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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by S. Kim
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S. Kim wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Clinicopathological features and outcome of type 3 gastric neuroendocrine tumours. 2018

Min, B-H / Hong, M / Lee, J H / Rhee, P-L / Sohn, T S / Kim, S / Kim, K-M / Kim, J J. ·Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pathology and Translational Genomics, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Pathology, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Department of Surgery, Samsung Medical Centre, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #29893418.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: With the widespread use of endoscopy, small and low-grade type 3 gastric neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are increasingly being detected. The clinicopathological features, biological behaviour and appropriate treatment strategy for these NETs remain unclear. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven gastric NET and a normal fasting serum gastrin level were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Clinicopathological features and long-term outcome of local resection for type 3 NETs were reviewed retrospectively and compared according to tumour grade. RESULTS: Some 32 patients with type 3 gastric NETs were included (25 patients with NET grade G1, 5 with G2 and 2 with G3). Pathological tumour size was 2·0 cm or less in 30 patients. All tumours were well differentiated, even G3 lesions, and all tumours but one were confined to the submucosal layer. G1 NETs were significantly smaller and had a significantly lower lymphovascular invasion rate than G2 and G3 NETs. Twenty-two patients with a G1 NET without lymphovascular invasion were treated with wedge or endoscopic resection. After a median follow-up of 59 (range 6-102) months, no patient with a G1 NET of 1·5 cm or smaller developed recurrence and one patient with a G1 NET larger than 1·5 cm had recurrence in a perigastric lymph node. Among seven patients with a G2 or G3 NET, two had lymph node metastasis and one had liver metastases. CONCLUSION: Low-grade type 3 gastric NET has non-aggressive features and a favourable prognosis. Wedge or endoscopic resection may be a valid option for patients with type 3 gastric G1 NET no larger than 1·5 cm without lymphovascular invasion.

2 Article Retrospective cohort analysis of neoadjuvant treatment and survival in resectable and borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in a high volume referral centre. 2017

Itchins, M / Arena, J / Nahm, C B / Rabindran, J / Kim, S / Gibbs, E / Bergamin, S / Chua, T C / Gill, A J / Maher, R / Diakos, C / Wong, M / Mittal, A / Hruby, G / Kneebone, A / Pavlakis, N / Samra, J / Clarke, S. ·Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: mitchins@gmail.com. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Upper GI Surgical Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. · Upper GI Surgical Unit, Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trial Centre (NHMRC CTC), The University of Sydney, Australia. · Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia; Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology, Kolling Institute, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Radiology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia; Northern Cancer Institute, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Gosford Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Sydney Medical School (Northern), The University of Sydney, Australia. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28688722.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a deadly disease. Neoadjuvant therapy (NA) with chemotherapy (NAC) and radiotherapy (RT) prior to surgery provides promise. In the absence of prospective data, well annotated clinical data from high-volume units may provide pilot data for randomised trials. METHODS: Medical records from a tertiary hospital in Sydney, Australia, were analysed to identify all patients with resectable or borderline resectable PDAC. Data regarding treatment, toxicity and survival were collected. RESULTS: Between January 1 2010 and April 1 2016, 220 sequential patients were treated: 87 with NA and 133 with upfront operation (UO). Forty-three NA patients (52%) and 5 UO patients (4%) were borderline resectable at diagnosis. Twenty-four borderline patients received NA RT, 22 sequential to NAC. The median overall survival (OS) in the NA group was 25.9 months (mo); 95% CI (21.1-43.0 mo) compared to 26.9 mo (19.7, 32.7) in the UO; HR 0.89; log-ranked p-value = 0.58. Sixty-nine NA patients (79%) were resected, mOS was 29.2 mo (22.27, not reached (NR)). Twenty-two NA (31%) versus 22 UO (17%) were node negative at operation (N0). In those managed with NAC/RT the mOS was 29.0 mo (17.3, NR). There were no post-operative deaths with NA within 90-days and three in the UO arm. DISCUSSION: This is a hypothesis generating retrospective review of a selected real-world population in a high-throughput unit. Treatment with NA was well tolerated. The long observed survival in this group may be explained by lymph node sterilisation by NA, and the achievement of R0 resection in a greater proportion of patients.

3 Article HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and exhibits pro-oncogenic activity in pancreatic cancer. 2013

Kim, K / Jutooru, I / Chadalapaka, G / Johnson, G / Frank, J / Burghardt, R / Kim, S / Safe, S. ·Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston, TX, USA. ·Oncogene · Pubmed #22614017.

ABSTRACT: HOTAIR is a long intervening non-coding RNA (lincRNA) that associates with the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) and overexpression is correlated with poor survival for breast, colon and liver cancer patients. In this study, we show that HOTAIR expression is increased in pancreatic tumors compared with non-tumor tissue and is associated with more aggressive tumors. Knockdown of HOTAIR (siHOTAIR) by RNA interference shows that HOTAIR has an important role in pancreatic cancer cell invasion, as reported in other cancer cell lines. In contrast, HOTAIR knockdown in Panc1 and L3.6pL pancreatic cancer cells that overexpress this lincRNA decreased cell proliferation, altered cell cycle progression and induced apoptosis, demonstrating an expanded function of HOTAIR in pancreatic cancer cells compared with other cancer cell lines. Results of gene array studies showed that there was minimal overlap between HOTAIR-regulated genes in pancreatic cells and breast cancer cells, and HOTAIR uniquely suppressed several interferon-related genes and gene sets related to cell cycle progression in pancreatic cancer cells and tumors. Analysis of selected genes suppressed by HOTAIR in Panc1 and L3.6pL cells showed by knockdown of EZH2 and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays that HOTAIR-mediated gene repression was both PRC2-dependent and -independent. HOTAIR knockdown in L3.6pL cells inhibited tumor growth in mouse xenograft model, further demonstrating the pro-oncogenic function of HOTAIR in pancreatic cancer.