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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Bu-Tian Ji
Based on 6 articles published since 2010
(Why 6 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, B. T. Ji wrote the following 6 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Menstrual and Reproductive Factors, Hormone Use, and Risk of Pancreatic Cancer: Analysis From the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2016

Lujan-Barroso, Leila / Zhang, Wei / Olson, Sara H / Gao, Yu-Tang / Yu, Herbert / Baghurst, Peter A / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Foretová, Lenka / Gallinger, Steven / Holcatova, Ivana / Janout, Vladimír / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lagiou, Pagona / Li, Donghui / Miller, Anthony B / Serraino, Diego / Zatonski, Witold / Risch, Harvey A / Duell, Eric J. ·From the *Unit of Nutrition and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain; †Department of Epidemiology, Shanghai Cancer Institute and Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China; ‡Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; §Epidemiology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, HI; ∥Public Health, Women's and Children's Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; ¶University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA; #National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven; **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands; ††Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, UK; ‡‡Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia; §§Department of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute, Institute and MF MU, Brno, Czech Republic; ∥∥University Health Network, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ¶¶Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, Prague; ##Department of Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic; ***National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD; †††Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; ‡‡‡Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy; §§§Department of Hygiene, Epidemiology and Medical Statistics, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Greece; ∥∥∥Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; ¶¶¶M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, University of Texas, Houston, TX; ###Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada; ****Unit of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, CRO Aviano, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS, Aviano, Italy; ††††Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Warsaw, Poland; and ‡‡‡‡Department of Chronic Disease Epidemiology, Yale School of Public Health, New Haven, CT. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27088489.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We aimed to evaluate the relation between menstrual and reproductive factors, exogenous hormones, and risk of pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS: Eleven case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-control Consortium took part in the present study, including in total 2838 case and 4748 control women. Pooled estimates of odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a 2-step logistic regression model and adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: An inverse OR was observed in women who reported having had hysterectomy (ORyesvs.no, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.67-0.91), remaining significant in postmenopausal women and never-smoking women, adjusted for potential PC confounders. A mutually adjusted model with the joint effect for hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and hysterectomy showed significant inverse associations with PC in women who reported having had hysterectomy with HRT use (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: Our large pooled analysis suggests that women who have had a hysterectomy may have reduced risk of PC. However, we cannot rule out that the reduced risk could be due to factors or indications for having had a hysterectomy. Further investigation of risk according to HRT use and reason for hysterectomy may be necessary.

2 Article Allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis from the Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. 2013

Olson, Sara H / Hsu, Meier / Satagopan, Jaya M / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Silverman, Debra T / Lucenteforte, Ersilia / Anderson, Kristin E / Borgida, Ayelet / Bracci, Paige M / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Cotterchio, Michelle / Dai, Qi / Duell, Eric J / Fontham, Elizabeth H / Gallinger, Steven / Holly, Elizabeth A / Ji, Bu-Tian / Kurtz, Robert C / La Vecchia, Carlo / Lowenfels, Albert B / Luckett, Brian / Ludwig, Emmy / Petersen, Gloria M / Polesel, Jerry / Seminara, Daniela / Strayer, Lori / Talamini, Renato / Anonymous6300762. ·Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 307 East 63rd Street, New York, NY 10065, USA. olsons@mskcc.org ·Am J Epidemiol · Pubmed #23820785.

ABSTRACT: In order to quantify the risk of pancreatic cancer associated with history of any allergy and specific allergies, to investigate differences in the association with risk according to age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index, and to study the influence of age at onset, we pooled data from 10 case-control studies. In total, there were 3,567 cases and 9,145 controls. Study-specific odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for age, gender, smoking status, and body mass index. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed by using the Cochran Q statistic. Study-specific odds ratios were pooled by using a random-effects model. The odds ratio for any allergy was 0.79 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.62, 1.00) with heterogeneity among studies (P < 0.001). Heterogeneity was attributable to one study; with that study excluded, the pooled odds ratio was 0.73 (95% CI: 0.64, 0.84) (Pheterogeneity = 0.23). Hay fever (odds ratio = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.56, 0.96) and allergy to animals (odds ratio = 0.62, 95% CI: 0.41, 0.94) were related to lower risk, while there was no statistically significant association with other allergies or asthma. There were no major differences among subgroups defined by age, gender, smoking status, or body mass index. Older age at onset of allergies was slightly more protective than earlier age.

3 Article Pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer risk: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Duell, E J / Lucenteforte, E / Olson, S H / Bracci, P M / Li, D / Risch, H A / Silverman, D T / Ji, B T / Gallinger, S / Holly, E A / Fontham, E H / Maisonneuve, P / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Ghadirian, P / Kurtz, R C / Ludwig, E / Yu, H / Lowenfels, A B / Seminara, D / Petersen, G M / La Vecchia, C / Boffetta, P. ·Unit of Nutrition, Environment and Cancer, Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO-IDIBELL), Barcelona, Spain. eduell@iconcologia.net ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22767586.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatitis is a known risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, an unknown fraction of the disease is thought to be a consequence of tumor-related duct obstruction. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A pooled analysis of a history of pancreatitis and risk of pancreatic cancer was carried out considering the time interval between diagnoses and potential modification by covariates. Adjusted pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from 10 case-control studies (5048 cases of ductal pancreatic adenocarcinoma and 10,947 controls) taking part in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). RESULTS: The association between pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer was nearly three-fold at intervals of >2 years between diagnoses (OR: 2.71, 95% CI: 1.96-3.74) and much stronger at intervals of ≤2 years (OR: 13.56, 95% CI: 8.72-21.90) probably reflecting a combination of reverse causation and antecedent misdiagnosis of pancreas cancer as pancreatitis. The younger (<65 years) pancreatic cancer cases showed stronger associations with previous (>2 years) pancreatitis (OR: 3.91, 95% CI: 2.53-6.04) than the older (≥65 years) cases (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.02-2.76; P value for interaction: 0.006). CONCLUSIONS: Despite a moderately strong association between pancreatitis (diagnosed before >2 years) and pancreatic cancer, the population attributable fraction was estimated at 1.34% (95% CI: 0.612-2.07%), suggesting that a relatively small proportion of pancreatic cancer might be avoided if pancreatitis could be prevented.

4 Article Cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer: an analysis from the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (Panc4). 2012

Bosetti, C / Lucenteforte, E / Silverman, D T / Petersen, G / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Negri, E / Li, D / Risch, H A / Olson, S H / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Bertuccio, P / Gao, Y T / Hassan, M / Yu, H / Kurtz, R C / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Duell, E J / Boffetta, P / La Vecchia, C. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. cristina.bosetti@marionegri.it ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22104574.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To evaluate the dose-response relationship between cigarette smoking and pancreatic cancer and to examine the effects of temporal variables. METHODS: We analyzed data from 12 case-control studies within the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4), including 6507 pancreatic cases and 12 890 controls. We estimated summary odds ratios (ORs) by pooling study-specific ORs using random-effects models. RESULTS: Compared with never smokers, the OR was 1.2 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3) for former smokers and 2.2 (95% CI 1.7-2.8) for current cigarette smokers, with a significant increasing trend in risk with increasing number of cigarettes among current smokers (OR=3.4 for ≥35 cigarettes per day, P for trend<0.0001). Risk increased in relation to duration of cigarette smoking up to 40 years of smoking (OR=2.4). No trend in risk was observed for age at starting cigarette smoking, whereas risk decreased with increasing time since cigarette cessation, the OR being 0.98 after 20 years. CONCLUSIONS: This uniquely large pooled analysis confirms that current cigarette smoking is associated with a twofold increased risk of pancreatic cancer and that the risk increases with the number of cigarettes smoked and duration of smoking. Risk of pancreatic cancer reaches the level of never smokers ∼20 years after quitting.

5 Article Alcohol consumption and pancreatic cancer: a pooled analysis in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium (PanC4). 2012

Lucenteforte, E / La Vecchia, C / Silverman, D / Petersen, G M / Bracci, P M / Ji, B T / Bosetti, C / Li, D / Gallinger, S / Miller, A B / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Talamini, R / Polesel, J / Ghadirian, P / Baghurst, P A / Zatonski, W / Fontham, E / Bamlet, W R / Holly, E A / Gao, Y T / Negri, E / Hassan, M / Cotterchio, M / Su, J / Maisonneuve, P / Boffetta, P / Duell, E J. ·Department of Epidemiology, Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri Milan, Milan, Italy. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21536662.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Heavy alcohol drinking has been related to pancreatic cancer, but the issue is still unsolved. METHODS: To evaluate the role of alcohol consumption in relation to pancreatic cancer, we conducted a pooled analysis of 10 case-control studies (5585 cases and 11,827 controls) participating in the International Pancreatic Cancer Case-Control Consortium. We computed pooled odds ratios (ORs) by estimating study-specific ORs adjusted for selected covariates and pooling them using random effects models. RESULTS: Compared with abstainers and occasional drinkers (< 1 drink per day), we observed no association for light-to-moderate alcohol consumption (≤ 4 drinks per day) and pancreatic cancer risk; however, associations were above unity for higher consumption levels (OR = 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.2-2.2 for subjects drinking ≥ 9 drinks per day). Results did not change substantially when we evaluated associations by tobacco smoking status, or when we excluded participants who reported a history of pancreatitis, or participants whose data were based upon proxy responses. Further, no notable differences in pooled risk estimates emerged across strata of sex, age, race, study type, and study area. CONCLUSION: This collaborative-pooled analysis provides additional evidence for a positive association between heavy alcohol consumption and the risk of pancreatic cancer.

6 Article Body mass index, effect modifiers, and risk of pancreatic cancer: a pooled study of seven prospective cohorts. 2010

Jiao, Li / Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy / Hartge, Patricia / Pfeiffer, Ruth M / Park, Yikyung / Freedman, D Michal / Gail, Mitchell H / Alavanja, Michael C R / Albanes, Demetrius / Beane Freeman, Laura E / Chow, Wong-Ho / Huang, Wen-Yi / Hayes, Richard B / Hoppin, Jane A / Ji, Bu-Tian / Leitzmann, Michael F / Linet, Martha S / Meinhold, Cari L / Schairer, Catherine / Schatzkin, Arthur / Virtamo, Jarmo / Weinstein, Stephanie J / Zheng, Wei / Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA. jiao@bcm.edu ·Cancer Causes Control · Pubmed #20383573.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the positive association of body mass index (BMI, kg/m(2)) with risk of pancreatic cancer is modified by age, sex, smoking status, physical activity, and history of diabetes. METHODS: In a pooled analysis of primary data of seven prospective cohorts including 458,070 men and 485,689 women, we identified 2,454 patients with incident pancreatic cancer during an average 6.9 years of follow-up. Cox proportional hazard regression models were used in data analysis. RESULTS: In a random-effects meta-analysis, for every 5 kg/m(2) increment in BMI, the summary relative risk (RR) was 1.06 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.99-1.13) for men and 1.12 (95% CI 1.05-1.19) for women. The aggregate analysis showed that compared with normal weight (BMI: 18.5 to <25), the adjusted RR was 1.13 (95% CI 1.03-1.23) for overweight (BMI: 25 to <30) and 1.19 (95% CI 1.05-1.35) for obesity class I (BMI: 30 to <35). Tests of interactions of BMI effects by other risk factors were not statistically significant. Every 5 kg/m(2) increment in BMI was associated with an increased risk of pancreatic cancer among never and former smokers, but not among current smokers (P-interaction = 0.08). CONCLUSION: The present evidence suggests that a high BMI is an independent risk factor of pancreatic cancer.