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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Zaheer S. Kanji
Based on 7 articles published since 2009
(Why 7 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Z. Kanji wrote the following 7 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer. 2013

Kanji, Zaheer S / Gallinger, Steven. · ·CMAJ · Pubmed #23610017.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Article Minimally invasive versus open distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis from the U.S. neuroendocrine tumor study group. 2019

Zhang, Xu-Feng / Lopez-Aguiar, Alexandra G / Poultsides, George / Makris, Eleftherios / Rocha, Flavio / Kanji, Zaheer / Weber, Sharon / Fields, Ryan / Krasnick, Bradley A / Idrees, Kamran / Smith, Paula M / Cho, Cliff / Schmidt, Carl R / Maithel, Shishir K / Pawlik, Timothy M / Anonymous1951618. ·Department of Hepatobiliary Surgery and Institute of Advanced Surgical Technology and Engineering, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, China. · Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and James Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin. · Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Wisconsin. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. · Division of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Advanced Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #31001868.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To determine short- and long-term oncologic outcomes after minimally invasive distal pancreatectomy (MIDP) with open distal pancreatectomy (ODP) for the treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (pNET). METHODS: The data of the patients who underwent curative MIDP or ODP for pNET between 2000 and 2016 were collected from a multi-institutional database. Propensity score matching (PSM) was used to generate 1:1 matched patients with MIDP and ODP. RESULTS: A total of 576 patients undergoing curative DP for pNET were included. Two hundred and fourteen (37.2%) patients underwent MIDP, whereas 362 (62.8%) underwent ODP. MIDP was increasingly performed over time (2000-2004: 9.3% vs 2013-2016: 54.8%; P < 0.01). In the matched cohort (n = 141 in each group), patients who underwent MIDP had less blood loss (median, 100 vs 200 mL, P < 0.001), lower incidence of Clavien-Dindo ≥ III complications (12.1% vs 24.8%, P = 0.026), and a shorter hospital stay versus ODP (median, 4 versus 7 days, P = 0.026). Patients who underwent MIDP had a lower incidence of recurrence (5-year cumulative recurrence, 10.1% vs 31.1%, P < 0.001), yet equivalent overall survival (OS) rate (5-year OS, 92.1% vs 90.9%, P = 0.550) compared with patients who underwent OPD. CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing MIDP over ODP in the treatment of pNET had comparable oncologic surgical metrics, as well as similar long-term OS.

3 Article Nomogram predicting the risk of recurrence after curative-intent resection of primary non-metastatic gastrointestinal neuroendocrine tumors: An analysis of the U.S. Neuroendocrine Tumor Study Group. 2018

Merath, Katiuscha / Bagante, Fabio / Beal, Eliza W / Lopez-Aguiar, Alexandra G / Poultsides, George / Makris, Eleftherios / Rocha, Flavio / Kanji, Zaheer / Weber, Sharon / Fisher, Alexander / Fields, Ryan / Krasnick, Bradley A / Idrees, Kamran / Smith, Paula M / Cho, Cliff / Beems, Megan / Schmidt, Carl R / Dillhoff, Mary / Maithel, Shishir K / Pawlik, Timothy M. ·Division of Surgical Oncology, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and James Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio. · Department of Surgery, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. · Department of Surgery, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California. · Department of Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, Washington. · Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin. · Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Wisconsin. · Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. · Division of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Advanced Gastrointestinal Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Wisconsin. ·J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29448303.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The risk of recurrence after resection of non-metastatic gastro-entero-pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NET) is poorly defined. We developed/validated a nomogram to predict risk of recurrence after curative-intent resection. METHODS: A training set to develop the nomogram and test set for validation were identified. The predictive ability of the nomogram was assessed using c-indices. RESULTS: Among 1477 patients, 673 (46%) were included in the training set and 804 (54%) in y the test set. On multivariable analysis, Ki-67, tumor size, nodal status, and invasion of adjacent organs were independent predictors of DFS. The risk of death increased by 8% for each percentage increase in the Ki-67 index (HR 1.08, 95% CI, 1.05-1.10; P < 0.001). GEP-NET invading adjacent organs had a HR of 1.65 (95% CI, 1.03-2.65; P = 0.038), similar to tumors ≥3 cm (HR 1.67, 95% CI, 1.11-2.51; P = 0.014). Patients with 1-3 positive nodes and patients with >3 positive nodes had a HR of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.12-2.87; P = 0.014) and 2.51 (95% CI, 1.50-4.24; P < 0.001), respectively. The nomogram demonstrated good ability to predict risk of recurrence (c-index: training set, 0.739; test set, 0.718). CONCLUSION: The nomogram was able to predict the risk of recurrence and can be easily applied in the clinical setting.

4 Article Gemcitabine and Taxane Adjuvant Therapy with Chemoradiation in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Novel Strategy for Improved Survival? 2018

Kanji, Zaheer S / Edwards, Alicia M / Mandelson, Margaret T / Sahar, Nadav / Lin, Bruce S / Badiozamani, Kasra / Song, Guobin / Alseidi, Adnan / Biehl, Thomas R / Kozarek, Richard A / Helton, William S / Picozzi, Vincent J / Rocha, Flavio G. ·Digestive Disease Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Section of General Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Cancer Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Section of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Digestive Disease Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. flavio.rocha@virginiamason.org. · Cancer Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. flavio.rocha@virginiamason.org. · Section of General Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. flavio.rocha@virginiamason.org. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #29344878.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine-taxane combination chemotherapy has demonstrated a survival benefit clinically in metastatic pancreatic cancer (PC). The authors present their experience with gemcitabine and docetaxel (gem/tax)-based adjuvant treatment (Rx) after surgery with curative intent. METHODS: Patients with de novo resectable PC from January 2010 to December 2015 were identified from the authors' institutional database and registry. The study included only patients who received gem/tax as their initial Rx administered exclusively at the authors' institution with or without chemoradiation (CRTx). Survival analysis was performed using Kaplan-Meier methods, and prognostic factors were investigated by Cox proportional hazard modeling. RESULTS: Of 102 patients identified, 58 met the study criteria. The median age at diagnosis was 65 years, with 55% of the patients undergoing an R1 resection (margin ≤ 1 mm). Tumor characteristics included a median tumor size of 28 mm, a poor differentiation rate of 54%, and a lymph node positivity of 67%. Most of the patients (90%, 52/58) completed 80% or more of the 24 week Rx. Of these patients, 71% received post-gem/tax CRTx Rx. Grade 3 or 4 toxicity was observed in 52% of the patients. The median follow-up period was 51.2 months, and the observed median overall survival (OS) was 52 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 27.4-not reached]. The actuarial 5-year OS was 49% (95% CI 33.7-63.4%). In the multivariate analysis, an R1 resection and American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) stage 2 versus stage 1 disease were negatively associated with OS, whereas administration of CRTx was positively associated with OS. CONCLUSIONS: Adjuvant gem/tax with or without CRTx is feasible, with a favorable OS. Future prospective studies of gem/taxane-based adjuvant Rx for PC are warranted.

5 Article New guidelines for use of endoscopic ultrasound for evaluation and risk stratification of pancreatic cystic lesions may be too conservative. 2018

Sahar, Nadav / Razzak, Anthony / Kanji, Zaheer S / Coy, David L / Kozarek, Richard / Ross, Andrew S / Gluck, Michael / Larsen, Michael / Irani, Shayan / Gan, S Ian. ·Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, 1100 Ninth Avenue, C3-GAS, Seattle, WA, 98101, USA. · Department of Radiology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, 1100 Ninth Avenue, C3-GAS, Seattle, WA, 98101, USA. seng-ian.gan@virginiamason.org. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #29288277.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The role of EUS in managing asymptomatic pancreatic cystic lesions (PCLs) remains unresolved. We retrospectively evaluated EUS in risk stratification of PCLs when adhering to the most recent AGA guidelines. METHODS: Asymptomatic PCLs that were evaluated by EUS from January 2014 to December 2014 were retrospectively reviewed including associated cytology, fluid analysis, and relevant surgical pathology. Cross-sectional imaging reports were reviewed blindly by an expert radiologist using AGA risk stratification terminology. Accepted imaging high-risk features (HRF) included cyst diameter > 3 cm, dilated upstream pancreatic ducts, and a solid component in the cyst. RESULTS: We reviewed 125 patients who underwent EUS. Expert review of cross-sectional imaging resulted in a different interpretation 25% of the time including 1 malignant cyst. Ninety-three patients (75%) had no HRFs on cross-sectional imaging; 28 patients (22%) were diagnosed with 1 HRF and 4 patients (3%) had 2 HRFs. Adhering to AGA guidelines using 2 HRF as threshold for use of EUS, the diagnosis of malignant and high-risk premalignant lesions (including pancreatic adenocarcinoma, mucinous cystadenoma, neuroendocrine tumors, and IPMN with dysplasia) had a 40% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Had EUS been utilized based on a threshold of 1 HRF on imaging, malignant and high-risk premalignant lesions would have been identified with 80% sensitivity and 95% specificity. By adding EUS to radiographic imaging, the specificity for detecting carcinomas (p = 0.0009) and detection of all premalignant lesions (p = 0.003) statistically improved. Furthermore, EUS allowed 14 patients (11%) to avoid further surveillance by lowering their risk stratification. CONCLUSION: EUS remains an essential risk stratification modality for incidental PCLs. Current guideline suggestions of its utility may be too stringent. Our study justifies expert radiology review when managing PCLs. Further studies are required to identify the optimal approach to PCL management.

6 Article Overall survival and clinical characteristics of pancreatic cancer in BRCA mutation carriers. 2014

Golan, T / Kanji, Z S / Epelbaum, R / Devaud, N / Dagan, E / Holter, S / Aderka, D / Paluch-Shimon, S / Kaufman, B / Gershoni-Baruch, R / Hedley, D / Moore, M J / Friedman, E / Gallinger, S. ·1] The Oncology Institute the Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel [2] The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel. · 1] Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada [2] Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute of Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 1] Department of Oncology, Rambam Health Care Campus, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel [2] Technion, Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel. · 1] Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel [2] Institute of Human Genetics, Rambam Health Care Campus, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. · 1] Technion, Faculty of Medicine, Haifa, Israel [2] Institute of Human Genetics, Rambam Health Care Campus, University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada. · 1] The Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel [2] The Susanne Levy Gertner Oncogenetics Unit Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #25072261.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The BRCA1/2 proteins are involved in regulation of cellular proliferation by DNA damage repair via homologous recombination. Therefore, BRCA1/2 mutation carriers with pancreatic cancer may have distinct biologic outcomes. METHODS: Patients with BRCA1/2-associated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) diagnosed between January 1994 and December 2012 were identified from databases at three participating institutions. Clinical data were collected. Disease-free survival and overall survival (OS) were analysed. RESULTS: Overall, 71 patients with PDAC and BRCA1 (n=21), BRCA2 (n=49) or both (n=1) mutations were identified. Mean age at diagnosis was 60.3 years (range 33-83), 81.7% (n=58) had any family history of malignancy; 30% (n=21) underwent primary resection. Out of 71 participants, 12 received experimental therapy; one patient had missing data, these 13 cases were excluded from OS analysis. Median OS for 58 patients was 14 months (95% CI 10-23 months). Median OS for patients with stage 1/2 disease has not been reached with 52% still alive at 60 months. Median OS for stage 3/4 was 12 months (95% CI 6-15). Superior OS was observed for patients with stage 3/4 treated with platinum vs those treated with non-platinum chemotherapies (22 vs 9 months; P=0.039). CONCLUSION: Superior OS was observed for advanced-disease BRCA-associated PDAC with platinum exposure.

7 Article Exome sequencing identifies nonsegregating nonsense ATM and PALB2 variants in familial pancreatic cancer. 2013

Grant, Robert C / Al-Sukhni, Wigdan / Borgida, Ayelet E / Holter, Spring / Kanji, Zaheer S / McPherson, Treasa / Whelan, Emily / Serra, Stefano / Trinh, Quang M / Peltekova, Vanya / Stein, Lincoln D / McPherson, John D / Gallinger, Steven. ·Samuel Lunenfeld Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, M5G 1X5, Canada. ·Hum Genomics · Pubmed #23561644.

ABSTRACT: We sequenced 11 germline exomes from five families with familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). One proband had a germline nonsense variant in ATM with somatic loss of the variant allele. Another proband had a nonsense variant in PALB2 with somatic loss of the variant allele. Both variants were absent in a relative with FPC. These findings question the causal mechanisms of ATM and PALB2 in these families and highlight challenges in identifying the causes of familial cancer syndromes using exome sequencing.