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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jakob Robert Izbicki
Based on 55 articles published since 2009
(Why 55 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, J. Izbicki wrote the following 55 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3
1 Guideline Definition of a standard lymphadenectomy in surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: a consensus statement by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Tol, Johanna A M G / Gouma, Dirk J / Bassi, Claudio / Dervenis, Christos / Montorsi, Marco / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Büchler, Markus W / Conlon, Kevin C / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Fingerhut, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Hartwig, Werner / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milicevic, Miroslav N / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vollmer, Charles M / Yeo, Charles J / Charnley, Richard M / Anonymous3050801. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: D.J.Gouma@amc.nl. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Digestive Surgery, Hippokrateon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Section for Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Penn Medicine, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. ·Surgery · Pubmed #25061003.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The lymph node (Ln) status of patients with resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an important predictor of survival. The survival benefit of extended lymphadenectomy during pancreatectomy is, however, disputed, and there is no true definition of the optimal extent of the lymphadenectomy. The aim of this study was to formulate a definition for standard lymphadenectomy during pancreatectomy. METHODS: During a consensus meeting of the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery, pancreatic surgeons formulated a consensus statement based on available literature and their experience. RESULTS: The nomenclature of the Japanese Pancreas Society was accepted by all participants. Extended lymphadenectomy during pancreatoduodenectomy with resection of Ln's along the left side of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and around the celiac trunk, splenic artery, or left gastric artery showed no survival benefit compared with a standard lymphadenectomy. No level I evidence was available on prognostic impact of positive para-aortic Ln's. Consensus was reached on selectively removing suspected Ln's outside the resection area for frozen section. No consensus was reached on continuing or terminating resection in cases where these nodes were positive. CONCLUSION: Extended lymphadenectomy cannot be recommended. Standard lymphadenectomy for pancreatoduodenectomy should strive to resect Ln stations no. 5, 6, 8a, 12b1, 12b2, 12c, 13a, 13b, 14a, 14b, 17a, and 17b. For cancers of the body and tail of the pancreas, removal of stations 10, 11, and 18 is standard. Furthermore, lymphadenectomy is important for adequate nodal staging. Both pancreatic resection in relatively fit patients or nonresectional palliative treatment were accepted as acceptable treatment in cases of positive Ln's outside the resection plane. This consensus statement could serve as a guide for surgeons and researchers in future directives and new clinical studies.

2 Guideline Extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: definition and consensus of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Hartwig, Werner / Vollmer, Charles M / Fingerhut, Abe / Yeo, Charles J / Neoptolemos, John P / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Bockhorn, Max / Charnley, Richard / Conlon, Kevin C / Dervenis, Christos / Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Imrie, Clem W / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milićević, Miroslav N / Montorsi, Marco / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vashist, Yogesh K / Izbicki, Jakob R / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous1520795. ·Department of Surgery, Klinikum Großhadern, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: markus.buechler@med.uni-heidelberg.de. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856668.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Complete macroscopic tumor resection is one of the most relevant predictors of long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because locally advanced pancreatic tumors can involve adjacent organs, "extended" pancreatectomy that includes the resection of additional organs may be needed to achieve this goal. Our aim was to develop a common consistent terminology to be used in centers reporting results of pancreatic resections for cancer. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers reviewed the literature on extended pancreatectomies and worked together to establish a consensus on the definition and the role of extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Macroscopic (R1) and microscopic (R0) complete tumor resection can be achieved in patients with locally advanced disease by extended pancreatectomy. Operative time, blood loss, need for blood transfusions, duration of stay in the intensive care unit, and hospital morbidity, and possibly also perioperative mortality are increased with extended resections. Long-term survival is similar compared with standard resections but appears to be better compared with bypass surgery or nonsurgical palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. It was not possible to identify any clear prognostic criteria based on the specific additional organ resected. CONCLUSION: Despite increased perioperative morbidity, extended pancreatectomy is warranted in locally advanced disease to achieve long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma if macroscopic clearance can be achieved. Definitions of extended pancreatectomies for locally advanced disease (and not distant metastatic disease) are established that are crucial for comparison of results of future trials across different practices and countries, in particular for those using neoadjuvant therapy.

3 Guideline Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Bockhorn, Maximilian / Uzunoglu, Faik G / Adham, Mustapha / Imrie, Clem / Milicevic, Miroslav / Sandberg, Aken A / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Büchler, Markus / Charnley, Richard M / Conlon, Kevin / Cruz, Laureano Fernandez / Dervenis, Christos / Fingerhutt, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Hartwig, Werner / Lillemoe, Keith D / Montorsi, Marco / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Takaori, Kyoichi / Traverso, William / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vollmer, Charles / Yeo, Charles J / Izbicki, Jakob R / Anonymous1510795. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · St. Luke's Clinic - Center For Pancreatic and Liver Diseases, Boise, ID. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: izbicki@uke.de. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856119.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This position statement was developed to expedite a consensus on definition and treatment for borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BRPC) that would have worldwide acceptability. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons from well-established, high-volume centers collaborated on a literature review and development of consensus on issues related to borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) supports the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for the definition of BRPC. Current evidence supports operative exploration and resection in the case of involvement of the mesentericoportal venous axis; in addition, a new classification of extrahepatic mesentericoportal venous resections is proposed by the ISGPS. Suspicion of arterial involvement should lead to exploration to confirm the imaging-based findings. Formal arterial resections are not recommended; however, in exceptional circumstances, individual therapeutic approaches may be evaluated under experimental protocols. The ISGPS endorses the recommendations for specimen examination and the definition of an R1 resection (tumor within 1 mm from the margin) used by the British Royal College of Pathologists. Standard preoperative diagnostics for BRPC may include: (1) serum levels of CA19-9, because CA19-9 levels predict survival in large retrospective series; and also (2) the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio because of the prognostic relevance of the systemic inflammatory response. Various regimens of neoadjuvant therapy are recommended only in the setting of prospective trials at high-volume centers. CONCLUSION: Current evidence justifies portomesenteric venous resection in patients with BRPC. Basic definitions were identified, that are currently lacking but that are needed to obtain further evidence and improvement for this important patient subgroup. A consensus for each topic is given.

4 Guideline [S3-guideline exocrine pancreatic cancer]. 2013

Seufferlein, T / Porzner, M / Becker, T / Budach, V / Ceyhan, G / Esposito, I / Fietkau, R / Follmann, M / Friess, H / Galle, P / Geissler, M / Glanemann, M / Gress, T / Heinemann, V / Hohenberger, W / Hopt, U / Izbicki, J / Klar, E / Kleeff, J / Kopp, I / Kullmann, F / Langer, T / Langrehr, J / Lerch, M / Löhr, M / Lüttges, J / Lutz, M / Mayerle, J / Michl, P / Möller, P / Molls, M / Münter, M / Nothacker, M / Oettle, H / Post, S / Reinacher-Schick, A / Röcken, C / Roeb, E / Saeger, H / Schmid, R / Schmiegel, W / Schoenberg, M / Siveke, J / Stuschke, M / Tannapfel, A / Uhl, W / Unverzagt, S / van Oorschot, B / Vashist, Y / Werner, J / Yekebas, E / Anonymous230779 / Anonymous240779 / Anonymous250779. ·Klinik für Innere Medizin I, Universitätsklinikum Ulm. · Klinik für Allgemeine Chirurgie, Viszeral-, Thorax-, Transplantations- und Kinderchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Kiel. · Klinik für Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin. · Chirurgische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Institut für Allgemeine Pathologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Strahlenklinik, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen. · Leitlinienprogramm Onkologie, Deutsche Krebsgesellschaft e. V., Berlin. · I. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Universitätsmedizin Mainz. · Klinik für Allgemeine Innere Medizin, Onkologie/Hämatologie, Gastroenterologie und Infektiologie, Klinikum Esslingen. · Klinik für Allgemeine Chirurgie, Viszeral-, Gefäß- und Kinderchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum des Saarlandes Homburg/Saar. · Klinik für Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie und Stoffwechsel, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg. · Medizinischen Klinik und Poliklinik III, Klinikum der Universität München LMU. · Chirurgische Klinik, Universitätsklinikum Erlangen. · Klinik für Allgemein- und Viszeralchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Freiburg. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Thoraxchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf. · Klinik für Allgemeine Chirurgie, Thorax-, Gefäß- und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitätsmedizin Rostock. · AWMF-Institut für Medizinisches Wissensmanagement, Marburg. · Medizinische Klinik I, Klinikum Weiden. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Gefäß- und Viszeralchirurgie, Martin-Luther-Krankenhaus Berlin. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Innere Medizin A, Universitätsmedizin Greifswald. · Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm. · Institut für Pathologie, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg. · Medizinische Klinik - Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie, Endokrinologie, Infektiologie, Caritasklinikum Saarbrücken. · Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsklinikum Ulm. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Klinik für Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Klinikum Stuttgart. · AWMF-Institut für Medizinisches Wissensmanagement, Berlin. · Medizinische Klinik mit Schwerpunkt Hämatologie und Onkologie, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin. · Chirurgische Klinik, Universitätsmedizin Mannheim. · Abt. für Hämatologie und Onkologie, St. Josef-Hospital, Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Institut für Pathologie, Universitätsklinikum Kiel. · Medizinische Klinik II, SP Gastroenterologie, Universitätsklinikum Gießen und Marburg. · Klinik für Viszeral-, Thorax- und Gefäßchirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Dresden. · II. Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, TU München. · Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Klinik für Chirurgie, Rotkreuzklinikum München. · Klinik für Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikum Essen. · Institut für Pathologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Chirurgische Klinik, St. Josef-Hospital, Klinikum der Ruhr-Universität Bochum. · Institut für Medizinische Epidemiologie, Biometrie und Informatik, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg. · Klinik und Poliklinik für Strahlentherapie, Universitätsklinikum Würzburg. · Klinik für Allgemeine, Viszerale und Transplantationschirurgie, Universitätsklinikum Heidelberg. · Klinik für Allgemein-, Thorax- und Viszeralchirurgie, Klinikum Darmstadt. ·Z Gastroenterol · Pubmed #24338757.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Incidental Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm, Cystic or Premalignant Lesions of the Pancreas: The Case for Aggressive Management. 2018

El Gammal, Alexander T / Izbicki, Jakob R. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 5220246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 5220246, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: izbicki@uke.de. ·Surg Clin North Am · Pubmed #29191271.

ABSTRACT: Incidental cystic intrapancreatic lesions are daily findings in abdominal radiology. The discovery of incidental pancreatic lesions is increasingly common with technologic diagnostic advancements. This article provides a perspective and guideline on the clinical management of incidental intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms and cystic or premalignant lesions of the pancreas.

6 Review Definition and classification of chyle leak after pancreatic operation: A consensus statement by the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery. 2017

Besselink, Marc G / van Rijssen, L Bengt / Bassi, Claudio / Dervenis, Christos / Montorsi, Marco / Adham, Mustapha / Asbun, Horacio J / Bockhorn, Maximillian / Strobel, Oliver / Büchler, Markus W / Busch, Olivier R / Charnley, Richard M / Conlon, Kevin C / Fernández-Cruz, Laureano / Fingerhut, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Neoptolemos, John P / Sarr, Michael G / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Sitarz, Robert / Vollmer, Charles M / Yeo, Charles J / Hartwig, Werner / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Gouma, Dirk J / Anonymous2270883. ·Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.g.besselink@amc.nl. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Humanitas Research Hospital and University, Milan, Italy. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, HCL, UCBL1, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of General-, Visceral-, and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Digestive Surgery, Hippokrateon Hospital, University of Athens, Athens, Greece; Section for Surgical Research, Department of Surgery, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and the Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Division of Subspecialty General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of GI and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Medical University in Lublin, Poland. · Department of Surgery, Penn Medicine, The University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Division of Pancreatic Surgery, Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, Ludwig Maximilians University, University of Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD. ·Surgery · Pubmed #27692778.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Recent literature suggests that chyle leak may complicate up to 10% of pancreatic resections. Treatment depends on its severity, which may include chylous ascites. No international consensus definition or grading system of chyle leak currently is available. METHODS: The International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery, an international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers, reviewed the literature and worked together to establish a consensus on the definition and classification of chyle leak after pancreatic operation. RESULTS: Chyle leak was defined as output of milky-colored fluid from a drain, drain site, or wound on or after postoperative day 3, with a triglyceride content ≥110 mg/dL (≥1.2 mmol/L). Three different grades of severity were defined according to the management needed: grade A, no specific intervention other than oral dietary restrictions; grade B, prolongation of hospital stay, nasoenteral nutrition with dietary restriction, total parenteral nutrition, octreotide, maintenance of surgical drains, or placement of new percutaneous drains; and grade C, need for other more invasive in-hospital treatment, intensive care unit admission, or mortality. CONCLUSION: This classification and grading system for chyle leak after pancreatic resection allows for comparison of outcomes between series. As with the other the International Study Group on Pancreatic Surgery consensus statements, this classification should facilitate communication and evaluation of different approaches to the prevention and treatment of this complication.

7 Review Pancreatic cancer and liver metastases: state of the art. 2016

Bellon, Eugen / Gebauer, Florian / Tachezy, Michael / Izbicki, Jakob R / Bockhorn, Maximilian. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic SurgeryUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20249, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic SurgeryUniversity Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20249, Hamburg, Germany. M.bockhorn@uke.de. ·Updates Surg · Pubmed #27832445.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is still one of the most aggressive oncological diseases with a 5-year mortality rate below 10%. Surgery remains the only curative treatment; however, most patients present with late-stage disease deemed unresectable, either due to extensive local vascular involvement or the presence of distant metastasis. In the detection of hepatic metastases, the current standard is palliative chemotherapy with fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) or nab-paclitaxel with gemcitabine. Once hepatic metastases are diagnosed, the guidelines do not recommend resection of the primary tumor. Recent findings suggest that some patients with non-resectable diseases initially have survival rates as good as those with initially resectable disease when they are able to undergo surgical resection. Synchronous resection of both the primary tumour as well as the liver metastases may be beneficial and improves the outcome.

8 Review Limits of surgery for pancreatic cancer. 2014

Nentwich, M F / König, A / Izbicki, J R. · ·Rozhl Chir · Pubmed #25301342.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer patients often present in an already advanced state of disease and the therapeutic approach is an interdisciplinary challenge. Surgery is an integral part in a potentially curative setting, yet in such advanced disease surgery can reach its limits. The technical feasibility has to be weighted against potential harms and the oncological reasonableness. In locally advanced disease, limits of surgery could be pushed as evidence grew. A venous vascular tumor infiltration nowadays does not preclude patients from surgery, as venous resections can be safely performed and survival rates are not inferior to patients with standard resections. Multivisceral resections have an increased risk of morbidity and mortality, but can improve overall survival. The resection and reconstruction of tumor infiltrated arteries is technically feasible, but these procedures have a high rate of associated morbidity and mortality with an unclear oncological benefit and therefore are generally not recommended. This also holds true for intentional palliative R2-resections, which do not offer a survival benefit but decrease the quality of life and have higher morbidity and mortality rates than palliative bypass procedures. A synchronous resection of the primary tumor and intraabdominal metastases in an olgiometastatic disease only offers a questionable oncological benefit and the evidence for this approach is scarce. Therefore, surgery in a metastatic disease is generally not recommended and has to be discussed interdisciplinary on a highly individual basis.Key words: pancreatic cancer multivisceral resection staging.

9 Review Surgery for advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer--current state and trends. 2012

Nentwich, Michael F / Bockhorn, Maximilian / König, Alexandra / Izbicki, Jakob R / Cataldegirmen, Güllü. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246 Hamburg, Germany. m.nentwich@uke.uni-hamburg.de ·Anticancer Res · Pubmed #22593478.

ABSTRACT: Due to the late onset of symptoms in pancreatic cancer, patients are often presented with an already advanced or metastatic state of disease. Only in a minority of patients is a tumor resection indicated, e.g. in general tumor encasement of major vessels, while the presence of metastatic disease excludes patients from curative-intended surgery. Limitations for pancreatic resections have been debated and re-thought after more experience has gained over time. This holds true for en-bloc vascular resections, total pancreatectomies, intentional R2 pancreatic resections and synchronous resection of liver metastases. These issues are addressed in this review.

10 Clinical Trial Comparison of adjuvant gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer (ESPAC-4): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial. 2017

Neoptolemos, John P / Palmer, Daniel H / Ghaneh, Paula / Psarelli, Eftychia E / Valle, Juan W / Halloran, Christopher M / Faluyi, Olusola / O'Reilly, Derek A / Cunningham, David / Wadsley, Jonathan / Darby, Suzanne / Meyer, Tim / Gillmore, Roopinder / Anthoney, Alan / Lind, Pehr / Glimelius, Bengt / Falk, Stephen / Izbicki, Jakob R / Middleton, Gary William / Cummins, Sebastian / Ross, Paul J / Wasan, Harpreet / McDonald, Alec / Crosby, Tom / Ma, Yuk Ting / Patel, Kinnari / Sherriff, David / Soomal, Rubin / Borg, David / Sothi, Sharmila / Hammel, Pascal / Hackert, Thilo / Jackson, Richard / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous2721324. ·University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Research Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden. · University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. · Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, Bristol, UK. · University of Hamburg Medical institutions UKE, Hamburg, Germany. · Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, UK. · Guy's Hospital, London, UK. · Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK. · Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK. · Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich, UK. · Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · University Hospital Coventry, Coventry, UK. · Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France. · University of Heidelberg, Germany. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28129987.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ESPAC-3 trial showed that adjuvant gemcitabine is the standard of care based on similar survival to and less toxicity than adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Other clinical trials have shown better survival and tumour response with gemcitabine and capecitabine than with gemcitabine alone in advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine and capecitabine compared with gemcitabine monotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We did a phase 3, two-group, open-label, multicentre, randomised clinical trial at 92 hospitals in England, Scotland, Wales, Germany, France, and Sweden. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older and had undergone complete macroscopic resection for ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (R0 or R1 resection). We randomly assigned patients (1:1) within 12 weeks of surgery to receive six cycles of either 1000 mg/m FINDINGS: Of 732 patients enrolled, 730 were included in the final analysis. Of these, 366 were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine and 364 to gemcitabine plus capecitabine. The Independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee requested reporting of the results after there were 458 (95%) of a target of 480 deaths. The median overall survival for patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group was 28·0 months (95% CI 23·5-31·5) compared with 25·5 months (22·7-27·9) in the gemcitabine group (hazard ratio 0·82 [95% CI 0·68-0·98], p=0·032). 608 grade 3-4 adverse events were reported by 226 of 359 patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group compared with 481 grade 3-4 adverse events in 196 of 366 patients in the gemcitabine group. INTERPRETATION: The adjuvant combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine should be the new standard of care following resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK.

11 Clinical Trial Sequential neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) followed by curative surgery vs. primary surgery alone for resectable, non-metastasized pancreatic adenocarcinoma: NEOPA- a randomized multicenter phase III study (NCT01900327, DRKS00003893, ISRCTN82191749). 2014

Tachezy, Michael / Gebauer, Florian / Petersen, Cordula / Arnold, Dirk / Trepel, Martin / Wegscheider, Karl / Schafhausen, Phillipe / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Izbicki, Jakob Robert / Yekebas, Emre. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf, Martinistr, 52, Hamburg 20246, Germany. izbicki@uke.de. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #24906700.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Median OS after surgery in curative intent for non-metastasized pancreas cancer ranges under study conditions from 17.9 months to 23.6 months. Tumor recurrence occurs locally, at distant sites (liver, peritoneum, lungs), or both. Observational and autopsy series report local recurrence rates of up to 87% even after potentially "curative" R0 resection. To achieve better local control, neoadjuvant CRT has been suggested for preoperative tumour downsizing, to elevate the likelihood of curative, margin-negative R0 resection and to increase the OS rate. However, controlled, randomized trials addressing the impact of neoadjuvant CRT survival do not exist. METHODS/DESIGN: The underlying hypothesis of this randomized, two-armed, open-label, multicenter, phase III trial is that neoadjuvant CRT increases the three-year overall survival by 12% compared to patients undergoing upfront surgery for resectable pancreatic cancer. A rigorous, standardized technique of histopathologically handling Whipple specimens will be applied at all participating centers. Overall, 410 patients (n=205 in each study arm) will be enrolled in the trial, taking into regard an expected drop out rate of 7% and allocated either to receive neoadjuvant CRT prior to surgery or to undergo surgery alone. Circumferential resection margin status, i.e. R0 and R1 rates, respectively, surgical resectability rate, local and distant disease-free and global survival, and first site of tumor recurrence constitute further essential endpoints of the trial. DISCUSSION: For the first time, the NEOPA study investigates the impact of neoadjuvant CRT on survival of resectable pancreas head cancer in a prospectively randomized manner. The results of the study have the potential to change substantially the treatment regimen of pancreas cancer. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Clinical Trial gov: NCT01900327, DRKS00003893, ISRCTN82191749.

12 Clinical Trial Optimal duration and timing of adjuvant chemotherapy after definitive surgery for ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas: ongoing lessons from the ESPAC-3 study. 2014

Valle, Juan W / Palmer, Daniel / Jackson, Richard / Cox, Trevor / Neoptolemos, John P / Ghaneh, Paula / Rawcliffe, Charlotte L / Bassi, Claudio / Stocken, Deborah D / Cunningham, David / O'Reilly, Derek / Goldstein, David / Robinson, Bridget A / Karapetis, Christos / Scarfe, Andrew / Lacaine, Francois / Sand, Juhani / Izbicki, Jakob R / Mayerle, Julia / Dervenis, Christos / Oláh, Attila / Butturini, Giovanni / Lind, Pehr A / Middleton, Mark R / Anthoney, Alan / Sumpter, Kate / Carter, Ross / Büchler, Markus W. ·Juan W. Valle, Derek O'Reilly, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and University of Manchester, Manchester · Richard Jackson, Trevor Cox, John P. Neoptolemos, Paula Ghaneh, Charlotte L. Rawcliffe, Liverpool Cancer Research UK Centre and the National Institute for Health Research Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool · Daniel Palmer, the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust · Deborah D. Stocken, the Cancer Research UK Clinical Trials Unit, University of Birmingham, Birmingham · David Cunningham, Royal Marsden Hospital Foundation Trust, Sutton · Mark R. Middleton, Churchill Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford · Alan Anthoney, The Leeds Teaching Hospital Trust, Leeds · Kate Sumpter, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne · Ross Carter, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom · Claudio Bassi, Giovanni Butturini, University of Verona, Verona, Italy · David Goldstein, Bridget A. Robinson, Christos Karapetis, the Australasian Gastro-Intestinal Trials Group, Camperdown, Australia · Andrew Scarfe, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada · Francois Lacaine, Hôpital TENON, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Universite Pierre Et Marie Curie, Paris, France · Juhani Sand, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland · Jakob R. Izbicki, University of Hamburg, Hamburg · Julia Mayerle, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, Greifswald · Markus W. Büchler, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany · Christos Dervenis, the Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece · Attila Oláh, the Petz Aladar Hospital, Gyor, Hungary · Pehr A. Lind, Karolinska-Stockholm Söder Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #24419109.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Adjuvant chemotherapy improves patient survival rates after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma, but the optimal duration and time to initiate chemotherapy is unknown. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated within the international, phase III, European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer-3 (version 2) study were included if they had been randomly assigned to chemotherapy. Overall survival analysis was performed on an intention-to-treat basis, retaining patients in their randomized groups, and adjusting the overall treatment effect by known prognostic variables as well as the start time of chemotherapy. RESULTS: There were 985 patients, of whom 486 (49%) received gemcitabine and 499 (51%) received fluorouracil; 675 patients (68%) completed all six cycles of chemotherapy (full course) and 293 patients (30%) completed one to five cycles. Lymph node involvement, resection margins status, tumor differentiation, and completion of therapy were all shown by multivariable Cox regression to be independent survival factors. Overall survival favored patients who completed the full six courses of treatment versus those who did not (hazard ratio [HR], 0.516; 95% CI, 0.443 to 0.601; P < .001). Time to starting chemotherapy did not influence overall survival rates for the full study population (HR, 0.985; 95% CI, 0.956 to 1.015). Chemotherapy start time was an important survival factor only for the subgroup of patients who did not complete therapy, in favor of later treatment (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Completion of all six cycles of planned adjuvant chemotherapy rather than early initiation was an independent prognostic factor after resection for pancreatic adenocarcinoma. There seems to be no difference in outcome if chemotherapy is delayed up to 12 weeks, thus allowing adequate time for postoperative recovery.

13 Clinical Trial Adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil plus folinic acid vs gemcitabine following pancreatic cancer resection: a randomized controlled trial. 2010

Neoptolemos, John P / Stocken, Deborah D / Bassi, Claudio / Ghaneh, Paula / Cunningham, David / Goldstein, David / Padbury, Robert / Moore, Malcolm J / Gallinger, Steven / Mariette, Christophe / Wente, Moritz N / Izbicki, Jakob R / Friess, Helmut / Lerch, Markus M / Dervenis, Christos / Oláh, Attila / Butturini, Giovanni / Doi, Ryuichiro / Lind, Pehr A / Smith, David / Valle, Juan W / Palmer, Daniel H / Buckels, John A / Thompson, Joyce / McKay, Colin J / Rawcliffe, Charlotte L / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous9620671. ·Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit, Cancer Research UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Fifth Floor, UCD Bldg, Daulby Street, Liverpool, L69 3GA, United Kingdom. j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk ·JAMA · Pubmed #20823433.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Adjuvant fluorouracil has been shown to be of benefit for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Gemcitabine is known to be the most effective agent in advanced disease as well as an effective agent in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether fluorouracil or gemcitabine is superior in terms of overall survival as adjuvant treatment following resection of pancreatic cancer. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: The European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC)-3 trial, an open-label, phase 3, randomized controlled trial conducted in 159 pancreatic cancer centers in Europe, Australasia, Japan, and Canada. Included in ESPAC-3 version 2 were 1088 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who had undergone cancer resection; patients were randomized between July 2000 and January 2007 and underwent at least 2 years of follow-up. INTERVENTIONS: Patients received either fluorouracil plus folinic acid (folinic acid, 20 mg/m(2), intravenous bolus injection, followed by fluorouracil, 425 mg/m(2) intravenous bolus injection given 1-5 days every 28 days) (n = 551) or gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2) intravenous infusion once a week for 3 of every 4 weeks) (n = 537) for 6 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome measure was overall survival; secondary measures were toxicity, progression-free survival, and quality of life. RESULTS: Final analysis was carried out on an intention-to-treat basis after a median of 34.2 (interquartile range, 27.1-43.4) months' follow-up after 753 deaths (69%). Median survival was 23.0 (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.1-25.0) months for patients treated with fluorouracil plus folinic acid and 23.6 (95% CI, 21.4-26.4) months for those treated with gemcitabine (chi(1)(2) = 0.7; P = .39; hazard ratio, 0.94 [95% CI, 0.81-1.08]). Seventy-seven patients (14%) receiving fluorouracil plus folinic acid had 97 treatment-related serious adverse events, compared with 40 patients (7.5%) receiving gemcitabine, who had 52 events (P < .001). There were no significant differences in either progression-free survival or global quality-of-life scores between the treatment groups. CONCLUSION: Compared with the use of fluorouracil plus folinic acid, gemcitabine did not result in improved overall survival in patients with completely resected pancreatic cancer. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00058201.

14 Article Evaluation of the MDACC clinical classification system for pancreatic cancer patients in an European multicenter cohort. 2019

Uzunoglu, F G / Welte, M-N / Gavazzi, F / Maggino, L / Perinel, J / Salvia, R / Janot, M / Reeh, M / Perez, D / Montorsi, M / Zerbi, A / Adham, M / Uhl, W / Bassi, C / Izbicki, J R / Malleo, G / Bockhorn, M. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General Surgery, Humanitas Research Hosptital and University, Istituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Unit of General and Pancreatic Surgery, The Pancreas Institute, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Hospices Civils de Lyon & Lyon Sud Faculty of Medicine, UCBL1, E. Herriot Hospital, Department of Digestive Surgery, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, St. Josef-Hospital Bochum, Hospital of the Ruhr- University, Bochum, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: m.bockhorn@uke.de. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #30585172.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The MDACC group recommends to extend the current borderline classification for pancreatic cancer into three groups: type A patients with resectable/borderline tumor anatomy, type B with resectable/borderline resectable tumor anatomy and clinical findings suspicious for extrapancreatic disease and type C with borderline resectable and marginal performance status/severe pre-existing comorbidity profile or age>80. This study intents to evaluate the proposed borderline classification system in a multicenter patient cohort without neoadjuvant treatment. METHODS: Evaluation was based on a multicenter database of pancreatic cancer patients undergoing surgery from 2005 to 2016 (n = 1020). Complications were classified based on the Clavien-Dindo classification. χ RESULTS: Most patients (55.1%) were assigned as type A patients, followed by type C (35.8%) and type B patients (9.1%). Neither the complication rate, nor the mortality rate revealed a correlation to any subgroup. Type B patients had a significant worse progression free (p < 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.005). Type B classification was identified as an independent prognostic marker for progression free survival (p = 0.005, HR 1.47). CONCLUSION: The evaluation of the proposed classification in a cohort without neoadjuvant treatment did not justify an additional medical borderline subgroup. A new subgroup based on prognostic borderline patients might be the main target group for neoadjuvant protocols in future.

15 Article Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of pancreatic cancer: A PANDoRA study. 2019

Campa, Daniele / Matarazzi, Martina / Greenhalf, William / Bijlsma, Maarten / Saum, Kai-Uwe / Pasquali, Claudio / van Laarhoven, Hanneke / Szentesi, Andrea / Federici, Francesca / Vodicka, Pavel / Funel, Niccola / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Vodickova, Ludmila / Basso, Daniela / Obazee, Ofure / Hackert, Thilo / Soucek, Pavel / Cuk, Katarina / Kaiser, Jörg / Sperti, Cosimo / Lovecek, Martin / Capurso, Gabriele / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Khaw, Kay-Tee / König, Anna-Katharina / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Kaaks, Rudolf / Bambi, Franco / Archibugi, Livia / Mambrini, Andrea / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Landi, Stefano / Hegyi, Péter / Izbicki, Jakob R / Gioffreda, Domenica / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Tavano, Francesca / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Key, Timothy J / Fave, Gianfranco Delle / Strobel, Oliver / Jonaitis, Laimas / Andriulli, Angelo / Lawlor, Rita T / Pirozzi, Felice / Katzke, Verena / Valsuani, Chiara / Vashist, Yogesh K / Brenner, Hermann / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Medical Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Aging Research, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Pancreatic and Digestive Endocrine Surgery - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute for Translational Medicine, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary. · First Department of Medicine, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Italy. · Department of Molecular Biology of Cancer, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Academy of Science of Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Experimental Surgical Pathology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Centre, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Third Surgical Clinic - Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University, Rome, Italy. · PancreatoBiliary Endoscopy and EUS Division, Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Center, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Vita Salute San Raffaele University, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Institute of Molecular and Translational Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · MTA-SZTE Momentum Translational Gastroenterology Research Group, Szeged, Hungary. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Molecular Biology Lab, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · ARC-NET, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Abdominal Surgery, IRCCS Ospedale Casa Sollievo Sofferenza, San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #30325019.

ABSTRACT: Telomere deregulation is a hallmark of cancer. Telomere length measured in lymphocytes (LTL) has been shown to be a risk marker for several cancers. For pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) consensus is lacking whether risk is associated with long or short telomeres. Mendelian randomization approaches have shown that a score built from SNPs associated with LTL could be used as a robust risk marker. We explored this approach in a large scale study within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We analyzed 10 SNPs (ZNF676-rs409627, TERT-rs2736100, CTC1-rs3027234, DHX35-rs6028466, PXK-rs6772228, NAF1-rs7675998, ZNF208-rs8105767, OBFC1-rs9420907, ACYP2-rs11125529 and TERC-rs10936599) alone and combined in a LTL genetic score ("teloscore", which explains 2.2% of the telomere variability) in relation to PDAC risk in 2,374 cases and 4,326 controls. We identified several associations with PDAC risk, among which the strongest were with the TERT-rs2736100 SNP (OR = 1.54; 95%CI 1.35-1.76; p = 1.54 × 10

16 Article Expression of ICAM-1, E-cadherin, periostin and midkine in metastases of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. 2018

Grupp, Katharina / Melling, Nathaniel / Bogoevska, Valentina / Reeh, Matthias / Uzunoglu, Faik Güntac / El Gammal, Alexander Tarek / Nentwich, Michael Fabian / Izbicki, Jakob Robert / Bogoevski, Dean. ·General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: k.grupp@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: n.melling@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: v.bogoevski@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: f.uzunoglu@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: a.elgammal@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: m.nentwich@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: izbicki@uke.de. · General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery Department and Clinic, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistr. 52, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: d.bogoevski@uke.de. ·Exp Mol Pathol · Pubmed #29355490.

ABSTRACT: Development and progression of malignant tumors is in part characterized by the ability of a tumor cell to overcome cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion and to disseminate in organs distinct from that in which they originated. This study was undertaken to analyze the clinical significance of the expression of the following cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) and synchronous liver metastases: intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), E-cadherin, periostin, and midkine (MK). ICAM-1, E-cadherin, periostin and MK expression was analyzed by immunohistochemistry on a tissue microarray containing 34 PDACs and 12 liver metastasis specimens. ICAM-1 expression was predominantly localized in the membranes of the cells and was found in weak to moderate intensities in PDACs and liver metastases. E-cadherin expression was absent in the majority of PDACs and corresponding liver metastases. The secreted proteins periostin and MK were expressed in various intensities in primary cancers and liver metastases. Statistical analysis demonstrated that the expression levels of the analyzed markers were neither significantly associated with metastasis in PDACs nor with clinical outcome of patients. Our study shows that the expression of the cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules ICAM-1, E-cadherin, periostin and MK was not significantly linked to metastatic disease in PDACs. Moreover, our study excludes the analyzed markers as prognostic markers in PDACs.

17 Article Establishment of the First Well-differentiated Human Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Model. 2018

Benten, Daniel / Behrang, Yasmin / Unrau, Ludmilla / Weissmann, Victoria / Wolters-Eisfeld, Gerrit / Burdak-Rothkamm, Susanne / Stahl, Felix R / Anlauf, Martin / Grabowski, Patricia / Möbs, Markus / Dieckhoff, Jan / Sipos, Bence / Fahl, Martina / Eggers, Corinna / Perez, Daniel / Bockhorn, Maximillian / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lohse, Ansgar W / Schrader, Jörg. ·I. Medical Department - Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Helios Klinik Duisburg, Duisburg, Germany. · Department of Stem Cell Transplantation, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General-, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Institute of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Limburg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, Charite Campus Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, Germany. · Institute of Pathology, Charité - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany. · Department for Interventional and Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. · I. Medical Department - Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. j.schrader@uke.de. ·Mol Cancer Res · Pubmed #29330294.

ABSTRACT: Clinical options for systemic therapy of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are limited. Development of new drugs requires suitable representative

18 Article Do pancreatic cancer and chronic pancreatitis share the same genetic risk factors? A PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium investigation. 2018

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Capurso, Gabriele / Hackert, Thilo / Di Leo, Milena / Izbicki, Jakob R / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Gioffreda, Domenica / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Pasquali, Claudio / Macinga, Peter / Kaaks, Rudolf / Stigliano, Serena / Peeters, Petra H / Key, Timothy J / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Vodicka, Pavel / Valente, Roberto / Vashist, Yogesh K / Salvia, Roberto / Papaconstantinou, Ioannis / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Valsuani, Chiara / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Gazouli, Maria / Valantiene, Irena / Niesen, Willem / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Hara, Kazuo / Soucek, Pavel / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B As / Johnson, Theron / Brenner, Herman / Tavano, Francesca / Fogar, Paola / Ito, Hidemi / Sperti, Cosimo / Butterbach, Katja / Latiano, Anna / Andriulli, Angelo / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Busch, Olivier R C / Dijk, Frederike / Greenhalf, William / Matsuo, Keitaro / Lombardo, Carlo / Strobel, Oliver / König, Anna-Katharina / Cuk, Katarina / Strothmann, Hendrik / Katzke, Verena / Cantore, Maurizio / Mambrini, Andrea / Oliverius, Martin / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Landi, Stefano / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, United Kingdom. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology (DiSCOG), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Sciences and Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Epidemiology, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands. · MRC-PHE Centre for Environment and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom. · Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Aarau, Switzerland. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Second Department of Surgery, Aretaieion Hospital, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Oncological Department, Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Oncological Unit of Massa Carrara, Carrara, Massa and Carrara, Italy. · Department of Medicine (DIMED), University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, St Mary's Campus, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Division of Clinical Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Division of Preventive Oncology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg, Germany. · German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular and Clinical Epidemiology, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Epidemiology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. · Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Dipartimento di Ricerca Traslazionale e delle Nuove Tecnologie in Medicina e Chirurgia, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Diseases and Internal Medicine Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #28913878.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a very aggressive tumor with a five-year survival of less than 6%. Chronic pancreatitis (CP), an inflammatory process in of the pancreas, is a strong risk factor for PDAC. Several genetic polymorphisms have been discovered as susceptibility loci for both CP and PDAC. Since CP and PDAC share a consistent number of epidemiologic risk factors, the aim of this study was to investigate whether specific CP risk loci also contribute to PDAC susceptibility. We selected five common SNPs (rs11988997, rs379742, rs10273639, rs2995271 and rs12688220) that were identified as susceptibility markers for CP and analyzed them in 2,914 PDAC cases, 356 CP cases and 5,596 controls retrospectively collected in the context of the international PANDoRA consortium. We found a weak association between the minor allele of the PRSS1-PRSS2-rs10273639 and an increased risk of developing PDAC (OR

19 Article Blood fibrinogen levels discriminate low- and high-risk intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). 2017

Nentwich, M F / Menzel, K / Reeh, M / Uzunoglu, F G / Ghadban, T / Bachmann, K / Schrader, J / Bockhorn, M / Izbicki, J R / Perez, D. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. · Department of Medicine I, University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center of Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany. Electronic address: d.perez@uke.de. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28131667.

ABSTRACT: BACKROUND: The risk assessment of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN) to either guide patients to surgical resection or watchful waiting is still under debate. Additional markers to better separate low and high-risk lesions would improve patient selection. METHODS: Patients who underwent pancreatic resections for IPMNs between January 2008 and December 2012 with available blood samples were selected and retrospectively assessed. Data on cyst characteristics such as cyst size, duct relation and main-duct dilatation were collected and plasma fibrinogen levels were measured. RESULTS: A total of 73 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria by pancreatic resection for pathologically confirmed IPMN and available blood sample. Histologically, IPMNs were classified as low-grade and borderline in 52 (71.2%, group 1) and as high-grade and invasive in 21 (28.8%, group 2) of all cases. Fibrinogen levels showed significant differences between the two groups (group 1: mean 3.62 g/L (SD ± 1.14); group 2: mean 4.49 g/L (SD ± 1.57); p = 0.027). A ROC-curve analysis calculated cut-off value of 4.71 g/L separated groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.008). Fibrinogen levels remained as the only significant factor in multivariable analysis, cyst size and duct relation were not significant. CONCLUSION: Blood fibrinogen differed between low and high risk IPMNs and therefore, the use of fibrinogen as an additional discriminator in the pre-operative risk assessment of IPMNs should be further evaluated.

20 Article HSP90 is a promising target in gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil resistant pancreatic cancer. 2017

Ghadban, Tarik / Dibbern, Judith L / Reeh, Matthias / Miro, Jameel T / Tsui, Tung Y / Wellner, Ulrich / Izbicki, Jakob R / Güngör, Cenap / Vashist, Yogesh K. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University Medical College Rostock, Schillingallee 35, 18057, Rostock, Germany. · Clinic for Surgery, University Clinic of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23562, Luebeck, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. vashist@uke.de. · Department of Visceral Surgery, Kantonsspital Aarau AG, Tellstrasse 25, 5001, Aarau, Switzerland. vashist@uke.de. ·Apoptosis · Pubmed #27878398.

ABSTRACT: Chemotherapy (CT) options in pancreatic cancer (PC) are limited to gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Several identified molecular targets in PC represent client proteins of HSP90. HSP90 is a promising target since it interferes with many oncogenic signaling pathways simultaneously. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of different HSP90 inhibitors in gemcitabine and 5-FU resistant PC. PC cell lines 5061, 5072 and 5156 were isolated and brought in to culture from patients being operated at our institution. L3.6pl cell line served as a control. Anti-proliferative efficacy of three different HSP90 inhibitors (17-AAG, 17-DMAG and 17-AEPGA) was evaluated by the MTT assay. Alterations in signaling pathway effectors and apoptosis upon HSP90 inhibition were determined by western blot analysis and annexin V/PI staining. The cell lines 5061, 5072 and 5156 were resistant to gemcitabine and 5-FU. In contrast 17-AAG and the water-soluble derivates 17-DMAG and 17-AEPGA displayed high anti-proliferative activity in all tested cell lines. The calculated IC

21 Article Functional single nucleotide polymorphisms within the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A/2B region affect pancreatic cancer risk. 2016

Campa, Daniele / Pastore, Manuela / Gentiluomo, Manuel / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Malecka-Panas, Ewa / Neoptolemos, John P / Niesen, Willem / Vodicka, Pavel / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H Bas / Gazouli, Maria / Pacetti, Paola / Di Leo, Milena / Ito, Hidemi / Klüter, Harald / Soucek, Pavel / Corbo, Vincenzo / Yamao, Kenji / Hosono, Satoyo / Kaaks, Rudolf / Vashist, Yogesh / Gioffreda, Domenica / Strobel, Oliver / Shimizu, Yasuhiro / Dijk, Frederike / Andriulli, Angelo / Ivanauskas, Audrius / Bugert, Peter / Tavano, Francesca / Vodickova, Ludmila / Zambon, Carlo Federico / Lovecek, Martin / Landi, Stefano / Key, Timothy J / Boggi, Ugo / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Jamroziak, Krzysztof / Mohelnikova-Duchonova, Beatrice / Mambrini, Andrea / Bambi, Franco / Busch, Olivier / Pazienza, Valerio / Valente, Roberto / Theodoropoulos, George E / Hackert, Thilo / Capurso, Gabriele / Cavestro, Giulia Martina / Pasquali, Claudio / Basso, Daniela / Sperti, Cosimo / Matsuo, Keitaro / Büchler, Markus / Khaw, Kay-Tee / Izbicki, Jakob / Costello, Eithne / Katzke, Verena / Michalski, Christoph / Stepien, Anna / Rizzato, Cosmeri / Canzian, Federico. ·Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg, Germany. · Institute of Experimental Medicine, Czech Academy of Science, Prague, Czech Republic. · Institute of Biology and Medical Genetics, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, S. Andrea Hospital, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department for Determinants of Chronic Diseases (DCD), National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands. · Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom. · Department of Social & Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. · Department of Basic Medical Sciences, Laboratory of Biology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Oncological Department Massa Carrara Azienda USL Toscana Nord Ovest, Carrara, Italy. · Gastroenterology and Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit, Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Division Epidemiology and Prevention, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Institute of Transfusion Medicine and Immunology, German Red Cross Blood Service Baden-Württemberg - Hessen gGmbH, Medical Faculty Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Mannheim, Germany. · Laboratory of Toxicogenomics, National Institute of Public Health, Prague, Czech Republic. · Laboratory of Pharmacogenomics, Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Pilsen, Czech Republic. · ARC-Net Research Centre, and Department of Diagnostics and Public Health University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterology, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Division of Cancer Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo, Italy. · Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Aichi Cancer Center Hospital, Nagoya, Japan. · Department of Pathology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Biomedical Center, Faculty of Medicine in Pilsen, Charles University in Prague, Prague, Czech Republic. · Department of Medicine - DIMED, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Surgery I, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Epidemiology Unit Nuffield Department of Population Health University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Division of General and Transplant Surgery, Pisa University Hospital, Pisa, Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive System, Dant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Department of Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Transfusion Medicine, Warsaw, Poland. · Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Palacky University Olomouc and University Hospital Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Blood Transfusion Service, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Meyer, Florence, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Colorectal Unit, First Department of Propaedeutic Surgery, Athens Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Oncology and Gastroenterology-DiSCOG, University of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Department of Laboratory Medicine, University-Hospital of Padova, Padova, Italy. · Division of Molecular Medicine, Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Nagoya, Japan. · Clinical Gerontology Unit, Addenbrooke’s Hospital, School of Clinical Medicine, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. · Laboratory of Clinical, Transplant Immunology and Genetics, Copernicus Memorial Hospital, Lodz, Poland. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. ·Oncotarget · Pubmed #27486979.

ABSTRACT: The CDKN2A (p16) gene plays a key role in pancreatic cancer etiology. It is one of the most commonly somatically mutated genes in pancreatic cancer, rare germline mutations have been found to be associated with increased risk of developing familiar pancreatic cancer and CDKN2A promoter hyper-methylation has been suggested to play a critical role both in pancreatic cancer onset and prognosis. In addition several unrelated SNPs in the 9p21.3 region, that includes the CDNK2A, CDNK2B and the CDNK2B-AS1 genes, are associated with the development of cancer in various organs. However, association between the common genetic variability in this region and pancreatic cancer risk is not clearly understood. We sought to fill this gap in a case-control study genotyping 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2,857 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients and 6,111 controls in the context of the Pancreatic Disease Research (PANDoRA) consortium. We found that the A allele of the rs3217992 SNP was associated with an increased pancreatic cancer risk (ORhet=1.14, 95% CI 1.01-1.27, p=0.026, ORhom=1.30, 95% CI 1.12-1.51, p=0.00049). This pleiotropic variant is reported to be a mir-SNP that, by changing the binding site of one or more miRNAs, could influence the normal cell cycle progression and in turn increase PDAC risk. In conclusion, we observed a novel association in a pleiotropic region that has been found to be of key relevance in the susceptibility to various types of cancer and diabetes suggesting that the CDKN2A/B locus could represent a genetic link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer risk.

22 Article Synchronous resections of hepatic oligometastatic pancreatic cancer: Disputing a principle in a time of safe pancreatic operations in a retrospective multicenter analysis. 2016

Tachezy, Michael / Gebauer, Florian / Janot, Monika / Uhl, Waldemar / Zerbi, Alessandro / Montorsi, Marco / Perinel, Julie / Adham, Mustapha / Dervenis, Christos / Agalianos, Christos / Malleo, Giuseppe / Maggino, Laura / Stein, Alexander / Izbicki, Jakob R / Bockhorn, Maximilian. ·Department of General, Visceral, and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral, and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: fgebauer@uke.de. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, St. Josef-Hospital Bochum, Hospital of the Ruhr-University, Bochum, Germany. · Department of General Surgery, University of Milan, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Department of Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Edouard Herriot Hospital, HCL, Lyon Faculty of Medicine - UCBL1, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Unit of Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Hematology, BMT with section Pneumology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany. ·Surgery · Pubmed #27048934.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The prognosis of patients with liver metastasis is generally considered dismal, and combined resections of the primary tumor and metastasectomies are not recommended. In highly selected patients, however, resections are performed. The evidence for this indication is limited. The aim of the current study was to assess the operative and oncologic outcomes of patients with combined pancreatic and liver resections of synchronous liver metastases. METHODS: In a retrospective analysis of 6 European pancreas centers, we identified 69 patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma and synchronous liver metastasis who underwent simultaneous pancreas and liver metastasis resections. Patients receiving exploration without tumor resection served as the control group. RESULTS: Overall survival (OS) appeared to be prolonged in the group of resected patients (median 14 vs 8 months, P < .001). Subgroup analysis revealed that the survival benefit of the resected patients was driven by pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas localized in the pancreatic head (median OS 13.6 vs 7 months, P < .001). Body/tail pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas showed no benefit of resection (median OS 14 vs 15 months, P = .312). In the multivariate analysis, tumor resection was the only independent prognosticator for OS (hazard ratio 2.044, 95% confidence interval 1.342-3.114). CONCLUSION: The data of this retrospective and selective patient cohort suggested a clear survival benefit for patients undergoing synchronous pancreas and liver resections for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, but due to the limitations of this retrospective study and very strong potential for selection bias, a strong conclusion for resection cannot be drawn. Prospective trials must validate these data and investigate the use of combined operative and systemic treatments in case of resectable metastatic pancreatic cancer. Is it time for a multicenter, prospective trial?

23 Article Relevance of Sp Binding Site Polymorphism in WWOX for Treatment Outcome in Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Schirmer, Markus A / Lüske, Claudia M / Roppel, Sebastian / Schaudinn, Alexander / Zimmer, Christian / Pflüger, Ruben / Haubrock, Martin / Rapp, Jacobe / Güngör, Cenap / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Hackert, Thilo / Hank, Thomas / Strobel, Oliver / Werner, Jens / Izbicki, Jakob R / Johnsen, Steven A / Gaedcke, Jochen / Brockmöller, Jürgen / Ghadimi, B Michael. ·Affiliations of authors:Institute of Clinical Pharmacology (MAS, CML, SR, AS, CZ, RP, JB), Institute of Bioinformatics (MH), Clinic of General and Visceral Surgery (CML, SR, JR, SAJ, JG, BMG), and Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology (MAS), University Medical Center Göttingen , Göttingen , Germany · Department of General, Visceral, and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf , Hamburg , Germany (CG, MB, JRI) · Department of General, Visceral, and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg , Heidelberg , Germany (THac, THan, OS, JW). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #26857392.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A genome-wide association study (GWAS) suggested inherited genetic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting overall survival (OS) in advanced pancreatic cancer. To identify robust clinical biomarkers, we tested the strongest reported candidate loci in an independent patient cohort, assessed cellular drug sensitivity, and evaluated molecular effects. METHODS: This study comprised 381 patients with histologically verified pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma treated with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy. The primary outcome was the relationship between germline polymorphisms and OS. Functional assays addressed pharmacological dose-response effects in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and pancreatic cancer cell lines (including upon RNAi), gene expression analyses, and allele-specific transcription factor binding. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: The A allele (26% in Caucasians) at SNP rs11644322 in the putative tumor suppressor gene WWOX conferred worse prognosis. Median OS was 14 months (95% confidence interval [CI] = 12 to 15 months), 13 months (95% CI = 11 to 15 months), and nine months (95% CI = 7 to 12 months) for the GG, GA, and AA genotypes, respectively (P trend < .001 for trend in univariate log-rank assuming a codominant mode of inheritance; advanced disease subgroup P trend < .001). Mean OS was 25 months (95% CI = 21 to 29 months), 19 months (95% CI = 15 to 22 months), and 13 months (95% CI = 10 to 16 months), respectively. This effect held true after adjustment for age, performance status according to Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group classification, TNM, grading, and resection status and was comparable with the strongest established prognostic factors in multivariable analysis. Consistently, reduced responsiveness to gemcitabine, but not 5-fluorouracil, along with lower WWOX expression was demonstrated in LCLs harboring the AA genotype. Likewise, RNAi-mediated WWOX knockdown in pancreatic cancer cells confirmed differential cytostatic drug sensitivity. In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, the A allele exhibited weaker binding of Sp family members Sp1/Sp3. CONCLUSIONS: WWOX rs11644322 represents a major predictive factor in gemcitabine-treated pancreatic cancer. Decreased WWOX expression may interfere with gemcitabine sensitivity, and allele-specific binding at rs11644332 might be a causative molecular mechanism behind the observed clinical associations.

24 Article COSMC knockdown mediated aberrant O-glycosylation promotes oncogenic properties in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Hofmann, Bianca T / Schlüter, Laura / Lange, Philip / Mercanoglu, Baris / Ewald, Florian / Fölster, Aljonna / Picksak, Aeint-Steffen / Harder, Sönke / El Gammal, Alexander T / Grupp, Katharina / Güngör, Cenap / Drenckhan, Astrid / Schlüter, Hartmut / Wagener, Christoph / Izbicki, Jakob R / Jücker, Manfred / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Wolters-Eisfeld, Gerrit. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. bi.hofmann@uke.de. · Department of Anatomy and Experimental Morphology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. bi.hofmann@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. Lauraschlueter88@web.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. philip_lange@gmx.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. b.mercanoglu@uke.de. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Transplant Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. f.ewald@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. aljonna@foefi.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. 6362331@stud.uke.uni-hamburg.de. · Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. harder@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. a.el-gammal@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. k.grupp@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. c.guengoer@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. a.drenckhan@uke.de. · Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. hschluet@uke.de. · Department of Clinical Chemistry, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. christoph.wagener@me.com. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. izbicki@uke.de. · Institute for Biochemistry and Signal Transduction, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. juecker@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. m.bockhorn@uke.de. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. ge.wolters@uke.de. ·Mol Cancer · Pubmed #26021314.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most aggressive and lethal malignancies in the world and despite great efforts in research types of treatment remain limited. A frequently detected alteration in PDACs is a truncated O-linked N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) glycosylation with expression of the Tn antigen. Changes in O-glycosylation affect posttranslationally modified O-GalNAc proteins resulting in profound cellular alterations. Tn antigen is a tumor associated glycan detected in 75-90 % of PDACs and up to 67 % in its precursor lesions. Since the role of Tn antigen expression in PDAC is insufficiently understood we analyzed the impact of COSMC mediated Tn antigen expression in two human PDAC cell lines on cellular oncogenic properties. METHODS: Forced expression of Tn antigen on O-glycosylated proteins in pancreatic cancer cells was induced by lentiviral-mediated knockdown of the COSMC chaperone, which prevented O-glycan elongation beyond the initial GalNAcα1- residue on O-linked glycoproteins. Altered O-GalNAc glycosylation was analyzed in human pancreatic cancer cell lines Panc-1 and L3.6pl using Western and Far-Western blot as well as immunocytochemical techniques. To assess the biological implications of COSMC function on oncogenic properties, cell viability assays, scratch assays combined with live cell imaging, migration and apoptosis assays were performed. Lectin based glycoprotein enrichment with subsequent mass spectrometric analysis identified new cancer O-GalNAc modified proteins. Expression of Tn antigen bearing Nucleolin in patient derived PDAC tumor specimens was evaluated and correlated with clinicopathological data. RESULTS: Tn antigen expression was induced on various O-GalNAc glycoproteins in COSMC deficient cell lines compared to the control. Proliferation was reduced (p < 0.001) in COSMC knockdown cells, whereas migration was increased (p < 0.001) and apoptosis was decreased (p = 0.03), highlighting the importance of Tn antigen expression on metastatic and anti-apoptotic behavior of PDAC derived cells. Nucleolin was identified as O-GalNAc modified protein in COSMC deficient PDAC cell lines. Interestingly, immunohistochemical staining and co-localization studies of patient derived PDACs revealed poor survival for patients with strong co-localization of Tn antigen and Nucleolin (p = 0.037). CONCLUSION: This study substantiates the influence of altered O-glycan (Tn/STn) expression on oncogenic properties in pancreatic cancer and identifies O-GalNAc modified Nucleolin as novel prognostic marker.

25 Article Salvage Completion Pancreatectomies as Damage Control for Post-pancreatic Surgery Complications: A Single-Center Retrospective Analysis. 2015

Nentwich, Michael F / El Gammal, Alexander T / Lemcke, Torben / Ghadban, Tarik / Bellon, Eugen / Melling, Nathaniel / Bachmann, Kai / Reeh, Matthias / Uzunoglu, Faik G / Izbicki, Jakob R / Bockhorn, Maximilian. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20246, Hamburg, Germany. ·World J Surg · Pubmed #25651954.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Post-pancreatic surgical morbidity is frequent but often manageable by less invasive means than re-operation. Yet, some complications can become hazardous and life threatening. Herein, the results of a completion pancreatectomy (CP) to cope with severe post-operative pancreatic fistulas (POPF) and bleeding complications after major pancreatic resections for suspected pancreatic malignancy are presented. METHODS: CPs to treat severe post-pancreatic index-surgery complications between January 2002 and January 2012 were selected out of a prospective database. Indications for CP as well as perioperative data were prospectively collected and retrospectively assessed. RESULTS: In 20 of 521 Kausch-Whipple Resections (3.8%), a CP was necessary to treat post-index surgery morbidity. Indications included insufficiency of the pancreaticojejunal anastomosis with resulting POPF in 14 (70.0%) patients, severe bleeding complications in 6 (30.0%) patients, and a severe portal vein thrombosis in 1 (5.0%) patient. In 7 (35.0%) of the 20 patients, the course was complicated by remnant pancreatitis. Eleven (55.0%) of the 20 patients died during the hospital stay. Median time to re-operation did not significantly differ between survivors and in-hospital deaths (10.0 vs. 8.0 days; p = 0.732). Median hospital stay of the surviving patients was 31.0 (range 10-113) days. Re-operations following CPs were necessary in 5 (55.6%) of the 9 patients who survived and in 9 (81.8%) out of 11 patients who died. CONCLUSIONS: Post-pancreatic resection complications can become hazardous and result in severely ill patients requiring maximum therapy. CP in these cases has a high mortality but serves as an ultima ratio to cope with deleterious complications.

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