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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Benny Vittrup Jensen
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, B. V. Jensen wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Prognostic impact of Charlson's Age-Comorbidity Index and other risk factors in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2020

Bagni, Karin / Chen, Inna M / Johansen, Astrid Z / Dehlendorff, Christian / Jensen, Benny V / Hansen, Carsten P / Preus Hasselby, Jane / Holländer, Niels H / Nissen, Mette / Bjerregaard, Jon K / Pfeiffer, Per / Yilmaz, Mette K / Rasmussen, Louise S / Nielsen, Svend E / Johansen, Julia S. ·Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Medicine, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Statistics and Pharmacoepidemiology, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology at, Zealand University Hospital, Naestved, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Oncology and Palliative Care, North Zealand University Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) · Pubmed #31908093.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Few studies have evaluated the impact of risk factors and comorbidity on overall survival (OS) in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The aim was to investigate the prognostic importance of Charlson's age-comorbidity index (CACI) and other risk factors on prognosis in a clinical real-world cohort of PDAC patients. METHODS: A total of 1,159 patients with PDAC who had received at least one cycle of adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy were included from the Danish BIOPAC study. We analysed OS according to CACI, tobacco smoking, alcohol intake, performance status (PS), BMI and diabetes. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated for OS using Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: At the end of follow-up, 994 (86%) patients had died. The median OS was 298 days for all patients (range 3-3010) and shortest in patients with stage IV. No association with short OS was seen for CACI > 2, diabetes, alcohol abuse, tobacco smoking, hypertension, and high BMI. Multivariate analysis showed that stage (IV vs. I: HR = 9.05, 95% CI 5.17-15.84), PS (2 vs. 0: HR = 3.67, 2.92-4.61) and treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (yes vs. no: HR = 1.31, 1.06-1.61) were independent negative prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS: We found that CACI, diabetes, tobacco smoking, alcohol abuse, hypertension, and high BMI were not associated with OS in a real-world cohort of patients with PDAC treated with chemotherapy. Only stage and PS were prognostic parameters.

2 Article Clinical value of serum hyaluronan and propeptide of type III collagen in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2019

Chen, Inna M / Willumsen, Nicholas / Dehlendorff, Christian / Johansen, Astrid Z / Jensen, Benny V / Hansen, Carsten P / Hasselby, Jane P / Bojesen, Stig E / Pfeiffer, Per / Nielsen, Svend E / Holländer, Niels H / Yilmaz, Mette K / Karsdal, Morten / Johansen, Julia S. ·Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. · Nordic Bioscience A/S, Herlev, Denmark. · Unit of Statistics and Pharmacoepidemiology, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Pathology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, North Zealand University Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Zealand University Hospital, Naestved, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Medicine, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #31642523.

ABSTRACT: Hyaluronan (HA) and collagen are highly expressed in pancreatic cancer (PC) stroma. HA and collagen accumulation increase tumor interstitial fluid pressure, compromising blood flow and drug penetration. The aim of this biomarker study was to determine the clinical utility of serum HA and the propeptide of type III collagen (PRO-C3) in patients with PC. A cohort from the Danish BIOPAC study (NCT03311776) including patients with histologically confirmed pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (n = 809), ampullary carcinoma (n = 44), distal biliary tract cancer (n = 31), chronic pancreatitis (n = 15), intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (n = 41), duodenal adenoma (n = 7) and no cancer (n = 25). Healthy controls were available for serum HA (n = 141) and PRO-C3 (n = 8). The main outcome was overall survival (OS) of patients with PC in relation to pretreatment serum HA and PRO-C3 levels. Patients with PC had higher baseline serum HA and PRO-C3 than healthy subjects and patients with benign conditions. Pretreatment serum baseline HA and PRO-C3 in patients with PC were associated with poorer survival and PRO-C3 remained prognostic also after adjusting for age, performance status, stage, the presence of liver and peritoneum metastasis, and CA19-9. Detection of HA and PRO-C3 may be useful in differentiating between malignant and benign pancreatic conditions. Serum HA and PRO-C3 were prognostic for OS in patients with PC.

3 Article Germline BRCA2 K3326X and CHEK2 I157T mutations increase risk for sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2019

Obazee, O / Archibugi, L / Andriulli, A / Soucek, P / Małecka-Panas, E / Ivanauskas, A / Johnson, T / Gazouli, M / Pausch, T / Lawlor, R T / Cavestro, G M / Milanetto, A C / Di Leo, M / Pasquali, C / Hegyi, P / Szentesi, A / Radu, C E / Gheorghe, C / Theodoropoulos, G E / Bergmann, F / Brenner, H / Vodickova, L / Katzke, V / Campa, D / Strobel, O / Kaiser, J / Pezzilli, R / Federici, F / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, B / Boggi, U / Lemstrova, R / Johansen, J S / Bojesen, S E / Chen, I / Jensen, B V / Capurso, G / Pazienza, V / Dervenis, C / Sperti, C / Mambrini, A / Hackert, T / Kaaks, R / Basso, D / Talar-Wojnarowska, R / Maiello, E / Izbicki, J R / Cuk, K / Saum, K U / Cantore, M / Kupcinskas, J / Palmieri, O / Delle Fave, G / Landi, S / Salvia, R / Fogar, P / Vashist, Y K / Scarpa, A / Vodicka, P / Tjaden, C / Iskierka-Jazdzewska, E / Canzian, F. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Pancreatic Disorders Clinic, S. Andrea Hospital, University of Sapienza, Rome, Italy. · Pancreatico/Biliary Endoscopy and Endosonography Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Oncology, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Centre, Faculty of Medicine in Plzen, Charles University in Prague, Plzen, Czech Republic. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Heidelberg, Germany. · ARC-Net, Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology -DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine and 1st Department of Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · Fundeni Clinical Institute, Bucharest, Romania. · First Propaedeutic Surgical Department, "Hippocratio" General Hospital Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Pathologisches Institut der Universität Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague and Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Dipartimento di Biologia, Università di Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Massa Carrara Oncological, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgery, Konstantopouleion General Hospital of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Section for Visceral Surgery, Department of Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague and Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Hematology, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30672594.

ABSTRACT: Rare truncating BRCA2 K3326X (rs11571833) and pathogenic CHEK2 I157T (rs17879961) variants have previously been implicated in familial pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but not in sporadic cases. The effect of both mutations in important DNA repair genes on sporadic PDAC risk may shed light on the genetic architecture of this disease. Both mutations were genotyped in germline DNA from 2,935 sporadic PDAC cases and 5,626 control subjects within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. Risk estimates were evaluated using multivariate unconditional logistic regression with adjustment for possible confounders such as sex, age and country of origin. Statistical analyses were two-sided with p values <0.05 considered significant. K3326X and I157T were associated with increased risk of developing sporadic PDAC (odds ratio (OR

4 Article The potential diagnostic value of serum microRNA signature in patients with pancreatic cancer. 2016

Johansen, Julia S / Calatayud, Dan / Albieri, Vanna / Schultz, Nicolai A / Dehlendorff, Christian / Werner, Jens / Jensen, Benny V / Pfeiffer, Per / Bojesen, Stig E / Giese, Nathalia / Nielsen, Kaspar R / Nielsen, Svend E / Yilmaz, Mette / Holländer, Niels H / Andersen, Klaus K. ·Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk. · Department of Medicine, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Transplantation, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Denmark. · Department of General, Visceral, and Transplant Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. · Odense University Hospital, Germany. · Department of Oncology, Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Immunology, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Hillerød Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aalborg University Hospital, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Naestved Hospital, Denmark. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #27464352.

ABSTRACT: Biomarkers for early diagnosis of patients with pancreatic cancer (PC) are needed. Our aim was to identify panels of miRNAs in serum in combination with CA 19-9 for use in the diagnosis of PC. Four hundred seventeen patients with PC were included prospectively from Denmark (n = 306) and Germany (n = 111). Controls included 59 patients with chronic pancreatitis (CP) and 248 healthy subjects (HS). MiRNAs were analyzed in pretreatment serum samples from 3 cohorts: discovery cohort (754 human miRNAs, TaqMan(®) Human MicroRNA assay, Applied Biosystem; PC n = 133, controls n = 72); training cohort (34 miRNAs, real-time qPCR using the Fluidigm BioMark™ System; PC n = 198, controls n = 184); validation cohort (13 miRNAs, real-time qPCR using the Fluidigm BioMark™ System; PC n = 86, controls n = 51). We found that 34 miRNAs in serum from PC patients in the discovery cohort were expressed differently than in controls. These miRNAs were tested in the training cohort, and four diagnostic panels were constructed that included 5 or 12 miRNAs (miR-16, -18a, -20a, -24, -25, -27a, -29c, -30a.5p, -191, -323.3p, -345 and -483.5p). Diagnostic accuracy of detecting PC in the training cohort was AUC (Index I 0.85; II 0.87; III 0.85; IV 0.95; CA 19-9 0.93); specificity (I 0.71; II 0.76; III 0.66; IV 0.90 (fixed sensitivity at 0.85); CA 19-9 0.93). Combining serum CA 19-9 and Index II best discriminated Stages I and II PC from HS [AUC 0.93 (0.90-0.96), sensitivity 0.77 (0.69-0.84), specificity 0.94 (0.90-0.96) and accuracy 0.88 (0.84-0.91)]. In conclusion, we identified four diagnostic panels based on 5 or 12 miRNAs in serum that could distinguish patients with PC from HS and CP.

5 Article MicroRNA Expression in Formalin-fixed Paraffin-embedded Cancer Tissue: Identifying Reference MicroRNAs and Variability. 2015

Boisen, Mogens Karsbøl / Dehlendorff, Christian / Linnemann, Dorte / Schultz, Nicolai Aagaard / Jensen, Benny Vittrup / Høgdall, Estrid Vilma Solyom / Johansen, Julia Sidenius. ·Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730, Herlev, Denmark. Mogens.karsboel.boisen@regionh.dk. · Statistics, Bioinformatics and Registry, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark. chrdehl@cancer.dk. · Department of Pathology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. Dorte.Linnemann@regionh.dk. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Nicolai.Aagaard.Schultz.01@regionh.dk. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730, Herlev, Denmark. benny.vittrup.jensen@regionh.dk. · Department of Pathology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. Estrid.Hoegdall@regionh.dk. · Department of Oncology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730, Herlev, Denmark. julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk. · Department of Medicine, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev, Denmark. julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk. · Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. julia.johansen@post3.tele.dk. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #26714641.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Archival formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer tissue samples are a readily available resource for microRNA (miRNA) biomarker identification. No established standard for reference miRNAs in FFPE tissue exists. We sought to identify stable reference miRNAs for normalization of miRNA expression in FFPE tissue samples from patients with colorectal (CRC) and pancreatic (PC) cancer and to quantify the variability associated with sample age and fixation. METHODS: High-throughput miRNA profiling results from 203 CRC and 256 PC FFPE samples as well as from 37 paired frozen/FFPE samples from nine other CRC tumors (methodological samples) were used. Candidate reference miRNAs were identified by their correlation with global mean expression. The stability of reference genes was analyzed according to published methods. The association between sample age and global mean miRNA expression was tested using linear regression. Variability was described using correlation coefficients and linear mixed effects models. Normalization effects were determined by changes in standard deviation and by hierarchical clustering. RESULTS: We created lists of 20 miRNAs with the best correlation to global mean expression in each cancer type. Nine of these miRNAs were present in both lists, and miR-103a-3p was the most stable reference miRNA for both CRC and PC FFPE tissue. The optimal number of reference miRNAs was 4 in CRC and 10 in PC. Sample age had a significant effect on global miRNA expression in PC (50% reduction over 20 years) but not in CRC. Formalin fixation for 2-6 days decreased miRNA expression 30-65%. Normalization using global mean expression reduced variability for technical and biological replicates while normalization using the expression of the identified reference miRNAs reduced variability only for biological replicates. Normalization only had a minor impact on clustering results. CONCLUSIONS: We identified suitable reference miRNAs for future miRNA expression experiments using CRC- and PC FFPE tissue samples. Formalin fixation decreased miRNA expression considerably, while the effect of increasing sample age was estimated to be negligible in a clinical setting.

6 Article MicroRNA biomarkers in whole blood for detection of pancreatic cancer. 2014

Schultz, Nicolai A / Dehlendorff, Christian / Jensen, Benny V / Bjerregaard, Jon K / Nielsen, Kaspar R / Bojesen, Stig E / Calatayud, Dan / Nielsen, Svend E / Yilmaz, Mette / Holländer, Niels Henrik / Andersen, Klaus K / Johansen, Julia S. ·Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark2Department of Medicine, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark3Department of Gastroenterology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen Universit. · Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Immunology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Transplantation, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Hillerød Hospital, Hillerød, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aalborg University Hospital, Aalborg, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Næstved Hospital, Næstved, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark2Department of Medicine, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. ·JAMA · Pubmed #24449318.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: Biomarkers for the early diagnosis of patients with pancreatic cancer are needed to improve prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To describe differences in microRNA expression in whole blood between patients with pancreatic cancer, chronic pancreatitis, and healthy participants and to identify panels of microRNAs for use in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer compared with the cancer antigen 19-9 (CA19-9). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A case-control study that included 409 patients with pancreatic cancer and 25 with chronic pancreatitis who had been included prospectively in the Danish BIOPAC (Biomarkers in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer) study (July 2008-October 2012) plus 312 blood donors as healthy participants. The microRNA expressions in pretreatment whole blood RNA samples were collected and analyzed in 3 randomly determined subcohorts: discovery cohort (143 patients with pancreatic cancer, 18 patients with chronic pancreatitis, and 69 healthy participants), training cohort (180 patients with pancreatic cancer, 1 patient with chronic pancreatitis, and 199 healthy participants), and validation cohort (86 patients with pancreatic cancer, 7 patients with chronic pancreatitis, and 44 healthy participants); 754 microRNAs were screened in the discovery cohort and 38 microRNAs in the training cohort and 13 microRNAs in the validation cohort. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Identification of microRNA panels (classifiers) for diagnosing pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The discovery cohort demonstrated that 38 microRNAs in whole blood were significantly dysregulated in patients with pancreatic cancer compared with controls. These microRNAs were tested in the training cohort and 2 diagnostic panels were constructed comprising 4 microRNAs in index I (miR-145, miR-150, miR-223, miR-636) and 10 in index II (miR-26b, miR-34a, miR-122, miR-126*, miR-145, miR-150, miR-223, miR-505, miR-636, miR-885.5p). The test characteristics for the training cohort were index I area under the curve (AUC) of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.82-0.90), sensitivity of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79-0.90), and specificity of 0.64 (95% CI, 0.57-0.71); index II AUC of 0.93 (95% CI, 0.90-0.96), sensitivity of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79-0.90), and specificity of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.80-0.85); and CA19-9 AUC of 0.90 (95% CI, 0.87-0.94), sensitivity of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.80-0.90), and specificity of 0.99 (95% CI, 0.96-1.00). Performances were strengthened in the validation cohort by combining panels and CA19-9 (index I AUC of 0.94 [95% CI, 0.90-0.98] and index II AUC of 0.93 [95% CI, 0.89-0.97]). Compared with CA19-9 alone, the AUC for the combination of index I and CA19-9 was significantly higher (P = .01). The performance of the panels in patients with stage IA-IIB pancreatic cancer was index I AUC of 0.80 (95% CI, 0.73-0.87); index I and CA19-9 AUC of 0.83 (95% CI, 0.76-0.90); index II AUC of 0.91 (95% CI, 0.87-0.94); and index II and CA19-9 AUC of 0.91 (95% CI, 0.86-0.95). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This study identified 2 diagnostic panels based on microRNA expression in whole blood with the potential to distinguish patients with pancreatic cancer from healthy controls. Further research is necessary to understand whether these have clinical implications for early detection of pancreatic cancer and how much this information adds to serum CA19-9.

7 Article Diagnostic and Prognostic Impact of Circulating YKL-40, IL-6, and CA 19.9 in Patients with Pancreatic Cancer. 2013

Schultz, Nicolai A / Christensen, Ib J / Werner, Jens / Giese, Nathalia / Jensen, Benny V / Larsen, Ole / Bjerregaard, Jon K / Pfeiffer, Per / Calatayud, Dan / Nielsen, Svend E / Yilmaz, Mette K / Holländer, Niels H / Wøjdemann, Morten / Bojesen, Stig E / Nielsen, Kaspar R / Johansen, Julia S. ·Department of Surgical Gastroenterology and Transplantation, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark ; Department of Oncology Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Denmark ; Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev, Denmark ; Department of Medicine, Copenhagen University Hospital at Herlev, Herlev, Denmark. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #23840582.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: We tested the hypothesis that high plasma YKL-40 and IL-6 associate with pancreatic cancer and short overall survival. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In all, 559 patients with pancreatic cancer from prospective biomarker studies from Denmark (n = 448) and Germany (n = 111) were studied. Plasma YKL-40 and IL-6 were determined by ELISAs and serum CA 19.9 by chemiluminescent immunometric assay. RESULTS: Odds ratios (ORs) for prediction of pancreatic cancer were significant for all biomarkers, with CA 19.9 having the highest AUC (CA 19.9: OR = 2.28, 95% CI 1.97 to 2.68, p<0.0001, AUC = 0.94; YKL-40: OR = 4.50, 3.99 to 5.08, p<0.0001, AUC = 0.87; IL-6: OR = 3.68, 3.08 to 4.44, p<0.0001, AUC = 0.87). Multivariate Cox analysis (YKL-40, IL-6, CA 19.9, age, stage, gender) in patients operated on showed that high preoperative IL-6 and CA 19.9 (dichotomized according to normal values) were independently associated with short overall survival (CA 19.9: HR = 2.51, 1.22-5.15, p = 0.013; IL-6: HR = 2.03, 1.11 to 3.70, p = 0.021). Multivariate Cox analysis of non-operable patients (Stage IIB-IV) showed that high pre-treatment levels of each biomarker were independently associated with short overall survival (YKL-40: HR = 1.30, 1.03 to 1.64, p = 0.029; IL-6: HR = 1.71, 1.33 to 2.20, p<0.0001; CA 19.9: HR = 1.54, 1.06 to 2.24, p = 0.022). Patients with preoperative elevation of both IL-6 and CA 19.9 had shorter overall survival (p<0.005) compared to patients with normal levels of both biomarkers (45% vs. 92% alive after 12 months). CONCLUSIONS: Plasma YKL-40 and IL-6 had less diagnostic impact than CA 19.9. Combination of pretreatment YKL-40, IL-6, and CA 19.9 may have clinical value to identify pancreatic cancer patients with the poorest prognosis.

8 Article [Oncological treatment of patients with pancreatic cancer]. 2010

Ladekarl, Morten / Jensen, Benny Vittrup / Pfeiffer, Per. ·Onkologisk Afdeling D, Arhus Sygehus, 8000 Arhus C, Denmark. mortlade@rm.dk ·Ugeskr Laeger · Pubmed #20444408.

ABSTRACT: Only radical resection can cure patients with pancreatic cancer (PC); however, adjuvant gemcitabine (GEM) doubles the postoperative five-year-survival. The best treatment of locally advanced PC is not established, but radio-chemotherapy followed by surgery may be considered. Fit patients with metastatic PC benefit from GEM, which is standard. The addition of the epidermal growth factor-receptor-inhibitor erlotinib prolongs median survival significantly by two weeks and one-year survival by 7%. Very fit patients might benefit by combining GEM with platinum or capecitabine, but evidence is not firm. Participation in clinical trials is strongly encouraged in PC.