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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Daniel Kaemmerer
Based on 15 articles published since 2009
(Why 15 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, D. Kaemmerer wrote the following 15 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pathology and Surgical Treatment of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: an Evolving Landscape. 2016

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Kaemmerer, Daniel / Gaujoux, Sebastien / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Verbeke, Caroline Sophie / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Postbox 4950, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Postbox 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Postbox 800, 3004, Drammen, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Robert-Koch-Allee 9, Bad Berka, 99437, Germany. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, Cochin Hospital, APHP, Université Paris Descartes, 27, rue du Faubourg Saint Jacques, 74014, Paris, France. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Postbox 4950, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Postbox 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Postbox 4956, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. ·Curr Oncol Rep · Pubmed #26984415.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare, accounting for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors. High-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (hgPNECs) represent about 5% of all PNENs. They show highly aggressive behavior with dismal prognosis. Throughout the last two decades, there has been a notable progress in basic and clinical research of PNENs and a therapeutic trend towards both more aggressive and minimally invasive surgery. Despite these advances, hgPNECs as a distinct clinical entity remains largely unexplored among surgeons. This review of current development in pathology reporting and surgical treatment of hgPNECs aims at increasing the awareness of an evolving field in pancreatic surgery.

2 Review Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2012

Hörsch, D / Bert, T / Schrader, J / Hommann, M / Kaemmerer, D / Petrovitch, A / Zaknun, J / Baum, R P. ·Center for Neuroendocrine Tumors Bad Berka ENETS, Bad Berka, Germany. dieter.hoersch@zentralklinik.de ·Minerva Gastroenterol Dietol · Pubmed #23207615.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors originate from the diffuse neuroendocrine system in the pancreatic region. These tumors exhibit a rising incidence despite their rareness and due to their benign behavior a considerable prevalence. Pathogenesis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors is characterized by common pathways of hereditary and sporadic tumors. Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors may secrete peptide hormones or biogenic amines in an autonomous fashion as functional active tumors. Pathological grading and staging by TNM systems has been established in recent years classifying well and moderately differentiated pancreatice neuroendocrine tumors and poorly differentiated neuroendocrine carcinomas. Chromogranin A and less so pancreatic polypeptide are suitable tumor markers for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Expression of receptors for somatostatin is the basis of treatment of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors with somatostatin analogues as antisecretive and antiproliferative agents. In addition, somatostatin scintigraphy or PET/CT allows comprehensive diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, which should be supported by (endoscopic and contrast enhanced) ultrasound, CT and MRI. Therapy of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors consists of somatostatin analogues, chemotherapy, targeted therapy and peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. Two molecular substances hav been registered for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors recently, sunitinib (Sutent®) and everolimus (Afinitor®). Predominant tumor load in the liver may be treated by local ablative therapy or liver transplantation. These treatment options have been included in guidelines of several professional societies and weighted for sequential therapy of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors according to effects and side effects.

3 Review Role of PET/CT in the functional imaging of endocrine pancreatic tumors. 2012

Rufini, Vittoria / Baum, Richard P / Castaldi, Paola / Treglia, Giorgio / De Gaetano, Anna Maria / Carreras, Cecilia / Kaemmerer, Daniel / Hommann, Merten / Hörsch, Dieter / Bonomo, Lorenzo / Giordano, Alessandro. ·Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Agostino Gemelli Hospital, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Roma, Italy. v.rufini@rm.unicatt.it ·Abdom Imaging · Pubmed #22422069.

ABSTRACT: Endocrine pancreatic tumors (EPTs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms with variable clinical and biological features and prognosis, ranging from very slow-growing tumors to highly aggressive and very malignant ones. As other neuroendocrine tumors, EPTs are characterized by the presence of neuroamine uptake mechanisms and/or peptide receptors at the cell membrane and these features constitute the basis of the clinical use of specific radiolabeled ligands, both for imaging and therapy. The more widespread use of hybrid machines, i.e., positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT), allows to perform imaging with high resolution and high diagnostic accuracy especially for small lesions, and to correlate anatomic location with function. The recent WHO recommendations for classification and prognostic factors help the selection of tracers likely to show a positive image on PET; therefore, tracers exploiting specific metabolic patterns ((18)F-DOPA and (11)C-5-HTP) or specific receptor expression ((68)Ga-DOTA-peptides) are suited to well-differentiated tumors, while the use of (18)F-FDG is preferred for poorly-differentiated neoplasms with high proliferative activity and loss of neuroendocrine features. In differentiated EPTs, (11)C-5-HTP performs better than (18)F-DOPA even though its use is hampered by its complex production and limited availability and experience; (68)Ga-peptides are indicated for all type of gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumors, regardless of their functional activity. In addition, (68)Ga-DOTA-peptides play a distinctive role in planning peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

4 Article A precision oncology approach to the pharmacological targeting of mechanistic dependencies in neuroendocrine tumors. 2018

Alvarez, Mariano J / Subramaniam, Prem S / Tang, Laura H / Grunn, Adina / Aburi, Mahalaxmi / Rieckhof, Gabrielle / Komissarova, Elena V / Hagan, Elizabeth A / Bodei, Lisa / Clemons, Paul A / Dela Cruz, Filemon S / Dhall, Deepti / Diolaiti, Daniel / Fraker, Douglas A / Ghavami, Afshin / Kaemmerer, Daniel / Karan, Charles / Kidd, Mark / Kim, Kyoung M / Kim, Hee C / Kunju, Lakshmi P / Langel, Ülo / Li, Zhong / Lee, Jeeyun / Li, Hai / LiVolsi, Virginia / Pfragner, Roswitha / Rainey, Allison R / Realubit, Ronald B / Remotti, Helen / Regberg, Jakob / Roses, Robert / Rustgi, Anil / Sepulveda, Antonia R / Serra, Stefano / Shi, Chanjuan / Yuan, Xiaopu / Barberis, Massimo / Bergamaschi, Roberto / Chinnaiyan, Arul M / Detre, Tony / Ezzat, Shereen / Frilling, Andrea / Hommann, Merten / Jaeger, Dirk / Kim, Michelle K / Knudsen, Beatrice S / Kung, Andrew L / Leahy, Emer / Metz, David C / Milsom, Jeffrey W / Park, Young S / Reidy-Lagunes, Diane / Schreiber, Stuart / Washington, Kay / Wiedenmann, Bertram / Modlin, Irvin / Califano, Andrea. ·Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · DarwinHealth Inc, New York, NY, USA. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Institute for Systems Genetics, New York University Langone Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Urology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Division of Pathology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA. · Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA. · PsychoGenics Inc., Tarrytown, NY, USA. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik, Bad Berka, Germany. · Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Wren Laboratories, Branford, CT, USA. · Division of Hematology Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. · Michigan Center for Translational Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Pathology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Neurochemistry, the Arrhenius Laboratories for Nat. Sci., Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden. · Laboratory of Molecular Biotechnology, Institute of Technology, University of Tartu, Tartu, Estonia. · Falconwood Foundation, New York, NY, USA. · Institute of Pathophysiology and Immunology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Pathology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Pathology, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Pathology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN, USA. · Division of Colon and Rectal Surgery, State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY, USA. · Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Department of Urology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. · Imperial College London, London, UK. · Medical Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases Heidelberg, University Medical Center Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Surgery, New York-Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA. · Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Charite, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Emeritus Professor Gastrointestinal Surgery, School of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. imodlin@irvinmodlin.com. · Department of Systems Biology, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · Department of Biomedical Informatics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biophysics, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · J.P. Sulzberger Columbia Genome Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. · Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. califano@cumc.columbia.edu. ·Nat Genet · Pubmed #29915428.

ABSTRACT: We introduce and validate a new precision oncology framework for the systematic prioritization of drugs targeting mechanistic tumor dependencies in individual patients. Compounds are prioritized on the basis of their ability to invert the concerted activity of master regulator proteins that mechanistically regulate tumor cell state, as assessed from systematic drug perturbation assays. We validated the approach on a cohort of 212 gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), a rare malignancy originating in the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract. The analysis identified several master regulator proteins, including key regulators of neuroendocrine lineage progenitor state and immunoevasion, whose role as critical tumor dependencies was experimentally confirmed. Transcriptome analysis of GEP-NET-derived cells, perturbed with a library of 107 compounds, identified the HDAC class I inhibitor entinostat as a potent inhibitor of master regulator activity for 42% of metastatic GEP-NET patients, abrogating tumor growth in vivo. This approach may thus complement current efforts in precision oncology.

5 Article Inverse expression of somatostatin and CXCR4 chemokine receptors in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms of different malignancy. 2015

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Träger, Tina / Hoffmeister, Maike / Sipos, Bence / Hommann, Merten / Sänger, Jörg / Schulz, Stefan / Lupp, Amelie. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany. · Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Tuebingen, Germany. · Institute of Pathology and Cytology, Bad Berka, Germany. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #26259237.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are widely distributed in well-differentiated neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) and serve as primary targets for diagnostics and treatment. An overexpression of the chemokine receptor CXCR4, in contrast, is considered to be present mainly in highly proliferative and advanced tumors. Comparative data are still lacking, however, for neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC). METHODS: SSTR subtype (1, 2A, 3, 5) and CXCR4 expression was evaluated in G1 (n = 31), G2 (n = 47), and low (G3a; Ki-67: 21-49%; n = 21) and highly proliferative (G3b; Ki-67: >50%, n = 22) G3 (total n = 43) gastroenteropancreatic NEN samples by performing immunohistochemistry with monoclonal rabbit anti-human anti-SSTR and anti-CXCR4 antibodies, respectively, and was correlated with clinical data. RESULTS: Both CXCR4 and SSTR were widely expressed in all tumors investigated. CXCR4 expression differed significantly between the G1 and G3 specimens and within the G3 group (G3a to G3b), and was positively correlated with Ki-67 expression. SSTR2A, in contrast, exhibited an inverse association with Ki-67. SSTR2A was highly expressed in G1 and G2 tumors, but was significantly less abundant in G3 carcinomas. Additionally, SSTR1 expression was higher in G3a than in G3b tumors. CONCLUSION: We observed an elevation in CXCR4 and a decrease in SSTR2A expression with increasing malignancy. Interestingly, 23% of the G3 specimens had strong SSTR2A expression. Because CXCR4 was strongly expressed in highly proliferative G3 carcinomas, it is an interesting new target and needs to be validated in larger studies.

6 Article Analysis of somatostatin receptor 2A immunohistochemistry, RT-qPCR, and in vivo PET/CT data in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm. 2015

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Wirtz, Ralph M / Fischer, Elke K / Hommann, Merten / Sänger, Jörg / Prasad, Vikas / Specht, Elisa / Baum, Richard P / Schulz, Stefan / Lupp, Amelie. ·From the *Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka; †STRATIFYER Molecular Pathology GmbH, Cologne; ‡Laboratory of Pathology and Cytology, Bad Berka; §Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Charité, Berlin; ∥Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena; and ¶Department of Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging, Center for PET, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25872131.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Gallium 68 somatostatin receptor (SSTR) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is one of the most sensitive imaging methods for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The aim of the study was to correlate the receptor density generated from the static PET/CT (maximum standard uptake values [SUVmax], mean standard uptake values [SUVmean]) with subtype 2A SSTR (SSTR2A) immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) gene-expression data. METHODS: Thirty-nine tumor specimens (17 primary pancreatic tumors [PTs], 22 metastases [MTS]) of 19 patients with PET/CT scans preoperatively were evaluated. Subtype 2A SSTR expression was quantified immunohistochemically (immunoreactive score [IRS]) and on messenger RNA (mRNA) level by RT-qPCR. RESULTS: The PT and MTS did not differ significantly in their SUVmax (P = 0.07) but displayed a dissimilarity with respect to their SSTR2A expression (mean [SD] IRS PT, 8.8 [3.6] vs mean [SD] IRS MTS, 5.1 [4.5]; P = 0.02).The SUVmean was highly significantly correlated to SSTR2A mRNA expression (C = 0.85, P < 0.001) and moderately to SSTR2A protein expression (C = 0.53, P = 0.05). Moreover, the SUVmax correlated moderately with SSTR2A protein expression (C = 0.44, P = 0.03) and mRNA expression (C = 0.64, P = 0.042). CONCLUSIONS: The SUVmax and SUVmean are reliable ex vivo parameters for in vivo quantification of SSTR expression in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Both immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR are comparable methods for SSTR2A quantification. The PT and MTS differ significantly in their SSTR2A expression. This fact should be taken into account when treating patients with somatostatin analogs or peptide receptor radionuclide therapy.

7 Article FOXM1: A novel drug target in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2015

Briest, Franziska / Berg, Erika / Grass, Irina / Freitag, Helma / Kaemmerer, Daniel / Lewens, Florentine / Christen, Friederike / Arsenic, Ruza / Altendorf-Hofmann, Annelore / Kunze, Almut / Sänger, Jörg / Knösel, Thomas / Siegmund, Britta / Hummel, Michael / Grabowski, Patricia. ·Department of Gastroenterology, Infectious Diseases, Rheumatology CC13, Medizinische Klinik 1, CBF, Germany. · Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Freie Universität (FU) Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, CBF, Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Germany. · Institute of Biology, Humboldt-Universität Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, CCM, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Vascular Surgery, Friedrich-Schiller-Universität (FSU) Jena, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Bad Berka, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU), Munich, Germany. · Department of Internal Oncology and Hematology, Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Germany. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #25797272.

ABSTRACT: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs) are heterogeneous tumors that need to be molecularly defined to obtain novel therapeutic options. Forkheadbox protein M1 (FOXM1) is a crucial transcription factor in neoplastic cells and has been associated with differentiation and proliferation. We found that FOXM1 is strongly associated with tumor differentiation and occurrence of metastases in gastrointestinal NENs. In vitro inhibition by the FOXM1 inhibitor siomycin A led to down-regulation of mitotic proteins and resulted in a strong inhibitory effect. Siomycin A decreased mitosis rate, induced apoptosis in GEP-NEN cell lines and exerts synergistic effects with chemotherapy. FOXM1 is associated with clinical outcome and FOXM1 inhibition impairs survival in vitro. We therefore propose FOXM1 as novel therapeutic target in GEP-NENs.

8 Article Somatostatin receptor immunohistochemistry in neuroendocrine tumors: comparison between manual and automated evaluation. 2014

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Athelogou, Maria / Lupp, Amelie / Lenhardt, Isabell / Schulz, Stefan / Luisa, Peter / Hommann, Merten / Prasad, Vikas / Binnig, Gerd / Baum, Richard Paul. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka Bad Berka, Germany. · Department of Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging, Center for PET, Zentralklinik Bad Berka Bad Berka, Germany. · Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Jena University Hospital Jena, Germany. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Charité Berlin Germany ; Department of Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging, Center for PET, Zentralklinik Bad Berka Bad Berka, Germany. · Definiens AG Munich, Germany. ·Int J Clin Exp Pathol · Pubmed #25197368.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Manual evaluation of somatostatin receptor (SSTR) immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a time-consuming and cost-intensive procedure. Aim of the study was to compare manual evaluation of SSTR subtype IHC to an automated software-based analysis, and to in-vivo imaging by SSTR-based PET/CT. METHODS: We examined 25 gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (GEP-NET) patients and correlated their in-vivo SSTR-PET/CT data (determined by the standardized uptake values SUVmax,-mean) with the corresponding ex-vivo IHC data of SSTR subtype (1, 2A, 4, 5) expression. Exactly the same lesions were imaged by PET/CT, resected and analyzed by IHC in each patient. After manual evaluation, the IHC slides were digitized and automatically evaluated for SSTR expression by Definiens XD software. A virtual IHC score "BB1" was created for comparing the manual and automated analysis of SSTR expression. RESULTS: BB1 showed a significant correlation with the corresponding conventionally determined Her2/neu score of the SSTR-subtypes 2A (rs: 0.57), 4 (rs: 0.44) and 5 (rs: 0.43). BB1 of SSTR2A also significantly correlated with the SUVmax (rs: 0.41) and the SUVmean (rs: 0.50). Likewise, a significant correlation was seen between the conventionally evaluated SSTR2A status and the SUVmax (rs: 0.42) and SUVmean (rs: 0.62). CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that the evaluation of the SSTR status by automated analysis (BB1 score), using digitized histopathology slides ("virtual microscopy"), corresponds well with the SSTR2A, 4 and 5 expression as determined by conventional manual histopathology. The BB1 score also exhibited a significant association to the SSTR-PET/CT data in accordance with the high affinity profile of the SSTR analogues used for imaging.

9 Article Molecular imaging of late somatostatin receptor-positive metastases of renal cell carcinoma in the pancreas by 68Ga DOTATOC PET/CT: a rare differential diagnosis to multiple primary pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2014

Peter, Luisa / Sänger, Jörg / Hommann, Merten / Baum, Richard Paul / Kaemmerer, Daniel. ·From the *Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, ENETS Center of Excellence; †Laboratory of Pathology and Cytology; and ‡Department of Molecular Radiotherapy/Center for Molecular Imaging (PET/CT), Zentralklinik Bad Berka, ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka, Germany. ·Clin Nucl Med · Pubmed #24561680.

ABSTRACT: Ga somatostatin receptor PET/CT, currently the most sensitive imaging modality for well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors, is based on the molecular imaging of somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) that are expressed in different tumor entities such as neuroendocrine neoplasms, lymphomas, meningiomas, or renal cell cancer (RCC). Most neuroendocrine neoplasms show a high expression of SSTR subtypes 2A and 5, whereas the overexpression of SSTR2A in RCC is mainly seen in peritumoral vessels. Here we report a case with strongly SSTR-positive pancreatic lesions detected by Ga DOTATOC PET/CT, which histologically turned out to be ultralate metastases of a RCC.

10 Article Correlation of monoclonal and polyclonal somatostatin receptor 5 antibodies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2013

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Lupp, Amelie / Peter, Luisa / Fischer, Elke / Schulz, Stefan / Klöppel, Günter / Hommann, Merten. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka Bad Berka, Germany. Daniel.Kaemmerer@zentralklinik.de ·Int J Clin Exp Pathol · Pubmed #23236542.

ABSTRACT: AIMS: To evaluate the frequency of somatostatin-receptor 5 (SSTR 5) in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors by using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. MATERIAL AND METHOD: we analyzed 66 proven pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors immunohistochemically with monoclonal (clone UMB-4) and polyclonal SSTR 5-antibodies. Immunoreactive score (IRS) and DAKO-score Her2/neu were evaluated. RESULTS: Immunohistochemistry analysis demonstrated for the IRS a significant higher staining of all specimen using the monoclonal antibodies ( IRS SSTR5 poly vs IRS SSTR 5 mono; 20.0% vs 30.3% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.21; p = 0.04. For the HER2 score there was also a significant higher staining in the monoclonal group (Her2 SSTR 5 poly vs Her2 SSTR 5 mono; 21.5% vs 28.8% p < 0.001) by a correlation of 0.20; p = 0.08. CONCLUSION: Both antibodies are useful in staining of SSTR, although UMB-4 demonstrated a 10% higher SSTR 5 staining. Due to the previous underestimated expression rate of SSTR 5, current standards in diagnostics and therapy should be reconsidered. The increasing usage of long-acting pansomatostatin receptor analogues will rise the adverse effects connected to SSTR5 binding.

11 Article [Expert dialogue: neuroendocrine tumours of the lungs and gastroenteropancreatic system]. 2012

Hörsch, D / Sayeg, Y / Bonnet, R / Kaemmerer, D / Presselt, N / Baum, R P. ·Zentrum für Neuroendokrine Tumore Bad Berka–ENETS Center of Excellence und Klinik für Innere Medizin, Gastroenterologie und Endokrinologie, Deutschland. ·Pneumologie · Pubmed #22250054.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Neuroendocrine tumours of the lung exhibit an increasing incidence and prevalence. However, data on the diagnosis of and therapy for these tumours are sparse compared to neuroendocrine tumours of the gastroenteropancreatic system. METHODS: The present article reflects a dialogue between experts on neuroendocrine tumors of the lung and the gastroenteropancreatic system held on February 25th and 26th in Weimar, Germany. RESULTS: Many similarities exist between neuroendocrine tumours of the lung and the gastroenteropancreatic system but there are also significant differences. Similarities exist mainly concerning pathology, diagnosis and therapy. Differences exist regarding the systemic therapy and the significantly lower incidence of paraneoplastic syndromes. Somatostatin receptor PET/CT with gallium-68 labelled somatostatin analogues and peptide receptor radiotherapy are innovative methods for the diagnosis of and therapy for neuroendocrine tumours of the lung. The first treatment option remains complete resection of the tumour. Small molecules like everolimus (Afinitor®) have been tested in clinical trials and have been shown to prolong progression-free survival. CONCLUSIONS: Additional studies are necessary and efforts should be undertaken to establish a registry to increase data on methods suitable for he diagnosis of and therapy for neuroendocrine tumours of the lung.

12 Article Concomitant lung and gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors and the value of gallium-68 PET/CT. 2011

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Khatib-Chahidi, Karl / Paul Baum, Richard / Hörsch, Dieter / Presselt, Norbert / Sänger, Jörg / Kunze, Almut / Hommann, Merten. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Germany. daniel.kaemmerer@zentralklinik.de ·Cancer Imaging · Pubmed #22123527.

ABSTRACT: Well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) of the lung occur as typical and atypical carcinoids. Little is known about the biology of these tumors in respect of their ability to metastasize or the probability of development of concomitant neuroendocrine tumors. Here we report a patient diagnosed with a second neuroendocrine tumor of the ileum 4 years after curative resection of a typical carcinoid of the left lung. The intestinal neuroendocrine tumor was successfully detected by gallium-68 based somatostatin receptor positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and surgically removed using gamma probe detection based on the same labeling. This case report underlines the utility of somatostatin receptor PET/CT based detection and follow-up of NETs.

13 Article Molecular imaging with ⁶⁸Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours. 2011

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Peter, Luisa / Lupp, Amelie / Schulz, Stefan / Sänger, Jörg / Prasad, Vikas / Kulkarni, Harshad / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hommann, Merten / Baum, Richard Paul. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Robert-Koch-Allee 9, 99437 Bad Berka, Germany. Daniel.Kaemmerer@zentralklinik.de ·Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging · Pubmed #21626438.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. METHODS: Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV(max) and SUV(mean)) were used for PET/CT. RESULTS: The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV(max) on the PET/CT (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) and the IRS for SSTR2A with the SUV(mean) (p < 0.013). The level of SSTR2A score correlated significantly with chromogranin A staining and indirectly to the tumour grading. CONCLUSION: The highly significant correlation between SSTR2A and SSTR5 and the SUV(max) on the (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy.

14 Article Neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy for an inoperable neuroendocrine pancreatic tumor. 2009

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Prasad, Vikas / Daffner, Wolfgang / Hörsch, Dieter / Klöppel, Günter / Hommann, Merten / Baum, Richard P. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, 99437 Bad Berka, Germany. d.kaemmerer.avc@zentralklinik-bad-berka.de ·World J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #19998512.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic endocrine tumors are rare but are among the most common neuroendocrine neoplasms of the abdomen. At diagnosis many of them are already advanced and difficult to treat. We report on an initially inoperable malignant pancreatic endocrine tumor in a 33-year-old woman, who received neoadjuvant peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) as first-line treatment. This resulted in a significant downstaging of the tumor and allowed its subsequent complete surgical removal. Follow-up for eighteen months revealed a complete remission. This is the first report on neoadjuvant PRRT in a neuroendocrine neoplasm with subsequent successful complete resection.

15 Minor Successful endoscopic ultrasound-guided ethanol ablation of a symptomatic sporadic insulinoma in a patient with severe comorbidities not suitable for pancreatic surgery. 2018

Burghardt, K / Kaemmerer, D / Michael, A / Aschenbach, R / Müller, U A / Kloos, C / Wolf, G. ·Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany. Electronic address: katharina.burghardt@med.uni-jena.de. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany. · Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine IV, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany. · Institute of Diagnostical and Interventional Radiology, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany. · Division of Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena University Hospital, Jena, Germany. ·Diabetes Metab · Pubmed #28161372.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --