Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Vittorio Krogh
Based on 11 articles published since 2010
(Why 11 articles?)
||||

Between 2010 and 2020, V. Krogh wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Helicobacter pylori infection, chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort: A nested case-control study. 2017

Huang, Jiaqi / Zagai, Ulrika / Hallmans, Göran / Nyrén, Olof / Engstrand, Lars / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Duell, Eric J / Overvad, Kim / Katzke, Verena A / Kaaks, Rudolf / Jenab, Mazda / Park, Jin Young / Murillo, Raul / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Lagiou, Pagona / Bamia, Christina / Bradbury, Kathryn E / Riboli, Elio / Aune, Dagfinn / Tsilidis, Konstantinos K / Capellá, Gabriel / Agudo, Antonio / Krogh, Vittorio / Palli, Domenico / Panico, Salvatore / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Tjønneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Martínez, Begoña / Redondo-Sanchez, Daniel / Chirlaque, Maria-Dolores / Hm Peeters, Petra / Regnér, Sara / Lindkvist, Björn / Naccarati, Alessio / Ardanaz, Eva / Larrañaga, Nerea / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Rebours, Vinciane / Barré, Amélie / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Ye, Weimin. ·Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden. · Department of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Metabolic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, MD. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Prevention and Implementation Group, Section of Early Detection and Prevention, Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. · Translational Research Laboratory, IDIBELL-Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer. Cancer Epidemiology Research Program. Catalan Institute of Oncology-IDIBELL. L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milano, Italy. · Cancer Risk Factors and Life-Style Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute - ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Dipartimento di medicina clinica e chirurgia Federico II, Naples, Italy. · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Institute of Population-Based Cancer Research, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, Granada, Spain. · CIBER of Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs, Granada, Hospitales Universitarios de Granada/Universidad de Granada, Granada, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Health and Social Sciences, Universidad de Murcia, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Institution of Clinical Sciences Malmö, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. · Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Human Genetics Foundation, Turin, Italy. · Navarra Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; IdiSNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, Regional Government of the Basque Country, Spain. · Hormones and Women's Health Team, INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Villejuif, F-94805, France. · Université Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, F-94805, France. · Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, F-94805, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, University Paris 7, Clichy, France. · Université Paris Sud and Gastroenterology Unit, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris Sud, CHU de Bicêtre, AP-HP, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, France. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28032715.

ABSTRACT: The association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk remains controversial. We conducted a nested case-control study with 448 pancreatic cancer cases and their individually matched control subjects, based on the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort, to determine whether there was an altered pancreatic cancer risk associated with H. pylori infection and chronic corpus atrophic gastritis. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs), adjusted for matching factors and other potential confounders. Our results showed that pancreatic cancer risk was neither associated with H. pylori seropositivity (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.70, 1.31) nor CagA seropositivity (OR = 1.07; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.48). We also did not find any excess risk among individuals seropositive for H. pylori but seronegative for CagA, compared with the group seronegative for both antibodies (OR = 0.94; 95% CI: 0.63, 1.38). However, we found that chronic corpus atrophic gastritis was non-significantly associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (OR = 1.35; 95% CI: 0.77, 2.37), and although based on small numbers, the excess risk was particularly marked among individuals seronegative for both H. pylori and CagA (OR = 5.66; 95% CI: 1.59, 20.19, p value for interaction < 0.01). Our findings provided evidence supporting the null association between H. pylori infection and pancreatic cancer risk in western European populations. However, the suggested association between chronic corpus atrophic gastritis and pancreatic cancer risk warrants independent verification in future studies, and, if confirmed, further studies on the underlying mechanisms.

2 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

3 Article Sweet-beverage consumption and risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 2016

Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva M / Wark, Petra A / Romaguera, Dora / Bhoo-Pathy, Nirmala / Michaud, Dominique / Molina-Montes, Esther / Tjønneland, Anne / Olsen, Anja / Overvad, Kim / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Fagherazzi, Guy / Katzke, Verena A / Kühn, Tilman / Steffen, Annika / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Klinaki, Eleni / Papatesta, Eleni-Maria / Masala, Giovanna / Krogh, Vittorio / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Peeters, Petra H / Rylander, Charlotta / Parr, Christine L / Skeie, Guri / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Dorronsoro, Miren / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Wareham, Nick / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Travis, Ruth C / Key, Tim / Stepien, Magdalena / Freisling, Heinz / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Department of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, Miguel Hernández University, Alicante, Spain; The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Physiopathology of Obesity and Nutrition (CIBEROBN), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Medical Research Institute of Palma, University Hospital Son Espases, Palma de Mallorca, Spain; mariaadoracion.romaguera@ssib.es. · Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; · Department of Public Health and Community Medicine, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Andalusian School of Public Health. Biomedical Research Institute of Granada; University Hospital of Granada/Granada University, Granada, Spain; · Diet, Genes and Environment, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark; · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus C, Denmark; · Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health team, National Institute for Health and Medical Research, Villejuif, France; UMRS 1018, Université Paris Sud, Villejuif, France; Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France; · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, Germany; · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition, Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece; · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece; · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy; · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit. Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy; · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Italy; · Human Genetics Foundation,Torino, Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, Torino, Italy; · Dipartamento di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia, Federico II University of Naples, Naples, Italy; · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; · Department of Chronic Diseases, Division of Epidemiology, Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; · Department of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø-the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway; Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland; · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain; · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Public Health Direction Biodonostia Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain; · The Spanish Biomedical Research Centre in Epidemology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Health Institute Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain; · Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit. · Department of Public Health and Primary Care, and Clinical Gerontology Unit, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom; · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; · Nutrition and Metabolism Section, International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France; · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, and Julius Centre University of Malaya, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, Netherlands; and Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center, Utrecht, Netherlands. ·Am J Clin Nutr · Pubmed #27510540.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The consumption of sweet beverages has been associated with greater risk of type 2 diabetes and obesity, which may be involved in the development of pancreatic cancer. Therefore, it has been hypothesized that sweet beverages may increase pancreatic cancer risk as well. OBJECTIVE: We examined the association between sweet-beverage consumption (including total, sugar-sweetened, and artificially sweetened soft drink and juice and nectar consumption) and pancreatic cancer risk. DESIGN: The study was conducted within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. A total of 477,199 participants (70.2% women) with a mean age of 51 y at baseline were included, and 865 exocrine pancreatic cancers were diagnosed after a median follow-up of 11.60 y (IQR: 10.10-12.60 y). Sweet-beverage consumption was assessed with the use of validated dietary questionnaires at baseline. HRs and 95% CIs were obtained with the use of multivariable Cox regression models that were stratified by age, sex, and center and adjusted for educational level, physical activity, smoking status, and alcohol consumption. Associations with total soft-drink consumption were adjusted for juice and nectar consumption and vice versa. RESULTS: Total soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.07), sugar-sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.02; 95% CI: 0.97, 1.08), and artificially sweetened soft-drink consumption (HR per 100 g/d: 1.04; 95% CI: 0.98, 1.10) were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption was inversely associated with pancreatic cancer risk (HR per 100 g/d: 0.91; 95% CI: 0.84, 0.99); this association remained statistically significant after adjustment for body size, type 2 diabetes, and energy intake. CONCLUSIONS: Soft-drink consumption does not seem to be associated with pancreatic cancer risk. Juice and nectar consumption might be associated with a modest decreased pancreatic cancer risk. Additional studies with specific information on juice and nectar subtypes are warranted to clarify these results.

4 Article Flavonoid and lignan intake and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition cohort. 2016

Molina-Montes, Esther / Sánchez, María-José / Zamora-Ros, Raul / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Wark, Petra A / Obon-Santacana, Mireia / Kühn, Tilman / Katzke, Verena / Travis, Ruth C / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Naccarati, Alessio / Mattiello, Amalia / Krogh, Vittorio / Martorana, Caterina / Masala, Giovanna / Amiano, Pilar / Huerta, José-María / Barricarte, Aurelio / Quirós, José-Ramón / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Angell Åsli, Lene / Skeie, Guri / Ericson, Ulrika / Sonestedt, Emily / Peeters, Petra H / Romieu, Isabelle / Scalbert, Augustin / Overvad, Kim / Clemens, Matthias / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Peppa, Eleni / Vidalis, Pavlos / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick / Olsen, Anja / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutroun-Rualt, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Cross, Amanda J / Lu, Yunxia / Riboli, Elio / Duell, Eric J. ·Andalusian School of Public Health, Instituto De Investigación Biosanitaria Ibs, GRANADA, Hospitales Universitarios De Granada/Universidad De Granada, Granada, Spain. · CIBERESP, CIBER Epidemiología Y Salud Pública, Spain. · Section of Nutrition and Metabolism, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Global eHealth Unit, Department of Primary Care and Public Health, the School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-Idibell), Barcelona, Spain. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Molecular and Genetic Epidemiology Unit, HuGeF-Human Genetics Foundation, Torino, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry ASP, Ragusa, Italy. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute-ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Public Health Division of Gipuzkoa, BioDonostia Research Institute, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, IMIB-Arrixaca, Murcia, Spain. · Public Health Institute of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, the Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. · Genetic Epidemiology Group, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Public Health, Section for Epidemiology, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · WHO Collaborating Center for Nutrition and Health, Unit of Nutritional Epidemiology and Nutrition in Public Health, Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology, and Medical Statistics, University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Epidemiology Unit, Medical Research Council, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Inserm, CESP Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, France. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27184434.

ABSTRACT: Despite the potential cancer preventive effects of flavonoids and lignans, their ability to reduce pancreatic cancer risk has not been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. Our aim was to examine the association between dietary intakes of flavonoids and lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. A total of 865 exocrine pancreatic cancer cases occurred after 11.3 years of follow-up of 477,309 cohort members. Dietary flavonoid and lignan intake was estimated through validated dietary questionnaires and the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and Phenol Explorer databases. Hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using age, sex and center-stratified Cox proportional hazards models, adjusted for energy intake, body mass index (BMI), smoking, alcohol and diabetes status. Our results showed that neither overall dietary intake of flavonoids nor of lignans were associated with pancreatic cancer risk (multivariable-adjusted HR for a doubling of intake = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.95-1.11 and 1.02; 95% CI: 0.89-1.17, respectively). Statistically significant associations were also not observed by flavonoid subclasses. An inverse association between intake of flavanones and pancreatic cancer risk was apparent, without reaching statistical significance, in microscopically confirmed cases (HR for a doubling of intake = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.91-1.00). In conclusion, we did not observe an association between intake of flavonoids, flavonoid subclasses or lignans and pancreatic cancer risk in the EPIC cohort.

5 Article Plasma carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols levels and pancreatic cancer risk within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition: a nested case-control study: plasma micronutrients and pancreatic cancer risk. 2015

Jeurnink, Suzanne M / Ros, Martine M / Leenders, Max / van Duijnhoven, Franzel J B / Siersema, Peter D / Jansen, Eugene H J M / van Gils, Carla H / Bakker, Marije F / Overvad, Kim / Roswall, Nina / Tjønneland, Anne / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Racine, Antoine / Cadeau, Claire / Grote, Verena / Kaaks, Rudolf / Aleksandrova, Krasimira / Boeing, Heiner / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Benetou, Vasiliki / Valanou, Elisavet / Palli, Domenico / Krogh, Vittorio / Vineis, Paolo / Tumino, Rosario / Mattiello, Amalia / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Skeie, Guri / Castaño, José María Huerta / Duell, Eric J / Barricarte, Aurelio / Molina-Montes, Esther / Argüelles, Marcial / Dorronsoro, Mire / Johansen, Dorthe / Lindkvist, Björn / Sund, Malin / Crowe, Francesca L / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Jenab, Mazda / Fedirko, Veronika / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B. ·Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, the Netherlands; National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #25175624.

ABSTRACT: Evidence of a protective effect of several antioxidants and other nutrients on pancreatic cancer risk is inconsistent. The aim of this study was to investigate the association for prediagnostic plasma levels of carotenoids, vitamin C, retinol and tocopherols with risk of pancreatic cancer in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). 446 incident exocrine pancreatic cancer cases were matched to 446 controls by age at blood collection, study center, sex, date and time of blood collection, fasting status and hormone use. Plasma carotenoids (α- and β-carotene, lycopene, β-cryptoxanthin, canthaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein), α- and γ-tocopherol and retinol were measured by reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography and plasma vitamin C by a colorimetric assay. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (95%CIs) for pancreatic cancer risk were estimated using a conditional logistic regression analysis, adjusted for smoking status, smoking duration and intensity, waist circumference, cotinine levels and diabetes status. Inverse associations with pancreatic cancer risk were found for plasma β-carotene (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.52, 95%CI 0.31-0.88, p for trend = 0.02), zeaxanthin (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.53, 95%CI 0.30-0.94, p for trend = 0.06) and α-tocopherol (IRR highest vs. lowest quartile 0.62, 95%CI 0.39-0.99, p for trend = 0.08. For α- and β-carotene, lutein, sum of carotenoids and γ-tocopherol, heterogeneity between geographical regions was observed. In conclusion, our results show that higher plasma concentrations of β-carotene, zeaxanthin and α-tocopherol may be inversely associated with risk of pancreatic cancer, but further studies are warranted.

6 Article Genome-wide association study identifies multiple susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Wolpin, Brian M / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Kraft, Peter / Kooperberg, Charles / Petersen, Gloria M / Wang, Zhaoming / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Canzian, Federico / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Jacobs, Eric J / Kamineni, Aruna / Klein, Alison P / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Li, Donghui / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Austin, Melissa A / Barfield, Richard / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Brotzman, Michelle / Büchler, Markus W / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Bugert, Peter / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Chung, Charles / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Funel, Niccola / Gaziano, J Michael / Giese, Nathalia A / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gorman, Megan J / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Henderson, Brian E / Holly, Elizabeth A / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Innocenti, Federico / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / LaCroix, Andrea / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Nakamura, Yusuke / Oberg, Ann L / Owzar, Kouros / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Piepoli, Ada / Porta, Miquel / Real, Francisco X / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Sund, Malin / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Taylor, Philip R / Theodoropoulos, George E / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Wu, Chen / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Fuchs, Charles / Chanock, Stephen J / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. [2]. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. [2]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · 1] Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [3] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. · Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [3] Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · The Cancer Research Center of Hawaii (retired), Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · 1] Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. [2] Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. [2] Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · 1] INSERM, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, Villejuif, France. [2] University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. [3] Institut Gustave Roussy (IGR), Villejuif, France. · Westat, Rockville, Maryland, USA. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · 1] National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [3] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Mannheim, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, DKFZ, Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · 1] Cancer Care Ontario, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. [2] Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · 1] Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [2] Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. [3] Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Prevention and Research Center, Mercy Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Prevention, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · 1] Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3] Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · The University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy, Center for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. · International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · 1] Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [3] Department of Nutrition, National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. · 1] Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. [2] Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Human Genome Center, Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Alliance Statistics and Data Center, Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke Cancer Institute, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, USA. · 1] Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, the Netherlands. [2] Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · Department of Epidemiology, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital 'Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza', Opera di Padre Pio da Pietrelcina, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · 1] Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. [2] Department of Epidemiology, School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. [3] CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · 1] Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. [2] Departament de Ciències i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Toxicogenomics Unit, Center for Toxicology and Safety, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · 1st Propaideutic Surgical Department, Hippocration University Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · 1] Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. [3] Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · 1] Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. [2] New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2]. · 1] Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [2] Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. [3]. · 1] Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. [2] Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. [3]. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #25086665.

ABSTRACT: We performed a multistage genome-wide association study including 7,683 individuals with pancreatic cancer and 14,397 controls of European descent. Four new loci reached genome-wide significance: rs6971499 at 7q32.3 (LINC-PINT, per-allele odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.74-0.84, P = 3.0 × 10(-12)), rs7190458 at 16q23.1 (BCAR1/CTRB1/CTRB2, OR = 1.46, 95% CI 1.30-1.65, P = 1.1 × 10(-10)), rs9581943 at 13q12.2 (PDX1, OR = 1.15, 95% CI 1.10-1.20, P = 2.4 × 10(-9)) and rs16986825 at 22q12.1 (ZNRF3, OR = 1.18, 95% CI 1.12-1.25, P = 1.2 × 10(-8)). We identified an independent signal in exon 2 of TERT at the established region 5p15.33 (rs2736098, OR = 0.80, 95% CI 0.76-0.85, P = 9.8 × 10(-14)). We also identified a locus at 8q24.21 (rs1561927, P = 1.3 × 10(-7)) that approached genome-wide significance located 455 kb telomeric of PVT1. Our study identified multiple new susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer that are worthy of follow-up studies.

7 Article Polymorphisms in genes related to one-carbon metabolism are not related to pancreatic cancer in PanScan and PanC4. 2013

Leenders, Max / Bhattacharjee, Samsiddhi / Vineis, Paolo / Stevens, Victoria / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Amundadottir, Laufey / Gross, Myron / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Arslan, Alan A / Duell, Eric J / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / Kooperberg, Charles / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria / Risch, Harvey A / Yu, Kai / Wolpin, Brian M / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovanucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman-Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Tjønneland, Anne / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Elena, Joanne W / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, UK. M.Leenders-6@umcutrecht.nl ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #23334854.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The evidence of a relation between folate intake and one-carbon metabolism (OCM) with pancreatic cancer (PanCa) is inconsistent. In this study, the association between genes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) related to OCM and PanCa was assessed. METHODS: Using biochemical knowledge of the OCM pathway, we identified thirty-seven genes and 834 SNPs to examine in association with PanCa. Our study included 1,408 cases and 1,463 controls nested within twelve cohorts (PanScan). The ten SNPs and five genes with lowest p values (<0.02) were followed up in 2,323 cases and 2,340 controls from eight case-control studies (PanC4) that participated in PanScan2. The correlation of SNPs with metabolite levels was assessed for 649 controls from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. RESULTS: When both stages were combined, we observed suggestive associations with PanCa for rs10887710 (MAT1A) (OR 1.13, 95 %CI 1.04-1.23), rs1552462 (SYT9) (OR 1.27, 95 %CI 1.02-1.59), and rs7074891 (CUBN) (OR 1.91, 95 %CI 1.12-3.26). After correcting for multiple comparisons, no significant associations were observed in either the first or second stage. The three suggested SNPs showed no correlations with one-carbon biomarkers. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest genetic study to date to examine the relation between germline variations in OCM-related genes polymorphisms and the risk of PanCa. Suggestive evidence for an association between polymorphisms and PanCa was observed among the cohort-nested studies, but this did not replicate in the case-control studies. Our results do not strongly support the hypothesis that genes related to OCM play a role in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

8 Article Menstrual and reproductive factors in women, genetic variation in CYP17A1, and pancreatic cancer risk in the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition (EPIC) cohort. 2013

Duell, Eric J / Travier, Noémie / Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Dossus, Laure / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise / Tumino, Rosario / Masala, Giovanna / Krogh, Vittorio / Panico, Salvatore / Ricceri, Fulvio / Redondo, Maria Luisa / Dorronsoro, Miren / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José M / Barricarte, Aurelio / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nick J / Allen, Naomi E / Travis, Ruth / Siersema, Peter D / Peeters, Petra H M / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Fragogeorgi, Eirini / Oikonomou, Eleni / Boeing, Heiner / Schuetze, Madlen / Canzian, Federico / Lukanova, Annekatrin / Tjønneland, Anne / Roswall, Nina / Overvad, Kim / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Gram, Inger Torhild / Lund, Eiliv / Lindkvist, Björn / Johansen, Dorthe / Ye, Weimin / Sund, Malin / Fedirko, Veronika / Jenab, Mazda / Michaud, Dominique S / Riboli, Elio / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Catalan Institute of Oncology, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #23015357.

ABSTRACT: Menstrual and reproductive factors and exogenous hormone use have been investigated as pancreatic cancer risk factors in case-control and cohort studies, but results have been inconsistent. We conducted a prospective examination of menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use and pancreatic cancer risk (based on 304 cases) in 328,610 women from the EPIC cohort. Then, in a case-control study nested within the EPIC cohort, we examined 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in CYP17A1 (an essential gene in sex steroid metabolism) for association with pancreatic cancer in women and men (324 cases and 353 controls). Of all factors analyzed, only younger age at menarche (<12 vs. 13 years) was moderately associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer in the full cohort; however, this result was marginally significant (HR = 1.44; 95% CI = 0.99-2.10). CYP17A1 rs619824 was associated with HRT use (p value = 0.037) in control women; however, none of the SNPs alone, in combination, or as haplotypes were associated with pancreatic cancer risk. In conclusion, with the possible exception of an early age of menarche, none of the menstrual and reproductive factors, and none of the 12 common genetic variants we evaluated at the CYP17A1 locus makes a substantial contribution to pancreatic cancer susceptibility in the EPIC cohort.

9 Article Inflammation marker and risk of pancreatic cancer: a nested case-control study within the EPIC cohort. 2012

Grote, V A / Kaaks, R / Nieters, A / Tjønneland, A / Halkjær, J / Overvad, K / Skjelbo Nielsen, M R / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Becker, S / Pischon, T / Boeing, H / Trichopoulou, A / Cassapa, C / Stratigakou, V / Palli, D / Krogh, V / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Panico, S / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Sánchez, M-J / Dorronsoro, M / Navarro, C / Gurrea, A B / Siersema, P D / Peeters, P H M / Ye, W / Sund, M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N / Allen, N E / Travis, R C / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Chuang, S-C / Romaguera, D / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Rohrmann, S. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology (c020), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 581, Heidelberg 69120, Germany. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22617158.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Established risk factors for pancreatic cancer include smoking, long-standing diabetes, high body fatness, and chronic pancreatitis, all of which can be characterised by aspects of inflammatory processes. However, prospective studies investigating the relation between inflammatory markers and pancreatic cancer risk are scarce. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, measuring prediagnostic blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and soluble receptors of tumour necrosis factor-α (sTNF-R1, R2) in 455 pancreatic cancer cases and 455 matched controls. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated using conditional logistic regression models. RESULTS: None of the inflammatory markers were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer overall, although a borderline significant association was observed for higher circulating sTNF-R2 (crude OR=1.52 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.97-2.39), highest vs lowest quartile). In women, however, higher sTNF-R1 levels were significantly associated with risk of pancreatic cancer (crude OR=1.97 (95% CI 1.02-3.79)). For sTNF-R2, risk associations seemed to be stronger for diabetic individuals and those with a higher BMI. CONCLUSION: Prospectively, CRP and IL-6 do not seem to have a role in our study with respect to risk of pancreatic cancer, whereas sTNF-R1 seemed to be a risk factor in women and sTNF-R2 might be a mediator in the risk relationship between overweight and diabetes with pancreatic cancer. Further large prospective studies are needed to clarify the role of proinflammatory proteins and cytokines in the pathogenesis of exocrine pancreatic cancer.

10 Article Pathway analysis of genome-wide association study data highlights pancreatic development genes as susceptibility factors for pancreatic cancer. 2012

Li, Donghui / Duell, Eric J / Yu, Kai / Risch, Harvey A / Olson, Sara H / Kooperberg, Charles / Wolpin, Brian M / Jiao, Li / Dong, Xiaoqun / Wheeler, Bill / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Fuchs, Charles S / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Hartge, Patricia / Hoover, Robert N / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Mandelson, Margaret T / Petersen, Gloria / Zheng, Wei / Agalliu, Ilir / Albanes, Demetrius / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie E / Canzian, Federico / Chang, Kenneth / Chanock, Stephen J / Cotterchio, Michelle / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hoffman Bolton, Judith A / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jacobs, Kevin B / Jenab, Mazda / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Kraft, Peter / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Patel, Alpa V / Rabe, Kari G / Riboli, Elio / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Virtamo, Jarmo / Visvanathan, Kala / Watters, Joanne / Yu, Herbert / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Amundadottir, Laufey / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #22523087.

ABSTRACT: Four loci have been associated with pancreatic cancer through genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Pathway-based analysis of GWAS data is a complementary approach to identify groups of genes or biological pathways enriched with disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) whose individual effect sizes may be too small to be detected by standard single-locus methods. We used the adaptive rank truncated product method in a pathway-based analysis of GWAS data from 3851 pancreatic cancer cases and 3934 control participants pooled from 12 cohort studies and 8 case-control studies (PanScan). We compiled 23 biological pathways hypothesized to be relevant to pancreatic cancer and observed a nominal association between pancreatic cancer and five pathways (P < 0.05), i.e. pancreatic development, Helicobacter pylori lacto/neolacto, hedgehog, Th1/Th2 immune response and apoptosis (P = 2.0 × 10(-6), 1.6 × 10(-5), 0.0019, 0.019 and 0.023, respectively). After excluding previously identified genes from the original GWAS in three pathways (NR5A2, ABO and SHH), the pancreatic development pathway remained significant (P = 8.3 × 10(-5)), whereas the others did not. The most significant genes (P < 0.01) in the five pathways were NR5A2, HNF1A, HNF4G and PDX1 for pancreatic development; ABO for H.pylori lacto/neolacto; SHH for hedgehog; TGFBR2 and CCL18 for Th1/Th2 immune response and MAPK8 and BCL2L11 for apoptosis. Our results provide a link between inherited variation in genes important for pancreatic development and cancer and show that pathway-based approaches to analysis of GWAS data can yield important insights into the collective role of genetic risk variants in cancer.

11 Article A genome-wide association study identifies pancreatic cancer susceptibility loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. 2010

Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey / Fuchs, Charles S / Kraft, Peter / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Jacobs, Kevin B / Arslan, Alan A / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gallinger, Steven / Gross, Myron / Helzlsouer, Kathy / Holly, Elizabeth A / Jacobs, Eric J / Klein, Alison P / LaCroix, Andrea / Li, Donghui / Mandelson, Margaret T / Olson, Sara H / Risch, Harvey A / Zheng, Wei / Albanes, Demetrius / Bamlet, William R / Berg, Christine D / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Buring, Julie E / Bracci, Paige M / Canzian, Federico / Clipp, Sandra / Cotterchio, Michelle / de Andrade, Mariza / Duell, Eric J / Gaziano, J Michael / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Hallmans, Göran / Hankinson, Susan E / Hassan, Manal / Howard, Barbara / Hunter, David J / Hutchinson, Amy / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Kooperberg, Charles / Krogh, Vittorio / Kurtz, Robert C / Lynch, Shannon M / McWilliams, Robert R / Mendelsohn, Julie B / Michaud, Dominique S / Parikh, Hemang / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Rajkovic, Aleksandar / Riboli, Elio / Rodriguez, Laudina / Seminara, Daniela / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Thomas, Gilles / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Van Den Eeden, Stephen K / Virtamo, Jarmo / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wang, Zhaoming / Wolpin, Brian M / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Fraumeni, Joseph F / Hoover, Robert N / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J. ·Department of Health Sciences Research, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #20101243.

ABSTRACT: We conducted a genome-wide association study of pancreatic cancer in 3,851 affected individuals (cases) and 3,934 unaffected controls drawn from 12 prospective cohort studies and 8 case-control studies. Based on a logistic regression model for genotype trend effect that was adjusted for study, age, sex, self-described ancestry and five principal components, we identified eight SNPs that map to three loci on chromosomes 13q22.1, 1q32.1 and 5p15.33. Two correlated SNPs, rs9543325 (P = 3.27 x 10(-11), per-allele odds ratio (OR) 1.26, 95% CI 1.18-1.35) and rs9564966 (P = 5.86 x 10(-8), per-allele OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30), map to a nongenic region on chromosome 13q22.1. Five SNPs on 1q32.1 map to NR5A2, and the strongest signal was at rs3790844 (P = 2.45 x 10(-10), per-allele OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.71-0.84). A single SNP, rs401681 (P = 3.66 x 10(-7), per-allele OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.11-1.27), maps to the CLPTM1L-TERT locus on 5p15.33, which is associated with multiple cancers. Our study has identified common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer that warrant follow-up studies.