡Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; §§Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic; ∥∥University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ¶¶Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague; ##Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; ***National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; †††Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; ‡‡‡Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; §§§Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece; ∥∥∥Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; ¶¶¶M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX; ###Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ****Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy; ††††Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland; and ‡‡‡‡Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27088489.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the relation between menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormones, and risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Eleven case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium took part in the present study, including in total 2838 case and 4748 control women. Pooled estimates of odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a 2-step logistic regression model and adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: An inverse OR was observed in women who reported having had hysterectomy (ORyesvs.no, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.91), remaining significant in postmenopausal women and never-smoking women, adjusted for potential PC confounders. A mutually adjusted model with the joint effect for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hysterectomy showed significant inverse associations with PC in women who reported having had hysterectomy with HRT use (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Our large pooled analysis suggests that women who have had a hysterectomy may have reduced risk of PC. However, we cannot rule out that the reduced risk could be due to factors or indications for having had a hysterectomy. Further investigation of risk according to HRT use and reason for hysterectomy may be necessary.

11 Article Weight Loss, Diabetes, Fatigue, and Depression Preceding Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Olson, Sara H / Xu, Youming / Herzog, Keri / Saldia, Amethyst / DeFilippis, Ersilia M / Li, Peter / Allen, Peter J / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Kurtz, Robert C. ·From the Departments of *Epidemiology and Biostatistics and †Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; ‡Weill Cornell Medical College; and §Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26692445.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to determine the severity and co-occurrence of established and potential paraneoplastic conditions in pancreatic cancer (weight loss, new onset diabetes, fatigue, and depression) and their relation to patient characteristics. METHODS: Using information from personal interviews with 510 cases and 463 controls, we obtained adjusted odds ratios for weight loss, long-term and new-onset diabetes, fatigue, and depression before diagnosis. Among cases, we investigated the extent to which these factors occurred together and the characteristics of those reporting them. RESULTS: The adjusted odds ratio for weight loss (>3% of usual weight) was 27.0 (95% confidence interval, 17.1-42.6). Severe weight loss was common (21% of cases lost >15%), and was more common in those previously obese. Diabetes was more common in cases and was strongly associated with weight loss (P < 0.0001). Diabetes in cases more often led to prescription of insulin, compared with controls.Fatigue and depression were significantly more common in cases than controls but not related to weight loss or diabetes. These conditions were not related to stage at diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Weight loss, often severe, and new-onset diabetes frequently occur together before diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. Fatigue and depression are also potential precursors of diagnosis.

12 Article Whole Genome Sequencing Defines the Genetic Heterogeneity of Familial Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Roberts, Nicholas J / Norris, Alexis L / Petersen, Gloria M / Bondy, Melissa L / Brand, Randall / Gallinger, Steven / Kurtz, Robert C / Olson, Sara H / Rustgi, Anil K / Schwartz, Ann G / Stoffel, Elena / Syngal, Sapna / Zogopoulos, George / Ali, Syed Z / Axilbund, Jennifer / Chaffee, Kari G / Chen, Yun-Ching / Cote, Michele L / Childs, Erica J / Douville, Christopher / Goes, Fernando S / Herman, Joseph M / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine / Kramer, Melissa / Makohon-Moore, Alvin / McCombie, Richard W / McMahon, K Wyatt / Niknafs, Noushin / Parla, Jennifer / Pirooznia, Mehdi / Potash, James B / Rhim, Andrew D / Smith, Alyssa L / Wang, Yuxuan / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Wood, Laura D / Zandi, Peter P / Goggins, Michael / Karchin, Rachel / Eshleman, James R / Papadopoulos, Nickolas / Kinzler, Kenneth W / Vogelstein, Bert / Hruban, Ralph H / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas. · Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. · Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan. · Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Population Sciences Division, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Gastroenterology Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Biomedical Engineering, Institute for Computational Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Stanley Institute for Cognitive Genomics, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York. inGenious Targeting Laboratory, Ronkonkoma, New York. · Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. · Division of Gastroenterology, Departments of Medicine and Genetics, Pancreatic Cancer Translational Center of Excellence, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Department of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. · Department of Surgery, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Medicine, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. · Ludwig Center and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Department of Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland. vogelbe@jhmi.edu nrobert8@jhmi.edu kinzlke@jhmi.edu rhruban@jhmi.edu aklein1@jhmi.edu. ·Cancer Discov · Pubmed #26658419.

ABSTRACT: SIGNIFICANCE: The genetic basis of disease susceptibility in the majority of patients with familial pancreatic cancer is unknown. We whole genome sequenced 638 patients with familial pancreatic cancer and demonstrate that the genetic underpinning of inherited pancreatic cancer is highly heterogeneous. This has significant implications for the management of patients with familial pancreatic cancer.

13 Article Identification of germline genetic mutations in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2015

Salo-Mullen, Erin E / O'Reilly, Eileen M / Kelsen, David P / Ashraf, Asad M / Lowery, Maeve A / Yu, Kenneth H / Reidy, Diane L / Epstein, Andrew S / Lincoln, Anne / Saldia, Amethyst / Jacobs, Lauren M / Rau-Murthy, Rohini / Zhang, Liying / Kurtz, Robert C / Saltz, Leonard / Offit, Kenneth / Robson, Mark E / Stadler, Zsofia K. ·Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York. ·Cancer · Pubmed #26440929.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) is part of several cancer predisposition syndromes; however, indications for genetic counseling/testing are not well-defined. In the current study, the authors sought to determine mutation prevalence and characteristics that are predictive of an inherited predisposition for PAC. METHODS: A total of 175 consecutive patients with PAC who underwent clinical genetics assessment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center between 2011 and 2014 were identified. Clinical data, family history, and germline results were evaluated. RESULTS: Among 159 patients with PAC who pursued genetic testing, 24 pathogenic mutations were identified (15.1%; 95% confidence interval, 9.5%-20.7%), including BRCA2 (13 mutations), BRCA1 (4 mutations), p16 (2 mutations), PALB2 (1 mutation), and Lynch syndrome (4 mutations). BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence was 13.7% in Ashkenazi Jewish (AJ) patients (95 patients) and 7.1% in non-AJ patients (56 patients). In AJ patients with a strong, weak, or absent family history of BRCA-associated cancers, the mutation prevalence was 16.7%, 15.8%, and 7.4%, respectively. The mean age at the time of diagnosis in all mutation carriers was 58.5 years (range, 45-75 years) compared with 64 years (range, 27-87 years) in those not carrying a mutation (P = .02). Although BRCA2 was the most common mutation identified, no patients with early-onset PAC (diagnosed at age ≤ 50 years) harbored a BRCA2 mutation and the mean age at diagnosis in BRCA2 carriers was equivalent to that of individuals who were not mutation carriers (P = .34). Mutation prevalence in patients with early-onset disease (21 patients) was 28.6%, including BRCA1 (2 mutations), p16 (2 mutations), MSH2 (1 mutation), and MLH1 (1 mutation). CONCLUSIONS: Mutations in BRCA2 account for > 50% of patients with PAC with an identified susceptibility syndrome. AJ patients were found to have high BRCA1/BRCA2 prevalence regardless of personal/family history, suggesting that ancestry alone indicates a need for genetic evaluation. With the exception of BRCA2-associated PAC, an inherited predisposition for PAC is associated with an earlier age at PAC diagnosis, suggesting that this subset of patients may also represent a population warranting further evaluation.

14 Article Common variation at 2p13.3, 3q29, 7p13 and 17q25.1 associated with susceptibility to pancreatic cancer. 2015

Childs, Erica J / Mocci, Evelina / Campa, Daniele / Bracci, Paige M / Gallinger, Steven / Goggins, Michael / Li, Donghui / Neale, Rachel E / Olson, Sara H / Scelo, Ghislaine / Amundadottir, Laufey T / Bamlet, William R / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Blackford, Amanda / Borges, Michael / Brennan, Paul / Brenner, Hermann / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Canzian, Federico / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia M / Chaffee, Kari G / Chanock, Stephen J / Cleary, Sean P / Cotterchio, Michelle / Foretova, Lenka / Fuchs, Charles / Funel, Niccola / Gazouli, Maria / Hassan, Manal / Herman, Joseph M / Holcatova, Ivana / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hoover, Robert N / Hung, Rayjean J / Janout, Vladimir / Key, Timothy J / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Stefano / Lu, Lingeng / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Mambrini, Andrea / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Neoptolemos, John P / Oberg, Ann L / Orlow, Irene / Pasquali, Claudio / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Saldia, Amethyst / Scarpa, Aldo / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Strobel, Oliver / Tavano, Francesca / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vodicka, Pavel / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Klein, Alison P. ·Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2] Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Kelvin Grove,Queensland, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, US Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. [4] Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Università Vita Salute San Raffaele and Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico (IRCCS) Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute and Medical Faculty Masaryk University, Brno, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, Section of Genetics, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Azienda USL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit and Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · ARC-NET-Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Nutritional Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, US National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences, Prague, Czech Republic. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #26098869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the developed world. Both inherited high-penetrance mutations in BRCA2 (ref. 2), ATM, PALB2 (ref. 4), BRCA1 (ref. 5), STK11 (ref. 6), CDKN2A and mismatch-repair genes and low-penetrance loci are associated with increased risk. To identify new risk loci, we performed a genome-wide association study on 9,925 pancreatic cancer cases and 11,569 controls, including 4,164 newly genotyped cases and 3,792 controls in 9 studies from North America, Central Europe and Australia. We identified three newly associated regions: 17q25.1 (LINC00673, rs11655237, odds ratio (OR) = 1.26, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.19-1.34, P = 1.42 × 10(-14)), 7p13 (SUGCT, rs17688601, OR = 0.88, 95% CI = 0.84-0.92, P = 1.41 × 10(-8)) and 3q29 (TP63, rs9854771, OR = 0.89, 95% CI = 0.85-0.93, P = 2.35 × 10(-8)). We detected significant association at 2p13.3 (ETAA1, rs1486134, OR = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.09-1.19, P = 3.36 × 10(-9)), a region with previous suggestive evidence in Han Chinese. We replicated previously reported associations at 9q34.2 (ABO), 13q22.1 (KLF5), 5p15.33 (TERT and CLPTM1), 13q12.2 (PDX1), 1q32.1 (NR5A2), 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT), 16q23.1 (BCAR1) and 22q12.1 (ZNRF3). Our study identifies new loci associated with pancreatic cancer risk.

15 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

16 Article Diabetes, antidiabetic medications, and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2014

Bosetti, C / Rosato, V / Li, D / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Neale, R E / Muscat, J / Anderson, K / Gallinger, S / Olson, S H / Miller, A B / Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita, H / Scelo, G / Janout, V / Holcatova, I / Lagiou, P / Serraino, D / Lucenteforte, E / Fabianova, E / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Foretova, L / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Prizment, A / Cotterchio, M / Cleary, S / Kurtz, R C / Maisonneuve, P / Trichopoulos, D / Polesel, J / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy. · M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA. · Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State. · Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA. · University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc. · Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano. · Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy. · Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia. · Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS - Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan, Italy M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda Department of Health Sciences Research, Medicine and Medical Genetics, Mayo Clinic, Rochester Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, USA Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Australia Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University, Penn State Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, USA University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU), Utrecht, The Netherlands Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano Department of Preclinical and Clinical Pharmacology Mario Aiazzi Mancini, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Florence, Italy Regional Authority of Public Health in Banská Bystrica, Banská Bystrica, Slovakia Public Health, Women · Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia. · Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic. · Louisiana State University School of Public Health, New Orleans, USA. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · The Tisch Cancer Institute and Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, USA. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #25057164.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an excess risk of pancreatic cancer, but the magnitude of the risk and the time-risk relationship are unclear, and there is limited information on the role of antidiabetic medications. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed individual-level data from 15 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium, including 8305 cases and 13 987 controls. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from multiple logistic regression models, adjusted for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Overall, 1155 (15%) cases and 1087 (8%) controls reported a diagnosis of diabetes 2 or more years before cancer diagnosis (or interview, for controls), corresponding to an OR of 1.90 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.72-2.09). Consistent risk estimates were observed across strata of selected covariates, including body mass index and tobacco smoking. Pancreatic cancer risk decreased with duration of diabetes, but a significant excess risk was still evident 20 or more years after diabetes diagnosis (OR 1.30, 95% CI 1.03-1.63). Among diabetics, long duration of oral antidiabetic use was associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk (OR 0.31, 95% CI 0.14-0.69, for ≥15 years). Conversely, insulin use was associated with a pancreatic cancer risk in the short term (OR 5.60, 95% CI 3.75-8.35, for <5 years), but not for longer duration of use (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.53-1.70, for ≥15 years). CONCLUSION: This study provides the most definitive quantification to date of an excess risk of pancreatic cancer among diabetics. It also shows that a 30% excess risk persists for more than two decades after diabetes diagnosis, thus supporting a causal role of diabetes in pancreatic cancer. Oral antidiabetics may decrease the risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas insulin showed an inconsistent duration-risk relationship.

17 Article Imputation and subset-based association analysis across different cancer types identifies multiple independent risk loci in the TERT-CLPTM1L region on chromosome 5p15.33. 2014

Wang, Zhaoming / Zhu, Bin / Zhang, Mingfeng / Parikh, Hemang / Jia, Jinping / Chung, Charles C / Sampson, Joshua N / Hoskins, Jason W / Hutchinson, Amy / Burdette, Laurie / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Hautman, Christopher / Raj, Preethi S / Abnet, Christian C / Adjei, Andrew A / Ahlbom, Anders / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Ambrosone, Christine B / Aldrich, Melinda / Amiano, Pilar / Amos, Christopher / Andersson, Ulrika / Andriole, Gerald / Andrulis, Irene L / Arici, Cecilia / Arslan, Alan A / Austin, Melissa A / Baris, Dalsu / Barkauskas, Donald A / Bassig, Bryan A / Beane Freeman, Laura E / Berg, Christine D / Berndt, Sonja I / Bertazzi, Pier Alberto / Biritwum, Richard B / Black, Amanda / Blot, William / Boeing, Heiner / Boffetta, Paolo / Bolton, Kelly / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Brennan, Paul / Brinton, Louise A / Brotzman, Michelle / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Buring, Julie E / Butler, Mary Ann / Cai, Qiuyin / Cancel-Tassin, Geraldine / Canzian, Federico / Cao, Guangwen / Caporaso, Neil E / Carrato, Alfredo / Carreon, Tania / Carta, Angela / Chang, Gee-Chen / Chang, I-Shou / Chang-Claude, Jenny / Che, Xu / Chen, Chien-Jen / Chen, Chih-Yi / Chen, Chung-Hsing / Chen, Constance / Chen, Kuan-Yu / Chen, Yuh-Min / Chokkalingam, Anand P / Chu, Lisa W / Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise / Colditz, Graham A / Colt, Joanne S / Conti, David / Cook, Michael B / Cortessis, Victoria K / Crawford, E David / Cussenot, Olivier / Davis, Faith G / De Vivo, Immaculata / Deng, Xiang / Ding, Ti / Dinney, Colin P / Di Stefano, Anna Luisa / Diver, W Ryan / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne W / Fan, Jin-Hu / Feigelson, Heather Spencer / Feychting, Maria / Figueroa, Jonine D / Flanagan, Adrienne M / Fraumeni, Joseph F / Freedman, Neal D / Fridley, Brooke L / Fuchs, Charles S / Gago-Dominguez, Manuela / Gallinger, Steven / Gao, Yu-Tang / Gapstur, Susan M / Garcia-Closas, Montserrat / Garcia-Closas, Reina / Gastier-Foster, Julie M / Gaziano, J Michael / Gerhard, Daniela S / Giffen, Carol A / Giles, Graham G / Gillanders, Elizabeth M / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gokgoz, Nalan / Goldstein, Alisa M / Gonzalez, Carlos / Gorlick, Richard / Greene, Mark H / Gross, Myron / Grossman, H Barton / Grubb, Robert / Gu, Jian / Guan, Peng / Haiman, Christopher A / Hallmans, Goran / Hankinson, Susan E / Harris, Curtis C / Hartge, Patricia / Hattinger, Claudia / Hayes, Richard B / He, Qincheng / Helman, Lee / Henderson, Brian E / Henriksson, Roger / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith / Hohensee, Chancellor / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hong, Yun-Chul / Hoover, Robert N / Hosgood, H Dean / Hsiao, Chin-Fu / Hsing, Ann W / Hsiung, Chao Agnes / Hu, Nan / Hu, Wei / Hu, Zhibin / Huang, Ming-Shyan / Hunter, David J / Inskip, Peter D / Ito, Hidemi / Jacobs, Eric J / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Ji, Bu-Tian / Johansen, Christoffer / Johansson, Mattias / Johnson, Alison / Kaaks, Rudolf / Kamat, Ashish M / Kamineni, Aruna / Karagas, Margaret / Khanna, Chand / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kim, Christopher / Kim, In-Sam / Kim, Jin Hee / Kim, Yeul Hong / Kim, Young-Chul / Kim, Young Tae / Kang, Chang Hyun / Jung, Yoo Jin / Kitahara, Cari M / Klein, Alison P / Klein, Robert / Kogevinas, Manolis / Koh, Woon-Puay / Kohno, Takashi / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kooperberg, Charles / Kratz, Christian P / Krogh, Vittorio / Kunitoh, Hideo / Kurtz, Robert C / Kurucu, Nilgun / Lan, Qing / Lathrop, Mark / Lau, Ching C / Lecanda, Fernando / Lee, Kyoung-Mu / Lee, Maxwell P / Le Marchand, Loic / Lerner, Seth P / Li, Donghui / Liao, Linda M / Lim, Wei-Yen / Lin, Dongxin / Lin, Jie / Lindstrom, Sara / Linet, Martha S / Lissowska, Jolanta / Liu, Jianjun / Ljungberg, Börje / Lloreta, Josep / Lu, Daru / Ma, Jing / Malats, Nuria / Mannisto, Satu / Marina, Neyssa / Mastrangelo, Giuseppe / Matsuo, Keitaro / McGlynn, Katherine A / McKean-Cowdin, Roberta / McNeill, Lorna H / McWilliams, Robert R / Melin, Beatrice S / Meltzer, Paul S / Mensah, James E / Miao, Xiaoping / Michaud, Dominique S / Mondul, Alison M / Moore, Lee E / Muir, Kenneth / Niwa, Shelley / Olson, Sara H / Orr, Nick / Panico, Salvatore / Park, Jae Yong / Patel, Alpa V / Patino-Garcia, Ana / Pavanello, Sofia / Peeters, Petra H M / Peplonska, Beata / Peters, Ulrike / Petersen, Gloria M / Picci, Piero / Pike, Malcolm C / Porru, Stefano / Prescott, Jennifer / Pu, Xia / Purdue, Mark P / Qiao, You-Lin / Rajaraman, Preetha / Riboli, Elio / Risch, Harvey A / Rodabough, Rebecca J / Rothman, Nathaniel / Ruder, Avima M / Ryu, Jeong-Seon / Sanson, Marc / Schned, Alan / Schumacher, Fredrick R / Schwartz, Ann G / Schwartz, Kendra L / Schwenn, Molly / Scotlandi, Katia / Seow, Adeline / Serra, Consol / Serra, Massimo / Sesso, Howard D / Severi, Gianluca / Shen, Hongbing / Shen, Min / Shete, Sanjay / Shiraishi, Kouya / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Siddiq, Afshan / Sierrasesumaga, Luis / Sierri, Sabina / Loon Sihoe, Alan Dart / Silverman, Debra T / Simon, Matthias / Southey, Melissa C / Spector, Logan / Spitz, Margaret / Stampfer, Meir / Stattin, Par / Stern, Mariana C / Stevens, Victoria L / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Stram, Daniel O / Strom, Sara S / Su, Wu-Chou / Sund, Malin / Sung, Sook Whan / Swerdlow, Anthony / Tan, Wen / Tanaka, Hideo / Tang, Wei / Tang, Ze-Zhang / Tardon, Adonina / Tay, Evelyn / Taylor, Philip R / Tettey, Yao / Thomas, David M / Tirabosco, Roberto / Tjonneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Toro, Jorge R / Travis, Ruth C / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Troisi, Rebecca / Truelove, Ann / Tsai, Ying-Huang / Tucker, Margaret A / Tumino, Rosario / Van Den Berg, David / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vermeulen, Roel / Vineis, Paolo / Visvanathan, Kala / Vogel, Ulla / Wang, Chaoyu / Wang, Chengfeng / Wang, Junwen / Wang, Sophia S / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wheeler, William / White, Emily / Wiencke, John K / Wolk, Alicja / Wolpin, Brian M / Wong, Maria Pik / Wrensch, Margaret / Wu, Chen / Wu, Tangchun / Wu, Xifeng / Wu, Yi-Long / Wunder, Jay S / Xiang, Yong-Bing / Xu, Jun / Yang, Hannah P / Yang, Pan-Chyr / Yatabe, Yasushi / Ye, Yuanqing / Yeboah, Edward D / Yin, Zhihua / Ying, Chen / Yu, Chong-Jen / Yu, Kai / Yuan, Jian-Min / Zanetti, Krista A / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Zheng, Wei / Zhou, Baosen / Mirabello, Lisa / Savage, Sharon A / Kraft, Peter / Chanock, Stephen J / Yeager, Meredith / Landi, Maria Terese / Shi, Jianxin / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics. · Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, PO BOX 77, Accra, Ghana, University of Ghana Medical School, PO Box 4236, Accra, Ghana. · Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine. · Clinical Trial Service Unit and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Department of Cancer Prevention and Control, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain, CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiologia y Salud Publica, Madrid, Spain. · Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, NH, USA. · Department of Radiation Sciences, Oncology. · Division of Urologic Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Litwin Centre for Cancer Genetics, Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mt Sinai Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Medical and Surgical Specialties, Radiological Sciences and Public Health, University of Brescia, Italy. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Biostatistics Division, Keck School of Medicine and. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Division of Environmental Health Sciences, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Cancer Prevention. · Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Department of Preventive Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda Policlinico Hospital, Milan, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN, USA, International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Germany. · Institute for Translational Epidemiology, Hematology and Medical Oncology, Mount Sinai Hospital School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 2RE, UK. · Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM) and Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Westat, Rockville, MD, USA. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA. · Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH, USA. · CeRePP, Paris, France, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC n°5, ONCOTYPE-URO, Paris, France. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China. · Medical Oncology Department, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Faculty of Medicine, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, Division of Chest Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan. · National Institute of Cancer Research. · Department of Abdominal Surgery and. · Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan. · Cancer Center, China Medical University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital and National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan. · Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine and Chest Department, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, College of Medical Science and Technology, Taipei Medical University, Taiwan. · School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, USA. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Villejuif, France. · Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Urologic Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA. · CeRePP, Paris, France, AP-HP, Department of Urology, Tenon Hospital, GHU-Est, Paris, France, UPMC Univ Paris 06, GRC n°5, ONCOTYPE-URO, Paris, France. · Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada T6G 2R3. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Shanxi Cancer Hospital, Taiyuan, Shanxi, People's Republic of China. · Department of Urology. · Service de Neurologie Mazarin, GH Pitie-Salpetriere, APHP, and UMR 975 INSERM-UPMC, CRICM, Paris, France. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Shanghai Cancer Institute, Shanghai, People's Republic of China. · Institute for Health Research, Kaiser Permanente, Denver, CO, USA. · UCL Cancer Institute, Huntley Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP, UK. · Department of Biostatistics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA, Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine. · Genomic Medicine Group, Galician Foundation of Genomic Medicine, Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Santiago, Servicio Galego de Saude (SERGAS), Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria de Santiago (IDIS), Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute and. · Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotaong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Division of Genetics and Epidemiology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK. · Unidad de Investigación, Hospital Universitario de Canarias, La Laguna, Spain. · Nationwide Children's Hospital, and The Ohio State University Department of Pathology and Pediatrics, Columbus, OH, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine and Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. · Office of Cancer Genomics, Department of Health and Human Services, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Information Management Services Inc., Calverton, MD, USA. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, The Cancer Council Victoria & Centre for Molecular, Environmental, Genetic, and Analytic Epidemiology, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences and. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Nutrition and. · Department of Oncology, Department of Pathology and Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Programme, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, School of Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Department of Urology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO, USA. · Department of Epidemiology. · Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, China Medical University, Shenyang, China. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine/Nutritional Research. · Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine. · Laboratory of Human Carcinogenesis, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Laboratory of Experimental Oncology, Orthopaedic Rizzoli Institute, Bologna, Italy. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Department of Population Health, New York University Langone Medical Center and Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Center for Cancer Research and. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea, Department of Preventive Medicine and. · Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. · Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Institute of Population Health Sciences and Taiwan Lung Cancer Tissue/Specimen Information Resource Center, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Taiwan. · Cancer Prevention Institute of California, Fremont, CA, USA, Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA. · Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Institute of Population Health Sciences and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Cancer Center, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, China. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA, Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA, Bioinformed, LLC, Gaithersburg, MD, USA. · Department of Oncology, Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark, Unit of Survivorship, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine. · Vermont Cancer Registry, Burlington, VT, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, UK. · Department of Biochemistry and Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea. · Institute of Environmental Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Genomic Research Center for Lung and Breast/Ovarian Cancers, Korea University Anam Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea, Department of Internal Medicine and Division of Brain and Division of Oncology/Hematology, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Lung and Esophageal Cancer Clinic, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun-eup, Republic of Korea. · Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Department of Oncology, Department of Pathology and Department of Medicine, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA, Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD, USA. · Department of Medicine and. · Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain, IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute), Barcelona, Spain, CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore, Singapore, Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan. · Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI, USA. · Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Division of Genome Biology, National Cancer Center Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan, Department of Respiratory Medicine, Mitsui Memorial Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pediatric Oncology, A.Y. Ankara Oncology Training and Research Hospital, Yenimahalle- Ankara, Turkey. · Centre National de Genotypage, IG/CEA, Evry Cedex, France, Centre d'Étude du Polymorphism Humain (CEPH), Paris, France. · Texas Children's Cancer and Hematology Centers. · Department of Pediatrics, University Clinic of Navarra, Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Department of Preventive Medicine and Department of Environmental Health, Korea National Open University, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Scott Department of Urology and. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology. · Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore, Singapore. · State Key Laboratory of Molecular Oncology, Cancer Institute and Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland. · Human Genetics Division, Genome Institute of Singapore, Singapore, School of Life Sciences, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Urology and Andrology and. · CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. · Ministry of Education Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China, State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering, School of Life Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai, China. · Department of Medicine, Channing Division of Network Medicine and Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncologicas, Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, Madrid E-28029, Spain. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA. · Department of Cardiac, Thoracic and Vascular Sciences, University of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan, Department of Preventive Medicine, Kyushu University Faculty of Medical Scicence, Fukuoka, Japan. · Department of Health Disparities Research, Division of OVP, Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, and Center for Community-Engaged Translational Research, Duncan Family Institute and. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Key Laboratory for Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Sciences and Technology, Wuhan, China. · Department of Epidemiology, Division of Biology and Medicine, Brown University, Providence, RI, USA. · Health Sciences Research Institute, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Complex Traits Genetics Team and. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Department of Biochemistry and Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Daegu, Republic of Korea, Lung Cancer Center, Kyungpook National University Medical Center, Daegu, Republic of Korea. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Cancer Institute (Hospital), Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of China. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Inha University College of Medicine, Incheon, Korea. · Karmanos Cancer Institute and Department of Oncology and. · Karmanos Cancer Institute and Department of Family Medicine and Public Health Sciences, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA. · Maine Cancer Registry, Augusta, ME, USA. · Centre for Research in Occupational Health, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain, CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP). · Department of Biostatistics, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bonn Medical Center, Bonn, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, National Cheng Kung University Hospital and College of Medicine, Tainan, Taiwan. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences/Surgery, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, Seoul, South Korea. · Division of Genetics and Epidemiology, Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton, UK, Division of Breast Cancer Research, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología, Universidad de Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain. · Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, St Andrew's Place, East Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex HA7 4LP, UK. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Chiayi, Taiwan. · Cancer Registry Associazione Iblea Ricerca Epidemiologica, Onlus and Asp Ragusa, Ragusa Italy. · Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, CA, USA. · Division of Environmental Epidemiology, Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Imperial College, London, UK, Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino Italy. · National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Soborg, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA, Department of Biochemistry and Centre for Genomic Sciences, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China. · Division of Cancer Etiology, Department of Population Sciences, City of Hope and the Beckman Research Institute, Duarte, CA, USA. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway, Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland. · University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Pathology and. · Guangdong Lung Cancer Institute, Medical Research Center and Cancer Center of Guangdong General Hospital, Guangdong Academy of Medical Sciences, Guangzhou, China. · School of Public Health, Li Ka Shing (LKS) Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China. · Department of Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital and. · University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, USA and. · Department of Population Health, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA, New York University Cancer Institute, New York, NY, USA. · Program in Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #25027329.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped risk alleles for at least 10 distinct cancers to a small region of 63 000 bp on chromosome 5p15.33. This region harbors the TERT and CLPTM1L genes; the former encodes the catalytic subunit of telomerase reverse transcriptase and the latter may play a role in apoptosis. To investigate further the genetic architecture of common susceptibility alleles in this region, we conducted an agnostic subset-based meta-analysis (association analysis based on subsets) across six distinct cancers in 34 248 cases and 45 036 controls. Based on sequential conditional analysis, we identified as many as six independent risk loci marked by common single-nucleotide polymorphisms: five in the TERT gene (Region 1: rs7726159, P = 2.10 × 10(-39); Region 3: rs2853677, P = 3.30 × 10(-36) and PConditional = 2.36 × 10(-8); Region 4: rs2736098, P = 3.87 × 10(-12) and PConditional = 5.19 × 10(-6), Region 5: rs13172201, P = 0.041 and PConditional = 2.04 × 10(-6); and Region 6: rs10069690, P = 7.49 × 10(-15) and PConditional = 5.35 × 10(-7)) and one in the neighboring CLPTM1L gene (Region 2: rs451360; P = 1.90 × 10(-18) and PConditional = 7.06 × 10(-16)). Between three and five cancers mapped to each independent locus with both risk-enhancing and protective effects. Allele-specific effects on DNA methylation were seen for a subset of risk loci, indicating that methylation and subsequent effects on gene expression may contribute to the biology of risk variants on 5p15.33. Our results provide strong support for extensive pleiotropy across this region of 5p15.33, to an extent not previously observed in other cancer susceptibility loci.

18 Article Serum immunoglobulin e and risk of pancreatic cancer in the prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer screening trial. 2014

Olson, Sara H / Hsu, Meier / Wiemels, Joseph L / Bracci, Paige M / Zhou, Mi / Patoka, Joseph / Reisacher, William R / Wang, Julie / Kurtz, Robert C / Silverman, Debra T / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Authors' Affiliations: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; olsons@mskcc.org. · Authors' Affiliations: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics; · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California; · Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York; · Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Mt. Sinai Medical Center; · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; · Occupational and Environmental Epidemiology Branch; and. · Branch of Nutritional Epidemiology, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24718282.

ABSTRACT: Epidemiologic studies have consistently found that self-reported allergies are associated with reduced risk of pancreatic cancer. Our aim was to prospectively assess the relationship between serum immunoglobulin E (IgE), a marker of allergy, and risk. This nested case-control study within the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) included subjects enrolled in 1994 to 2001 and followed through 2010. There were 283 cases of pancreatic cancer and 544 controls matched on age, gender, race, and calendar date of blood draw. Using the ImmunoCAP system, we measured total IgE (normal, borderline, elevated), IgE to respiratory allergens, and IgE to food allergens (negative or positive) in serum collected at baseline. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. We assessed interactions with age, gender, smoking, body mass index, and time between randomization and case diagnosis. Overall, there was no association between the IgE measures and risk. We found a statistically significant interaction by baseline age: in those aged ≥65 years, elevated risks were observed for borderline total IgE (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 0.88-2.32) and elevated total IgE (OR, 1.98; 95% CI, 1.16-3.37) and positive IgE to food allergens (OR, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.29-6.20); among participants <65 years, ORs were <1. Other interactions were not statistically significant. The reduced risk of pancreatic cancer associated with self-reported allergies is not reflected in serum IgE.

19 Article An absolute risk model to identify individuals at elevated risk for pancreatic cancer in the general population. 2013

Klein, Alison P / Lindström, Sara / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Steplowski, Emily / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Lacroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Zheng, Wei / Amundadottir, Laufey / Albanes, Demetrius / Allen, Naomi E / Bamlet, William R / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / Duell, Eric J / Elena, Joanne / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hassan, Manal / Hutchinson, Amy / Hunter, David J / Kooperberg, Charles / Kurtz, Robert C / Liu, Simin / Overvad, Kim / Palli, Domenico / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Slimani, Nadia / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Vineis, Paolo / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Chanock, Stephen J / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Kraft, Peter. ·Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America ; Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #24058443.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We developed an absolute risk model to identify individuals in the general population at elevated risk of pancreatic cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Using data on 3,349 cases and 3,654 controls from the PanScan Consortium, we developed a relative risk model for men and women of European ancestry based on non-genetic and genetic risk factors for pancreatic cancer. We estimated absolute risks based on these relative risks and population incidence rates. RESULTS: Our risk model included current smoking (multivariable adjusted odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval: 2.20 [1.84-2.62]), heavy alcohol use (>3 drinks/day) (OR: 1.45 [1.19-1.76]), obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) (OR: 1.26 [1.09-1.45]), diabetes >3 years (nested case-control OR: 1.57 [1.13-2.18], case-control OR: 1.80 [1.40-2.32]), family history of pancreatic cancer (OR: 1.60 [1.20-2.12]), non-O ABO genotype (AO vs. OO genotype) (OR: 1.23 [1.10-1.37]) to (BB vs. OO genotype) (OR 1.58 [0.97-2.59]), rs3790844(chr1q32.1) (OR: 1.29 [1.19-1.40]), rs401681(5p15.33) (OR: 1.18 [1.10-1.26]) and rs9543325(13q22.1) (OR: 1.27 [1.18-1.36]). The areas under the ROC curve for risk models including only non-genetic factors, only genetic factors, and both non-genetic and genetic factors were 58%, 57% and 61%, respectively. We estimate that fewer than 3/1,000 U.S. non-Hispanic whites have more than a 5% predicted lifetime absolute risk. CONCLUSION: Although absolute risk modeling using established risk factors may help to identify a group of individuals at higher than average risk of pancreatic cancer, the immediate clinical utility of our model is limited. However, a risk model can increase awareness of the various risk factors for pancreatic cancer, including modifiable behaviors.

20 Article Ulcer, gastric surgery and pancreatic cancer risk: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2013

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Bracci, P M / Negri, E / Neale, R E / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Maisonneuve, P / Zeegers, M P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, IRCCS, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche 'Mario Negri', Milan. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #23970016.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Peptic ulcer and its treatments have been associated to pancreatic cancer risk, although the evidence is inconsistent. METHODS: We pooled 10 case-control studies within the Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium (PanC4), including 4717 pancreatic cancer cases and 9374 controls, and estimated summary odds ratios (OR) using multivariable logistic regression models. RESULTS: The OR for pancreatic cancer was 1.10 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.98-1.23] for history of ulcer (OR = 1.08 for gastric and 0.97 for duodenal ulcer). The association was stronger for a diagnosis within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 2.43 for peptic, 1.75 for gastric, and 1.98 for duodenal ulcer). The OR was 1.53 (95% CI 1.15-2.03) for history of gastrectomy; however, the excess risk was limited to a gastrectomy within 2 years before cancer diagnosis (OR = 6.18, 95% CI 1.82-20.96), while no significant increased risk was observed for longer time since gastrectomy. No associations were observed for pharmacological treatments for ulcer, such as antacids, H2-receptor antagonists, or proton-pump inhibitors. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large collaborative study does not support the hypothesis that peptic ulcer and its treatment materially affect pancreatic cancer risk. The increased risk for short-term history of ulcer and gastrectomy suggests that any such association is due to increased cancer surveillance.

21 Article Allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2013

Olson, Sara H / Hsu, Meier / Satagopan, Jaya M / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Silverman, Debra T / Lucenteforte, Ersilia / Anderson, Kristin E / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dai, Qi / Duell, Eric J / Fontham, Elizabeth H / Gallinger, Steven / Holly, Elizabeth A / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lowenfels, Albert B / Luckett, Brian / Ludwig, Emmy / Petersen, Gloria M / Polesel, Jerry / Seminara, Daniela / Strayer, Lori / Talamini, Renato / Anonymous6651223. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 307 East 63rd Street, New York, NY 10065, USA. olsons@mskcc.org ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #23820785.

ABSTRACT: In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001). Heterogeneity was attributable to one study; with that study excluded, the pooled odds ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.84) (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). Hay fever (odds ratio = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.96) and allergy to animals (odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94) were related to lower risk, while there was no statistically significant association with other allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age.

22 Article Biliary self-expandable metal stents do not adversely affect pancreaticoduodenectomy. 2013

Cavell, Lianne K / Allen, Peter J / Vinoya, Cjloe / Eaton, Anne A / Gonen, Mithat / Gerdes, Hans / Mendelsohn, Robin B / D'Angelica, Michael I / Kingham, T Peter / Fong, Yuman / Dematteo, Ronald / Jarnagin, William R / Kurtz, Robert C / Schattner, Mark A. ·Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #23545711.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Controversy exists regarding whether to place a plastic or a metal endobiliary stent in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer who require biliary drainage. Although self-expandable metal stents (SEMS) provide better drainage compared with plastic stents, concerns remain that SEMS may compromise resection and increase postoperative complications. Our objective was to compare surgical outcomes of patients undergoing pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) with SEMS in place vs. plastic endoscopic stents (PES) and no stents (NS). METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis from a prospective database of all patients undergoing either attempted or successful PD with SEMS, PES, or NS in place at the time of operation. Patients were compared with regard to perioperative complications, margin status, and the rate of intraoperative determination of unresectability. RESULTS: A total of 593 patients underwent attempted PD. Of these, 84 patients were locally unresectable intraoperatively and 509 underwent successful PD, of which 71 had SEMS, 149 had PES, and 289 had NS. Among patients who had a preoperative stent, SEMS did not increase overall or serious postoperative complications, 30-day mortality, length of stay, biliary anastomotic leak, or positive margin, but was associated with more wound infections and longer operative times. In those with adenocarcinoma, intraoperative determination of local unresectability was similar in the SEMS group compared with other groups, with 16 (19.3%) in SEMS compared with 29 (17.7%) in PES (P=0.862), and 31 (17.5%) in NS (P=0.732). CONCLUSIONS: Placement of SEMS is not contraindicated in patients with resectable pancreatic cancer who require preoperative biliary drainage.

23 Article Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4. 2013

Leenders, Max / Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi / Vineis, Paolo / Stevens, Victoria / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Amundadottir, Laufey / Gross, Myron / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Duell, Eric J / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / Kooperberg, Charles / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Kai / Wolpin, Brian M / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovanucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Tjønneland, Anne / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Elena, Joanne W / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. M.Leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23334854.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed. METHODS: Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. RESULTS: When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95 %CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95 %CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

24 Article Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Duell, E J / Lucenteforte, E / Olson, S H / Bracci, P M / Li, D / Risch, H A / Silverman, D T / Ji, B T / Gallinger, S / Holly, E A / Fontham, E H / Maisonneuve, P / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Ghadirian, P / Kurtz, R C / Ludwig, E / Yu, H / Lowenfels, A B / Seminara, D / Petersen, G M / La Vecchia, C / Boffetta, P. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22767586.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatitis is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, an unknown fraction of the disease is thought to be a consequence of tumor-related duct obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A pooled analysis of a history of pancreatitis and risk of pancreatic cancer was carried out considering the time interval between diagnoses and potential modification by covariates. Adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from 10 case-control studies (5048 cases of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 10,947 controls) taking part in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). RESULTS: The association between pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer was nearly three-fold at intervals of >2 years between diagnoses (OR: 2.71, 95% CI: 1.96-3.74) and much stronger at intervals of ≤2 years (OR: 13.56, 95% CI: 8.72-21.90) probably reflecting a combination of reverse causation and antecedent misdiagnosis of pancreas cancer as pancreatitis. The younger (<65 years) pancreatic cancer cases showed stronger associations with previous (>2 years) pancreatitis (OR: 3.91, 95% CI: 2.53-6.04) than the older (≥65 years) cases (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.02-2.76; P value for interaction: 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a moderately strong association between pancreatitis (diagnosed before >2 years) and pancreatic cancer, the population attributable fraction was estimated at 1.34% (95% CI: 0.612-2.07%), suggesting that a relatively small proportion of pancreatic cancer might be avoided if pancreatitis could be prevented.

25 Article A replication study and genome-wide scan of single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with pancreatic cancer risk and overall survival. 2012

Willis, Jason A / Olson, Sara H / Orlow, Irene / Mukherjee, Semanti / McWilliams, Robert R / Kurtz, Robert C / Klein, Robert J. ·Program in Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #22665904.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To explore the effects of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on pancreatic cancer risk and overall survival (OS). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The germ line DNA of 531 pancreatic cancer cases and 305 healthy controls from a hospital-based study was genotyped at SNPs previously reported to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk or clinical outcome. We analyzed putative risk SNPs for replication of their reported effects on risk and tested for novel effects on OS. Similarly, we analyzed putative survival-associated SNPs for replication of their reported effects on OS and tested for novel effects on risk. Finally, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OS using a subset of 252 cases, with two subsequent validation sets of 261 and 572 patients, respectively. RESULTS: Among seven risk SNPs analyzed, two (rs505922 and rs9543325) were associated with risk (P < 0.05). Among 24 survival-associated SNPs analyzed, one (rs9350) was associated with OS (P < 0.05). No putative risk SNPs or putative survival-associated SNPs were found to be associated with OS or risk, respectively. Furthermore, our GWAS identified a novel SNP [rs1482426, combined stage I and II, P = 1.7 × 10(-6), per-allele HR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38-2.18] to be putatively associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of SNPs on pancreatic cancer risk and OS were replicated in our study, although further work is necessary to understand the functional mechanisms underlying these effects. More importantly, the putative association with OS identified by GWAS suggests that GWAS may be useful in identifying SNPs associated with clinical outcome in pancreatic cancer.

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