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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Kartik S. Jhaveri
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Kartik Jhaveri wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Management and surveillance of non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: Retrospective review. 2019

Yohanathan, Lavanya / Dossa, Fahima / St Germain, Amelie Tremblay / Golbafian, Faegheh / Moulton, Carol-Anne / McGilvray, Ian D / Greig, Paul D / Serra, Stefano / Wei, Alice C / Jhaveri, Kartik S / Gallinger, Steve / Cleary, Sean P. ·Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA. · Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Surgery, Hotel-Dieu De Levis, Levis, QC, Canada. · Department of Family Medicine, London, ON, Canada. · Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Department of Pathology, University Health Network/University of Toronto, Canada. · Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Joint Department of Medical Imaging, University Health Network, Mount Sinai Hospital and Women's College Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Division of General Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; Department of Surgery, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. Electronic address: cleary.sean@mayo.edu. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #30803874.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: /Objective. To determine the outcomes of a non-operative management approach for sporadic, small, non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. METHODS: A retrospective chart review of patients with non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours initially managed non-operatively at a single institution was performed. Patients were identified through a search of radiologic reports, and individuals with ≥2 cross-sectional imaging studies performed >6 months apart from Jan. 1, 2000 to Dec. 31, 2013 were included. Data on tumour size, radiologic characteristics at diagnosis, interval radiologic growth, and surgical outcomes were recorded. RESULTS: Over the thirteen-year study period, 95 patients met inclusion criteria and were followed radiologically for a median of 36 months (18-69 months). Median initial tumour size on first imaging was 14.0 mm (IQR 10-19 mm). Median overall tumour growth rate was 0.03 mm/month (IQR: 0.00-0.14 mm/month). There was no significant relationship between initial tumour size and growth rate for tumours ≤ 2 cm or for lesions between 2 and 4 cm. Thirteen (14%) patients initially managed non-operatively underwent resection during the follow-up period. Reasons for surgery included interval tumour growth, patient anxiety or preference, or diagnostic uncertainty. Median time to surgery was 14 months (IQR 8-19 months). No patients progressed beyond resectability or developed metastatic disease during the observation period. CONCLUSION: For patients with sporadic, small, non-functional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours, radiologic surveillance appears to be a safe initial approach to management.

2 Article Screening for pancreatic cancer in a high-risk cohort: an eight-year experience. 2012

Al-Sukhni, Wigdan / Borgida, Ayelet / Rothenmund, Heidi / Holter, Spring / Semotiuk, Kara / Grant, Robert / Wilson, Stephanie / Moore, Malcolm / Narod, Steven / Jhaveri, Kartik / Haider, Masoom A / Gallinger, Steven. ·Hepatobiliary/Pancreatic Surgical Oncology Program, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada. ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #22127781.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer death. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was undertaken between 2003 and 2011 at a tertiary care centre in Toronto, Canada. Two hundred and sixty-two subjects were enrolled based on an elevated estimated lifetime risk for pancreatic cancer due to known genetic mutations and/or cancer family history. Subjects underwent annual magnetic resonance imaging, followed by additional investigations if abnormal findings were detected. Evidence of malignancy or suspicious macroscopic abnormalities prompted referral for surgical intervention. RESULTS: Average length of follow-up was 4.2 years, during which 84/262 (32%) subjects demonstrated pancreatic abnormalities. Three participants developed pancreatic adenocarcinoma (one 1.5-cm tumor was resected but recurred, while the other two subjects developed metastatic cancer), and a fourth participant developed a pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor that was resected. Fifteen subjects had radiologic evidence of branch-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, of which two underwent surgical resection. Sixty-five subjects had simple pancreatic cysts that have remained stable. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging can detect small pancreatic tumors and cystic lesions, but further improvement in sensitivity is needed. An understanding of the natural history of pre-invasive lesions in members of high-risk families is necessary for developing a more effective screening program.