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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by So Yeon Kong
Based on 5 articles published since 2010
(Why 5 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, So Yeon Kong wrote the following 5 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Intrapancreatic distal common bile duct carcinoma: Analysis, staging considerations, and comparison with pancreatic ductal and ampullary adenocarcinomas. 2016

Gonzalez, Raul S / Bagci, Pelin / Basturk, Olca / Reid, Michelle D / Balci, Serdar / Knight, Jessica H / Kong, So Yeon / Memis, Bahar / Jang, Kee-Taek / Ohike, Nobuyuki / Tajiri, Takuma / Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna / Krasinskas, Alyssa M / Kim, Grace E / Cheng, Jeanette D / Adsay, N Volkan. ·Department of Pathology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pathology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Tokai University Hachiouji Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #27469329.

ABSTRACT: Distal common bile duct carcinoma is a poorly characterized entity for reasons such as variable terminology and difficulty in determining site of origin of intrapancreatic lesions. We compared clinicopathologic features of pancreatobiliary-type adenocarcinomas within the pancreas, but arising from the distal common bile duct, with those of pancreatic and ampullary origin. Upon careful review of 1017 pancreatoduodenectomy specimens with primary adenocarcinoma, 52 (5%) qualified as intrapancreatic distal common bile duct carcinoma. Five associated with an intraductal papillary neoplasm were excluded; the remaining 47 were compared to 109 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas and 133 ampullary carcinomas. Distal common bile duct carcinoma patients had a younger median age (58 years) than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients (65 years) and ampullary carcinoma patients (68 years). Distal common bile duct carcinoma was intermediate between pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and ampullary carcinoma with regard to tumor size and rates of node metastases and margin positivity. Median survival was better than for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (P=0.0010) but worse than for ampullary carcinoma (P=0.0006). Distal common bile duct carcinoma often formed an even band around the common bile duct and commonly showed intraglandular neutrophil-rich debris and a small tubular pattern. Poor prognostic indicators included node metastasis (P=0.0010), lymphovascular invasion (P=0.0299), and margin positivity (P=0.0069). Categorizing the tumors based on size also had prognostic relevance (P=0.0096), unlike categorization based on anatomic structures invaded. Primary distal common bile duct carcinoma is seen in younger patients than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma or ampullary carcinoma. Its prognosis is significantly better than pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and worse than ampullary carcinoma, at least partly because of differences in clinical presentation. Use of size-based criteria for staging appears to improve its prognostic relevance. Invasive pancreatobiliary-type distal common bile duct carcinomas are uncommon in the West and have substantial clinicopathologic differences from carcinomas arising from the pancreas and ampulla.

2 Article Calculation of the Ki67 index in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a comparative analysis of four counting methodologies. 2015

Reid, Michelle D / Bagci, Pelin / Ohike, Nobuyuki / Saka, Burcu / Erbarut Seven, Ipek / Dursun, Nevra / Balci, Serdar / Gucer, Hasan / Jang, Kee-Taek / Tajiri, Takuma / Basturk, Olca / Kong, So Yeon / Goodman, Michael / Akkas, Gizem / Adsay, Volkan. ·Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Marmara University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Pathology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Medipol University, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Pathology, Istanbul Education and Training Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. · Department of Pathology, Yildirim Beyazit University, Ankara, Turkey. · Department of Pathology, RTE University, Rize, Turkey. · Department of Pathology, Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pathology, Tokai University Hachiouji Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, Department of Epidemiology, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA. ·Mod Pathol · Pubmed #25412850.

ABSTRACT: Ki67 index is now an essential part of classification of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. However, its adaptation into daily practice has been fraught with challenges related to counting methodology. In this study, three reviewers used four counting methodologies to calculate Ki67 index in 68 well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: (1) 'eye-ball' estimation, which has been advocated as reliable and is widely used; (2) automated counting by image analyzer; (3) manual eye-counting (eye under a microscope without a grid); and (4) manual count of camera-captured/printed image. Pearson's correlation (R) was used to measure pair-wise correlation among three reviewers using all four methodologies. Average level of agreement was calculated using mean of R values. The results showed that: (1) 'eye-balling' was least expensive and fastest (average time <1 min) but had poor reliability and reproducibility. (2) Automated count was the most expensive and least practical with major impact on turnaround time (limited by machine and personnel accessibility), and, more importantly, had inaccuracies in overcounting unwanted material. (3) Manual eye count had no additional cost, averaged 6 min, but proved impractical and poorly reproducible. (4) Camera-captured/printed image was most reliable, had highest reproducibility, but took longer than 'eye-balling'. In conclusion, based on its comparatively low cost/benefit ratio and reproducibility, camera-captured/printed image appears to be the most practical for calculating Ki67 index. Although automated counting is generally advertised as the gold standard for index calculation, in this study it was not as accurate or cost-effective as camera-captured/printed image and was highly operator-dependent. 'Eye-balling' produces highly inaccurate and unreliable results, and is not recommended for routine use.

3 Article Leukocyte telomere length in relation to pancreatic cancer risk: a prospective study. 2014

Campa, Daniele / Mergarten, Björn / De Vivo, Immaculata / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Racine, Antoine / Severi, Gianluca / Nieters, Alexandra / Katzke, Verena A / Trichopoulou, Antonia / Yiannakouris, Nikos / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Boeing, Heiner / Quirós, J Ramón / Duell, Eric J / Molina-Montes, Esther / Huerta, José María / Ardanaz, Eva / Dorronsoro, Miren / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Wareham, Nicholas / Travis, Ruth C / Palli, Domenico / Pala, Valeria / Tumino, Rosario / Naccarati, Alessio / Panico, Salvatore / Vineis, Paolo / Riboli, Elio / Siddiq, Afshan / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Peeters, Petra H / Nilsson, Peter M / Sund, Malin / Ye, Weimin / Lund, Eiliv / Jareid, Mie / Weiderpass, Elisabete / Duarte-Salles, Talita / Kong, So Yeon / Stepien, Magdalena / Canzian, Federico / Kaaks, Rudolf. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Program in Genetic Epidemiology and Statistical Genetics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones, and Women's Health team, Villejuif, France. Univ Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, Villejuif, France. IGR, Villejuif, France. · Human Genetics Foundation (HuGeF), Torino, Italy. · Center for Chronic Immunodeficiency, University Medical Center Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Harokopio University of Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts. · Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany. · Public Health Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · Unit of Nutrition, Environment, and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Escuela Andaluza de Salud Pública, Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria de Granada (Granada.ibs), Granada, Spain. CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Department of Epidemiology, Murcia Regional Health Council, Murcia, Spain. · CIBER Epidemiology and Public Health CIBERESP, Madrid, Spain. Navarre Public Health Institute, Pamplona, Spain. · Public Health Direction and Biodonostia-Ciberesp Basque Regional Health Department, San Sebastian, Spain. · University of Cambridge, School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Molecular and Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Research and Prevention Institute, ISPO, Florence, Italy. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Cancer Registry and Histopathology Unit, "Civic - M.P. Arezzo" Hospital, ASP Ragusa, Ragusa, Italy. · Dipartimento Di Medicina Clinica e Chirurgia Federico II University, Naples, Italy. · Division of Epidemiology, Public Health and Primary Care, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Genomics of Common Disease, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, the Netherlands. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, the Netherlands. The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center, Utrecht, the Netherlands. · Lund University, Department of Clinical Sciences, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö Sweden. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. The Medical Biobank at Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. · Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromso, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway. Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-WHO), Lyon, France. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. r.kaaks@dkfz.de. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #25103821.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Several studies have examined leukocyte telomere length (LTL) as a possible predictor for cancer at various organ sites. The hypothesis originally motivating many of these studies was that shorter telomeres would be associated with an increase in cancer risk; the results of epidemiologic studies have been inconsistent, however, and suggested positive, negative, or null associations. Two studies have addressed the association of LTL in relation to pancreatic cancer risk and the results are contrasting. METHODS: We measured LTL in a prospective study of 331 pancreatic cancer cases and 331 controls in the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). RESULTS: We observed that the mean LTL was higher in cases (0.59 ± 0.20) than in controls (0.57 ± 0.17), although this difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.07), and a basic logistic regression model showed no association of LTL with pancreas cancer risk. When adjusting for levels of HbA1c and C-peptide, however, there was a weakly positive association between longer LTL and pancreatic cancer risk [OR, 1.13; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.01-1.27]. Additional analyses by cubic spline regression suggested a possible nonlinear relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk (P = 0.022), with a statistically nonsignificant increase in risk at very low LTL, as well as a significant increase at high LTL. CONCLUSION: Taken together, the results from our study do not support LTL as a uniform and strong predictor of pancreatic cancer. IMPACT: The results of this article can provide insights into telomere dynamics and highlight the complex relationship between LTL and pancreatic cancer risk.

4 Article Mucinous carcinomas of the gallbladder: clinicopathologic analysis of 15 cases identified in 606 carcinomas. 2012

Dursun, Nevra / Escalona, Oscar Tapia / Roa, Juan Carlos / Basturk, Olca / Bagci, Pelin / Cakir, Asli / Cheng, Jeanette / Sarmiento, Juan / Losada, Hector / Kong, So Yeon / Ducato, Leslie / Goodman, Michael / Adsay, N Volkan. ·Department of Pathology, Istanbul Education and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. ·Arch Pathol Lab Med · Pubmed #23106580.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: There are virtually no data in the literature regarding the incidence, patterns, and clinicopathologic characteristics of mucinous carcinomas (MCs) of the gallbladder (GB). OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence of mucinous differentiation in invasive GB carcinomas and the clinicopathologic characteristics of those that qualify as MC. DESIGN: Primary invasive GB carcinomas (n  =  606) were reviewed for mucinous differentiation. Some degree of mucin production was identified in 40 cases (6.6%); however, only 15 (2.5%) were qualified for the World Health Organization definition of MC (stromal mucin deposition constituting >50% of the tumor). RESULTS: The mean age was 65 years, and the female to male ratio was 1.1 (versus 3.9 for conventional pancreatobiliary-type GB adenocarcinomas; P  =  .04). A significant proportion of the cases (8 of 12, 67%) presented with the clinical picture and intraoperative findings that were interpreted as acute cholecystitis. Mean and median tumor sizes were larger than those of conventional adenocarcinomas (4.8 and 3.4 cm versus 2.9 and 2.5 cm, respectively; P  =  .01). Most (13 of 15, 87%) cases presented with pT3 tumors (versus 48% for ordinary GB carcinomas; P  =  .01). Two cases had almost an exclusive colloid pattern (>90% composed of well-defined stromal mucin nodules that contained scanty carcinoma cells, most of which were floating within the mucin). Eight cases were of mixed-mucinous type, showing a mixture of colloid and noncolloid patterns. Five others had prominent signet-ring cells, both floating within the mucin (which constituted >50% of the tumor by definition) and infiltrating into the stroma as individual signet-ring cells in some areas. Immunohistochemical analysis performed on the 7 cases that had available tissue revealed CK7 in 4 of 7 (57%), CK20 in 2 of 7 (29%), MUC1 in 4 of 7 (57%), MUC2 in 6 of 7 (86%), CDX2 in 1 of 7 (14%), MUC5AC in 6 of 7 (86%), MUC6 in 0 of 7 (0%), and loss of E-cadherin in 6 of 7 (86%). The MLH1 and MSH2 were retained in 6 of 7 cases (100%). Follow-up information was available for 13 cases: 11 (85%) died of disease (1-37 months) and 2 (15%) were alive (23 months and 1 month). Overall survival of MCs was significantly worse than that of conventional adenocarcinomas (13 versus 26 months; P  =  .01); however, that did not seem to be independent of stage. CONCLUSIONS: Mucinous carcinomas constitute 2.5% of GB carcinomas. They present with an acute cholecystitis-type picture. Most MCs are a mixed-mucinous, not pure colloid, type. They are typically large and advanced tumors at the time of diagnosis and thus exhibit more-aggressive behavior than do ordinary GB carcinomas. Immunophenotypically, they differ from conventional GB adenocarcinomas by MUC2 positivity, from intestinal carcinomas by an often inverse CK7/20 profile, from pancreatic mucinous carcinomas by CDX2 negativity, and from mammary colloid carcinomas by a lack of MUC6. Unlike gastrointestinal MCs, they appear to be microsatellite stable.

5 Article Ampullary region carcinomas: definition and site specific classification with delineation of four clinicopathologically and prognostically distinct subsets in an analysis of 249 cases. 2012

Adsay, Volkan / Ohike, Nobuyuki / Tajiri, Takuma / Kim, Grace E / Krasinskas, Alyssa / Balci, Serdar / Bagci, Pelin / Basturk, Olca / Bandyopadhyay, Sudeshna / Jang, Kee-Taek / Kooby, David A / Maithel, Shishir K / Sarmiento, Juan / Staley, Charles A / Gonzalez, Raul S / Kong, So Yeon / Goodman, Michael. ·Department of Pathology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. volkan.adsay@emory.edu ·Am J Surg Pathol · Pubmed #23026934.

ABSTRACT: Ampullary (AMP) carcinomas comprise a heterogeneous group of cancers lacking adequate subcategorization. In the present study, 249 strictly defined primary AMP carcinomas (ACs) identified in 1469 malignant pancreatoduodenectomy specimens were analyzed for defining features. Gross and microscopic findings were used to determine tumor epicenter and extent of preinvasive component. ACs were classified into 4 distinct subtypes based on location: (1) Intra-AMP (25%): Invasive carcinomas arising in intra-ampullary papillary-tubular neoplasms with zero to minimal, duodenal surface involvement (<25% of the tumor). These tumors were more commonly found in men, they had a relatively large overall size (mean, 2.9 cm) but had smaller invasive component (mean, 1.5 cm), and were predominantly of a lower TNM stage (85%, T1/2; and 72% N0). They carried the best prognosis among the 4 groups (3-y survival, 73%). (2) AMP-ductal (15%): These were tumors forming constrictive, sclerotic, plaque-like thickening of the walls of the common bile duct and/or pancreatic duct resulting in mucosa-covered, button-like elevations of the papilla into the duodenal lumen. There was no significant exophytic (preinvasive) growth. These were the smallest tumors (mean overall size, 1.9 cm; mean invasion size 1.7 cm), but carried the worst prognosis (3-y survival, 41%), presumably due to the pancreatobiliary histology/origin (in 86%); however, even this group had significantly better prognosis when compared with 113 ordinary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (3 y, 11%; P<0.0001). (3) Peri-AMP-duodenal (5%): Massive exophytic, ulcero-fungating tumors growing into the duodenal lumen and eccentrically encasing the ampullary orifice with only minimal intra-ampullary luminal involvement. These were mostly of intestinal phenotype (75%) and some had mucinous features. Although these tumors were the largest (mean overall size 4.7 cm; and mean invasion size 3.4 cm), and had the highest incidence of lymph node metastasis (50%), they carried an intermediate prognosis (3-y survival, 69%) to that seen among a group of 55 nonampullary duodenal carcinoma controls. (4) AC-not otherwise specified ("papilla of Vater"; 55%): Ulcero-nodular tumors located at the papilla of Vater, which do not show the specific characteristics identified among the other 3 subtypes. In conclusion, ACs comprise 4 clinicopathologic subtypes that are prognostically distinct.