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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jinping Jia
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Jinping Jia wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Characterising 2018

Zhang, Mingfeng / Lykke-Andersen, Soren / Zhu, Bin / Xiao, Wenming / Hoskins, Jason W / Zhang, Xijun / Rost, Lauren M / Collins, Irene / Bunt, Martijn van de / Jia, Jinping / Parikh, Hemang / Zhang, Tongwu / Song, Lei / Jermusyk, Ashley / Chung, Charles C / Zhu, Bin / Zhou, Weiyin / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Yeager, Meredith / Jensen, Torben Heick / Brown, Kevin M / Ongen, Halit / Bamlet, William R / Murray, Bradley A / McCarthy, Mark I / Chanock, Stephen J / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Wolpin, Brian M / Smith, Jill P / Olson, Sara H / Petersen, Gloria M / Shi, Jianxin / Amundadottir, Laufey. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Biostatistics Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Bioinformatics and Biostatistics, National Center for Toxicological Research, FDA, Jefferson, Missouri, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. · Department of Genetic Medicine and Development, University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva, Switzerland. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Division of Epidemiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · The Eli and Edythe L Broad Institute of Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University Cambridge, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. · Oxford NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, Churchill Hospital, Headington, Oxford, UK. · Department of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, D.C., USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York, USA. ·Gut · Pubmed #28634199.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To elucidate the genetic architecture of gene expression in pancreatic tissues. DESIGN: We performed expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in histologically normal pancreatic tissue samples (n=95) using RNA sequencing and the corresponding 1000 genomes imputed germline genotypes. Data from pancreatic tumour-derived tissue samples (n=115) from The Cancer Genome Atlas were included for comparison. RESULTS: We identified 38 615 CONCLUSIONS: We have identified

2 Article Functional characterization of a multi-cancer risk locus on chr5p15.33 reveals regulation of TERT by ZNF148. 2017

Fang, Jun / Jia, Jinping / Makowski, Matthew / Xu, Mai / Wang, Zhaoming / Zhang, Tongwu / Hoskins, Jason W / Choi, Jiyeon / Han, Younghun / Zhang, Mingfeng / Thomas, Janelle / Kovacs, Michael / Collins, Irene / Dzyadyk, Marta / Thompson, Abbey / O'Neill, Maura / Das, Sudipto / Lan, Qi / Koster, Roelof / Anonymous4670904 / Anonymous4680904 / Anonymous4690904 / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Kraft, Peter / Wolpin, Brian M / Jansen, Pascal W T C / Olson, Sara / McGlynn, Katherine A / Kanetsky, Peter A / Chatterjee, Nilanjan / Barrett, Jennifer H / Dunning, Alison M / Taylor, John C / Newton-Bishop, Julia A / Bishop, D Timothy / Andresson, Thorkell / Petersen, Gloria M / Amos, Christopher I / Iles, Mark M / Nathanson, Katherine L / Landi, Maria Teresa / Vermeulen, Michiel / Brown, Kevin M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. · Department of Molecular Biology, Radboud Institute for Molecular Life Sciences, Radboud University, Nijmegen 6500 HB, The Netherlands. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. · Department of Community and Family Medicine, Geisel School of Medicine, Dartmouth College, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03756, USA. · Protein Characterization Laboratory, Cancer Research Technology Program, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland 21701, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York City, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Cancer Epidemiology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida 33612, USA. · Section of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds LS9 7TF, UK. · Department of Oncology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XZ, UK. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Translational Medicine and Human Genetics, Department of Medicine and Abramson Cancer Center, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ·Nat Commun · Pubmed #28447668.

ABSTRACT: Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have mapped multiple independent cancer susceptibility loci to chr5p15.33. Here, we show that fine-mapping of pancreatic and testicular cancer GWAS within one of these loci (Region 2 in CLPTM1L) focuses the signal to nine highly correlated SNPs. Of these, rs36115365-C associated with increased pancreatic and testicular but decreased lung cancer and melanoma risk, and exhibited preferred protein-binding and enhanced regulatory activity. Transcriptional gene silencing of this regulatory element repressed TERT expression in an allele-specific manner. Proteomic analysis identifies allele-preferred binding of Zinc finger protein 148 (ZNF148) to rs36115365-C, further supported by binding of purified recombinant ZNF148. Knockdown of ZNF148 results in reduced TERT expression, telomerase activity and telomere length. Our results indicate that the association with chr5p15.33-Region 2 may be explained by rs36115365, a variant influencing TERT expression via ZNF148 in a manner consistent with elevated TERT in carriers of the C allele.

3 Article Functional characterization of a chr13q22.1 pancreatic cancer risk locus reveals long-range interaction and allele-specific effects on DIS3 expression. 2016

Hoskins, Jason W / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Emmanuel, Mickey A / Manmiller, Sarah M / Wu, Yinglun / O'Neill, Maura / Jia, Jinping / Collins, Irene / Zhang, Mingfeng / Thomas, Janelle V / Rost, Lauren M / Das, Sudipto / Parikh, Hemang / Haake, Jefferson M / Matters, Gail L / Kurtz, Robert C / Bamlet, William R / Klein, Alison / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael / Wolpin, Brian M / Yarden, Ronit / Wang, Zhaoming / Smith, Jill / Olson, Sara H / Andresson, Thorkell / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Protein Characterization Laboratory, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, MD, USA. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA. · Department of Human Science, NHS, Georgetown University Medical Center, NW, Washington DC, USA. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN, USA · Department of Medicine, Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, DC, and Department of Medicine, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey PA, USA. ·Hum Mol Genet · Pubmed #28172817.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple common susceptibility loci for pancreatic cancer. Here we report fine-mapping and functional analysis of one such locus residing in a 610 kb gene desert on chr13q22.1 (marked by rs9543325). The closest candidate genes, KLF5, KLF12, PIBF1, DIS3 and BORA, range in distance from 265-586 kb. Sequencing three sub-regions containing the top ranked SNPs by imputation P-value revealed a 30 bp insertion/deletion (indel) variant that was significantly associated with pancreatic cancer risk (rs386772267, P = 2.30 × 10

4 Article Three new pancreatic cancer susceptibility signals identified on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33 and 8q24.21. 2016

Zhang, Mingfeng / Wang, Zhaoming / Obazee, Ofure / Jia, Jinping / Childs, Erica J / Hoskins, Jason / Figlioli, Gisella / Mocci, Evelina / Collins, Irene / Chung, Charles C / Hautman, Christopher / Arslan, Alan A / Beane-Freeman, Laura / Bracci, Paige M / Buring, Julie / Duell, Eric J / Gallinger, Steven / Giles, Graham G / Goodman, Gary E / Goodman, Phyllis J / Kamineni, Aruna / Kolonel, Laurence N / Kulke, Matthew H / Malats, Núria / Olson, Sara H / Sesso, Howard D / Visvanathan, Kala / White, Emily / Zheng, Wei / Abnet, Christian C / Albanes, Demetrius / Andreotti, Gabriella / Brais, Lauren / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Basso, Daniela / Berndt, Sonja I / Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine / Bijlsma, Maarten F / Brenner, Hermann / Burdette, Laurie / Campa, Daniele / Caporaso, Neil E / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Cotterchio, Michelle / Costello, Eithne / Elena, Joanne / Boggi, Ugo / Gaziano, J Michael / Gazouli, Maria / Giovannucci, Edward L / Goggins, Michael / Gross, Myron / Haiman, Christopher A / Hassan, Manal / Helzlsouer, Kathy J / Hu, Nan / Hunter, David J / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, Elzbieta / Jenab, Mazda / Kaaks, Rudolf / Key, Timothy J / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Klein, Eric A / Kogevinas, Manolis / Krogh, Vittorio / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kurtz, Robert C / Landi, Maria T / Landi, Stefano / Le Marchand, Loic / Mambrini, Andrea / Mannisto, Satu / Milne, Roger L / Neale, Rachel E / Oberg, Ann L / Panico, Salvatore / Patel, Alpa V / Peeters, Petra H M / Peters, Ulrike / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Porta, Miquel / Purdue, Mark / Quiros, J Ramón / Riboli, Elio / Rothman, Nathaniel / Scarpa, Aldo / Scelo, Ghislaine / Shu, Xiao-Ou / Silverman, Debra T / Soucek, Pavel / Strobel, Oliver / Sund, Malin / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Taylor, Philip R / Tavano, Francesca / Travis, Ruth C / Thornquist, Mark / Tjønneland, Anne / Tobias, Geoffrey S / Trichopoulos, Dimitrios / Vashist, Yogesh / Vodicka, Pavel / Wactawski-Wende, Jean / Wentzensen, Nicolas / Yu, Herbert / Yu, Kai / Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, Anne / Kooperberg, Charles / Risch, Harvey A / Jacobs, Eric J / Li, Donghui / Fuchs, Charles / Hoover, Robert / Hartge, Patricia / Chanock, Stephen J / Petersen, Gloria M / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael S / Wolpin, Brian M / Kraft, Peter / Klein, Alison P / Canzian, Federico / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Cancer Genomics Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc., Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland, USA. · Department of Computational Biology, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee, USA. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Environmental Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA,. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA. · Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Division of Aging, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Barcelona, Spain. · Lunenfeld Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Cancer Epidemiology Centre, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Centre for Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Southwest Oncology Group Statistical Center, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Group Health Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Cancer Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA. · Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy,. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Nutrition, Hormones and Women's Health Team, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · University Paris Sud, UMRS 1018, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · IGR, F-94805, Villejuif, France. · Laboratory for Experimental Oncology and Radiobiology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. · National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Massachusetts Veteran's Epidemiology, Research, and Information Center, Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Channing Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Pathology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Medicine, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center and Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. · Laboratory of Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. · Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, USA. · Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas, USA. · Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), Lyon, France. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio, USA. · Centre de Recerca en Epidemiologia Ambiental (CREAL), CIBER Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Spain. · Hospital del Mar Institute of Medical Research (IMIM), Barcelona, Spain. · National School of Public Health, Athens, Greece. · Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, USA. · Oncology Department, ASL1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Chronic Disease Prevention, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Population Health, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Division of Biomedical Statistics and Informatics, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Dipartimento di Medicina Clinica E Chirurgia, Federico II Univeristy, Naples, Italy. · Epidemiology Research Program, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. · Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · School of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · CIBER de Epidemiología y Salud Pública (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain. · Public Health and Participation Directorate, Asturias, Spain. · ARC-NET: Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Surgical and Peroperative Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łodz, Łodz, Poland. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Bureau of Epidemiologic Research, Academy of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Hellenic Health Foundation, Athens, Greece. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA. · New York University Cancer Institute, New York, New York, USA. · Division of Public Health Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA,. · Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. · Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. · Department of Epidemiology, the Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27579533.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified common pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants at 13 chromosomal loci in individuals of European descent. To identify new susceptibility variants, we performed imputation based on 1000 Genomes (1000G) Project data and association analysis using 5,107 case and 8,845 control subjects from 27 cohort and case-control studies that participated in the PanScan I-III GWAS. This analysis, in combination with a two-staged replication in an additional 6,076 case and 7,555 control subjects from the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) and Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control (PanC4) Consortia uncovered 3 new pancreatic cancer risk signals marked by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs2816938 at chromosome 1q32.1 (per allele odds ratio (OR) = 1.20, P = 4.88x10 -15), rs10094872 at 8q24.21 (OR = 1.15, P = 3.22x10 -9) and rs35226131 at 5p15.33 (OR = 0.71, P = 1.70x10 -8). These SNPs represent independent risk variants at previously identified pancreatic cancer risk loci on chr1q32.1 ( NR5A2), chr8q24.21 ( MYC) and chr5p15.33 ( CLPTM1L- TERT) as per analyses conditioned on previously reported susceptibility variants. We assessed expression of candidate genes at the three risk loci in histologically normal ( n = 10) and tumor ( n = 8) derived pancreatic tissue samples and observed a marked reduction of NR5A2 expression (chr1q32.1) in the tumors (fold change -7.6, P = 5.7x10 -8). This finding was validated in a second set of paired ( n = 20) histologically normal and tumor derived pancreatic tissue samples (average fold change for three NR5A2 isoforms -31.3 to -95.7, P = 7.5x10 -4-2.0x10 -3). Our study has identified new susceptibility variants independently conferring pancreatic cancer risk that merit functional follow-up to identify target genes and explain the underlying biology.

5 Article Transcriptome analysis of pancreatic cancer reveals a tumor suppressor function for HNF1A. 2014

Hoskins, Jason W / Jia, Jinping / Flandez, Marta / Parikh, Hemang / Xiao, Wenming / Collins, Irene / Emmanuel, Mickey A / Ibrahim, Abdisamad / Powell, John / Zhang, Lizhi / Malats, Nuria / Bamlet, William R / Petersen, Gloria M / Real, Francisco X / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain, Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute and Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis Section, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA and Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain. · Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute and. · Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis Section, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. · Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and. · Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA and. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain, Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain. · Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, CNIO-Spanish National Cancer Research Centre, E-28029 Madrid, Spain, Lymphoid Malignancies Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute and Bioinformatics and Molecular Analysis Section, Division of Computational Bioscience, Center for Information Technology, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology and Division of Epidemiology, Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA and Departament de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #25233928.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is driven by the accumulation of somatic mutations, epigenetic modifications and changes in the micro-environment. New approaches to investigating disruptions of gene expression networks promise to uncover key regulators and pathways in carcinogenesis. We performed messenger RNA-sequencing in pancreatic normal (n = 10) and tumor (n = 8) derived tissue samples, as well as in pancreatic cancer cell lines (n = 9), to determine differential gene expression (DE) patterns. Sub-network enrichment analyses identified HNF1A as the regulator of the most significantly and consistently dysregulated expression sub-network in pancreatic tumor tissues and cells (median P = 7.56×10(-7), median rank = 1, range = 1-25). To explore the effects of HNF1A expression in pancreatic tumor-derived cells, we generated stable HNF1A-inducible clones in two pancreatic cancer cell lines (PANC-1 and MIA PaCa-2) and observed growth inhibition (5.3-fold, P = 4.5×10(-5) for MIA PaCa-2 clones; 7.2-fold, P = 2.2×10(-5) for PANC-1 clones), and a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis upon induction. These effects correlated with HNF1A-induced down-regulation of 51 of 84 cell cycle genes (e.g. E2F1, CDK2, CDK4, MCM2/3/4/5, SKP2 and CCND1), decreased expression of anti-apoptotic genes (e.g. BIRC2/5/6 and AKT) and increased expression of pro-apoptotic genes (e.g. CASP4/9/10 and APAF1). In light of the established role of HNF1A in the regulation of pancreatic development and homeostasis, our data suggest that it also functions as an important tumor suppressor in the pancreas.

6 Article CLPTM1L promotes growth and enhances aneuploidy in pancreatic cancer cells. 2014

Jia, Jinping / Bosley, Allen D / Thompson, Abbey / Hoskins, Jason W / Cheuk, Adam / Collins, Irene / Parikh, Hemang / Xiao, Zhen / Ylaya, Kris / Dzyadyk, Marta / Cozen, Wendy / Hernandez, Brenda Y / Lynch, Charles F / Loncarek, Jadranka / Altekruse, Sean F / Zhang, Lizhi / Westlake, Christopher J / Factor, Valentina M / Thorgeirsson, Snorri / Bamlet, William R / Hewitt, Stephen M / Petersen, Gloria M / Andresson, Thorkell / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Authors' Affiliations: Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; Pediatric Oncology Branch; Laboratory of Pathology; Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences; Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda; Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research; Laboratory of Protein Dynamics and Signaling and Laboratory of Cell & Developmental Signaling, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland; Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; and Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. · Authors' Affiliations: Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics; Pediatric Oncology Branch; Laboratory of Pathology; Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences; Laboratory of Experimental Carcinogenesis, National Cancer Institute, NIH, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda; Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research; Laboratory of Protein Dynamics and Signaling and Laboratory of Cell & Developmental Signaling, NCI-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland; Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California; University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii; Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; and Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #24648346.

ABSTRACT: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of 10 different cancers have identified pleiotropic cancer predisposition loci across a region of chromosome 5p15.33 that includes the TERT and CLPTM1L genes. Of these, susceptibility alleles for pancreatic cancer have mapped to the CLPTM1L gene, thus prompting an investigation of the function of CLPTM1L in the pancreas. Immunofluorescence analysis indicated that CLPTM1L localized to the endoplasmic reticulum where it is likely embedded in the membrane, in accord with multiple predicted transmembrane domains. Overexpression of CLPTM1L enhanced growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro (1.3-1.5-fold; PDAY7 < 0.003) and in vivo (3.46-fold; PDAY68 = 0.039), suggesting a role in tumor growth; this effect was abrogated by deletion of two hydrophilic domains. Affinity purification followed by mass spectrometry identified an interaction between CLPTM1L and non-muscle myosin II (NMM-II), a protein involved in maintaining cell shape, migration, and cytokinesis. The two proteins colocalized in the cytoplasm and, after treatment with a DNA-damaging agent, at the centrosomes. Overexpression of CLPTM1L and depletion of NMM-II induced aneuploidy, indicating that CLPTM1L may interfere with normal NMM-II function in regulating cytokinesis. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed enhanced staining of CLPTM1L in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 378) as compared with normal pancreatic tissue samples (n = 17; P = 1.7 × 10(-4)). Our results suggest that CLPTM1L functions as a growth-promoting gene in the pancreas and that overexpression may lead to an abrogation of normal cytokinesis, indicating that it should be considered as a plausible candidate gene that could explain the effect of pancreatic cancer susceptibility alleles on chr5p15.33.

7 Article An integrated transcriptome and epigenome analysis identifies a novel candidate gene for pancreatic cancer. 2013

Jia, Jinping / Parikh, Hemang / Xiao, Wenming / Hoskins, Jason W / Pflicke, Holger / Liu, Xuelu / Collins, Irene / Zhou, Weiyin / Wang, Zhaoming / Powell, John / Thorgeirsson, Snorri S / Rudloff, Udo / Petersen, Gloria M / Amundadottir, Laufey T. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. amundadottirl@mail.nih.gov. ·BMC Med Genomics · Pubmed #24053169.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal cancer with limited diagnostic and therapeutic modalities. METHODS: To begin to explore the genomic landscape of pancreatic cancer, we used massively parallel sequencing to catalog and compare transcribed regions and potential regulatory elements in two human cell lines derived from normal and cancerous pancreas. RESULTS: By RNA-sequencing, we identified 2,146 differentially expressed genes in these cell lines that were enriched in cancer related pathways and biological processes that include cell adhesion, growth factor and receptor activity, signaling, transcription and differentiation. Our high throughput Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequence analysis furthermore identified over 100,000 regions enriched in epigenetic marks, showing either positive (H3K4me1, H3K4me3, RNA Pol II) or negative (H3K27me3) correlation with gene expression. Notably, an overall enrichment of RNA Pol II binding and depletion of H3K27me3 binding were seen in the cancer derived cell line as compared to the normal derived cell line. By selecting genes for further assessment based on this difference, we confirmed enhanced expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1A3 (ALDH1A3) in two larger sets of pancreatic cancer cell lines and in tumor tissues as compared to normal derived tissues. CONCLUSIONS: As aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity is a key feature of cancer stem cells, our results indicate that a member of the ALDH superfamily, ALDH1A3, may be upregulated in pancreatic cancer, where it could mark pancreatic cancer stem cells.

8 Article A resequence analysis of genomic loci on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33, and 13q22.1 associated with pancreatic cancer risk. 2013

Parikh, Hemang / Jia, Jinping / Zhang, Xijun / Chung, Charles C / Jacobs, Kevin B / Yeager, Meredith / Boland, Joseph / Hutchinson, Amy / Burdett, Laura / Hoskins, Jason / Risch, Harvey A / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z / Chanock, Stephen J / Wolpin, Brian M / Petersen, Gloria M / Fuchs, Charles S / Hartge, Patricia / Amundadottir, Laufey. ·Laboratory of Translational Genomics, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #23295781.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to fine-map common pancreatic cancer susceptibility regions. METHODS: We conducted targeted Roche-454 resequencing across 428 kb in 3 genomic regions identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of pancreatic cancer, on chromosomes 1q32.1, 5p15.33, and 13q22.1. RESULTS: An analytical pipeline for calling genotypes was developed using HapMap samples sequenced on chr5p15.33. Concordance to 1000 Genomes data for chr5p15.33 was greater than 96%. The concordance for chr1q32.1 and chr13q22.1 with pancreatic cancer GWAS data was greater than 99%. Between 9.2% and 19.0% of variants detected were not present in 1000 Genomes for the respective continental population. The majority of completely novel single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were less common (minor allele frequency [MAF], ≤5%) or rare (MAF, ≤2%), illustrating the value of enlarging test sets for discovery of less common variants. Using the data set, we examined haplotype blocks across each region using a tag SNP analysis (r² > 0.8 for MAF of ≥5%) and determined that at least 196, 243, and 63 SNPs are required for fine-mapping chr1q32.1, chr5p15.33, and chr13q22.1, respectively, in European populations. CONCLUSIONS: We have characterized germline variation in 3 regions associated with pancreatic cancer risk and show that targeted resequencing leads to the discovery of novel variants and improves the completeness of germline sequence variants for fine-mapping GWAS susceptibility loci.