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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Andrew Kneebone
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, A. Kneebone wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Impact of gemcitabine chemotherapy and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy/5-fluorouracil on quality of life of patients managed for pancreatic cancer. 2013

Short, Michala / Goldstein, David / Halkett, Georgia / Reece, William / Borg, Martin / Zissiadis, Yvonne / Kneebone, Andrew / Spry, Nigel. ·Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, University of Sydney, and Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #22543205.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To report quality of life (QOL) results for patients receiving chemoradiation therapy for pancreatic cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Eligible patients (n=41 locally advanced, n=22 postsurgery) entered the B9E-AY-S168 study and received 1 cycle of induction gemcitabine (1000 mg/m2 weekly ×3 with 1-week break) followed by 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) (54 Gy locally advanced and 45 Gy postsurgery) and concomitant continuous-infusion 5-fluorouracil (5FU) (200 mg/m2/d throughout RT). After 4 weeks, patients received an additional 3 cycles of consolidation gemcitabine chemotherapy. Patients completed the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-PAN26 questionnaires at baseline, before RT/5FU, at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion. RESULTS: The patterns of change in global QOL scores differed between groups. In the locally advanced group global QOL scores were +13, +8, +3, and +1 compared with baseline before RT/5FU (P=.008), at end of RT/5FU, before consolidation gemcitabine, and at treatment completion, respectively. In the postsurgery group, global QOL scores were -3, +4, +15, and +17 compared with baseline at the same time points, with a significant improvement in global QOL before consolidation gemcitabine (P=.03). No significant declines in global QOL were reported by either cohort. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that global QOL and associated function and symptom profiles for pancreatic chemoradiation therapy differ between locally advanced and postsurgery patients, likely owing to differences in underlying disease status. For both groups, the treatment protocol was well tolerated and did not have a negative impact on patients' global QOL.

2 Article Retrospective cohort analysis of neoadjuvant treatment and survival in resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a high volume referral centre. 2017

Itchins, M / Arena, J / Nahm, C B / Rabindran, J / Kim, S / Gibbs, E / Bergamin, S / Chua, T C / Gill, A J / Maher, R / Diakos, C / Wong, M / Mittal, A / Hruby, G / Kneebone, A / Pavlakis, N / Samra, J / Clarke, S. ·Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: mitchins@gmail.com. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Upper GI Surgical Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. · Upper GI Surgical Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trial Centre (NHMRC CTC), The University of Sydney, Australia. · Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia; Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology, Kolling Institute, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Radiology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia; Northern Cancer Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gosford Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28688722.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly disease. Neoadjuvant therapy (NA) with chemotherapy (NAC) and radiotherapy (RT) prior to surgery provides promise. In the absence of prospective data, well annotated clinical data from high-volume units may provide pilot data for randomised trials. METHODS: Medical records from a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, were analysed to identify all patients with resectable or borderline resectable PDAC. Data regarding treatment, toxicity and survival were collected. RESULTS: Between January 1 2010 and April 1 2016, 220 sequential patients were treated: 87 with NA and 133 with upfront operation (UO). Forty-three NA patients (52%) and 5 UO patients (4%) were borderline resectable at diagnosis. Twenty-four borderline patients received NA RT, 22 sequential to NAC. The median overall survival (OS) in the NA group was 25.9 months (mo); 95% CI (21.1-43.0 mo) compared to 26.9 mo (19.7, 32.7) in the UO; HR 0.89; log-ranked p-value = 0.58. Sixty-nine NA patients (79%) were resected, mOS was 29.2 mo (22.27, not reached (NR)). Twenty-two NA (31%) versus 22 UO (17%) were node negative at operation (N0). In those managed with NAC/RT the mOS was 29.0 mo (17.3, NR). There were no post-operative deaths with NA within 90-days and three in the UO arm. DISCUSSION: This is a hypothesis generating retrospective review of a selected real-world population in a high-throughput unit. Treatment with NA was well tolerated. The long observed survival in this group may be explained by lymph node sterilisation by NA, and the achievement of R0 resection in a greater proportion of patients.