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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Yoshinori Ito
Based on 11 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Yoshinori Ito wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 From the Japan Pancreas Society: A Synopsis. 2017

Yamaguchi, Koji / Okusaka, Takuji / Shimizu, Kyoko / Furuse, Junji / Ito, Yoshinori / Hanada, Keiji / Shimosegawa, Tooru / Okazaki, Kazuichi / Anonymous7740903. ·From the *Clinic of Fukuoka Government Building, Hamanomachi Hospital, Fukuoka; †Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital; ‡Department of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; §Department of Medical Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyorin University; ∥Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo; ¶Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi; #Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai; and **Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Japan. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #28426492.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on Evidence-Based Medicine 2006 were first published by the Japan Pancreas Society, and they were revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2009 in July 2009 and were further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2013 in October 2013. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. In October 2016, the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer were newly revised in Japanese. METHODS: In the revised version, we introduced the concepts of GRADE - grading recommendations assessment, development, and evaluation approach for better understanding of the current guidelines. RESULTS: The guidelines show algorithms for the diagnosis, treatment, and chemotherapy of pancreatic cancer and address 7 subjects: diagnosis, surgical therapy, adjuvant therapy, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, stent therapy, and palliative medicine. They include 51 clinical questions and 76 statements. There are statements corresponding to clinical questions, evidence levels, recommended strengths, and agreement rates. CONCLUSIONS: These guidelines represent the most standard clinical and practical management at this time in Japan. This is the English synopsis of the Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer 2016 in Japanese, which aims to disseminate the Japanese guidelines worldwide for the introduction of Japanese clinical management of these diseases.

2 Guideline EBM-based Clinical Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) issued by the Japan Pancreas Society: a synopsis. 2014

Yamaguchi, Koji / Okusaka, Takuji / Shimizu, Kyoko / Furuse, Junji / Ito, Yoshinori / Hanada, Keiji / Shimosegawa, Tooru / Anonymous6910805. ·Department of Advanced Treatment of Pancreatic Diseases, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu yamaguch@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp. · Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division, National Cancer Center, Tokyo. · Department of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Tokyo. · Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Tokyo. · Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo. · Department of Gastroenterology, JA Onomichi General Hospital, Onomichi. · Division of Gastroenterology, Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan. ·Jpn J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #25205672.

ABSTRACT: Clinical practice guidelines for pancreatic cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2006) were published by the Japan Pancreas Society (Committee for revision of clinical guidelines for pancreatic cancer) in March 2009 in Japanese, revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer based on evidence-based medicine (2009) in July 2009 in Japanese and further revised to Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer (2013) in October 2013 in Japanese. These guidelines were established according to evidence-based medicine. A total of 629 papers were collected from among 4612 reports concerning pancreatic cancer listed in PubMed and Igakuchuo Zasshi between May 2007 and January 2011. This new set of guidelines was written by members of the Committee for the Revision of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Pancreatic Cancer in the Japan Pancreas Society. The guidelines provide an algorithm for the diagnosis (Fig. 1) and treatment (Fig. 2) of pancreatic cancer and address six subjects (Diagnosis, Surgery, Adjuvant therapy, Radiation therapy, Chemotherapy and stent therapy), with 35 clinical questions and 57 recommendations.

3 Review Current status of chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer in Japan. 2008

Okusaka, Takuji / Ito, Yoshinori / Furuse, Junji / Yamada, Shigeru / Ishii, Hiroshi / Shibuya, Keiko / Ioka, Tatsuya / Shinchi, Hiroyuki. ·Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology Division, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo, 104-0045, Japan. tokusaka@ncc.go.jp ·Int J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #18463956.

ABSTRACT: Although the results of randomized controlled trials for locally advanced pancreatic cancer conducted between 1969 and 1988 demonstrated a survival advantage for concurrent radiotherapy and bolus 5-fluorouracil (FU) injection, the prognosis of patients with this disease remains very poor. In an attempt to improve patient outcome after chemoradiotherapy, various clinical trials for this disease have been conducted in Japan. These trials were designed to evaluate novel chemotherapy regimens combined with conventional radiotherapy, or intensive radiotherapy in combination with chemotherapy. After gemictabine was shown to yield a better survival outcome than 5-FU in patients with advanced disease, this drug was investigated as a chemotherapeutic agent and/or radiosensitizer for locally advanced pancreatic cancer in a number of trials. S-1, a novel oral fluoropyrimidine derivative that appears promising for the treatment of metastatic disease, is also being intensively evaluated in Japan for the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer. In this review, we summarize recent treatment strategies that are being used in Japan with the goal of establishing a new standard therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer.

4 Clinical Trial A multicenter phase II trial of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. 2013

Ikeda, Masafumi / Ioka, Tatsuya / Ito, Yoshinori / Yonemoto, Naohiro / Nagase, Michitaka / Yamao, Kenji / Miyakawa, Hiroyuki / Ishii, Hiroshi / Furuse, Junji / Sato, Keiko / Sato, Tosiya / Okusaka, Takuji. ·Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba, Japan. masikeda@east.ncc.go.jp ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #22677367.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: The aim of this trial was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of S-1 and concurrent radiation therapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: Locally advanced PC patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma, who had no previous therapy were enrolled. Radiation therapy was delivered through 3 or more fields at a total dose of 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions over 5.5 weeks. S-1 was administered orally at a dose of 80 mg/m2 twice daily on the day of irradiation during radiation therapy. After a 2- to 8-week break, patients received a maintenance dose of S-1 (80 mg/m2/day for 28 consecutive days, followed by a 14-day rest period) was then administered until the appearance of disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary efficacy endpoint was survival, and the secondary efficacy endpoints were progression-free survival, response rate, and serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) response; the safety endpoint was toxicity. RESULTS: Of the 60 evaluable patients, 16 patients achieved a partial response (27%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-40%). The median progression-free survival period, overall survival period, and 1-year survival rate of the evaluable patients were 9.7 months (95% CI, 6.9-11.6 months), 16.2 months (95% CI, 13.5-21.3 months), and 72% (95%CI, 59%-82%), respectively. Of the 42 patients with a pretreatment serum CA19-9 level of ≥100 U/ml, 34 (81%) patients showed a decrease of greater than 50%. Leukopenia (6 patients, 10%) and anorexia (4 patients, 7%) were the major grade 3-4 toxicities with chemoradiation therapy. CONCLUSIONS: The effect of S-1 with concurrent radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced PC was found to be very favorable, with only mild toxicity.

5 Article Efficacy of radiotherapy for primary tumor in patients with unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2017

Iwata, Tomoyuki / Ueno, Hideki / Itami, Jun / Ito, Yoshinori / Inaba, Koji / Morizane, Chigusa / Kondo, Shunsuke / Sakamoto, Yasunari / Shiba, Satoshi / Sasaki, Mitsuhito / Koga, Futa / Okusaka, Takuji. ·Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital. · Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. ·Jpn J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #28591817.

ABSTRACT: Background: Detailed information regarding the clinical efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) for primary tumor in patients with unresectable pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) is unknown. We therefore performed a retrospective study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RT for primary pancreatic tumors in patients with pNETs. Methods: We investigated 11 patients with pNETs who received RT to the primary site between January 1997 and June 2015. Seven patients had Grade 2 neuroendocrine tumors (NET-G2) and four had neuroendocrine carcinoma (NEC) according to the 2010 WHO histopathological classification. Results: The tumor response and control rates were 27.2% and 100%, respectively (3: partial response, 8: stable disease). Among patients with NET-G2 tumors, the response rate was 28.5% (2/7 patients) and symptomatic improvement was noted in 33.3% of the patients (1/3 patients). The response rate for patients with NEC were 25% (1/4), one NEC patients with symptoms exhibited symptomatic improvement. The median overall survival and median progression-free survival were 35.9 months and 5.5 months, respectively. Grade 3 diarrhea as an acute toxicity and Grade 3 gastrointestinal hemorrhage as a late toxicity were observed. Conclusions: RT to the primary cancer site in patients with pNETs was an effective modality for local disease control and the treated patients had good outcomes. If metastatic tumors are under control, RT to the primary site may be beneficial for patients with pNETs.

6 Article Salvage chemoradiotherapy after primary chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer: a single-institution retrospective analysis. 2012

Mayahara, Hiroshi / Ito, Yoshinori / Morizane, Chigusa / Ueno, Hideki / Okusaka, Takuji / Kondo, Shunsuke / Murakami, Naoya / Morota, Madoka / Sumi, Minako / Itami, Jun. ·Division of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan. hmayahar@ncc.go.jp ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #23256481.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is no consensus on the indication for salvage chemoradiotherapy (CRT) after failure of primary chemotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Here we report on the retrospective analysis of patients who received salvage CRT after primary chemotherapy for LAPC. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of salvage CRT after primary chemotherapy for LAPC. METHODS: Thirty patients who underwent salvage CRT, after the failure of primary chemotherapy for LAPC, were retrospectively enrolled from 2004 to 2011 at the authors' institution. All the patients had histologically confirmed pancreatic adenocarcinoma. RESULTS: Primary chemotherapy was continued until progression or emergence of unacceptable toxicity. Eventually, 26 patients (87%) discontinued primary chemotherapy because of local tumor progression, whereas four patients (13%) discontinued chemotherapy because of interstitial pneumonitis caused by gemcitabine. After a median period of 7.9 months from starting chemotherapy, 30 patients underwent salvage CRT combined with either S-1 or 5-FU. Toxicities were generally mild and self-limiting. Median survival time (MST) from the start of salvage CRT was 8.8 months. The 6 month, 1-year and 2-year survival rates from the start of CRT were 77%, 33% and 26%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that a lower pre-CRT serum CA 19-9 level (≤ 1000 U/ml; p = 0.009) and a single regimen of primary chemotherapy (p = 0.004) were independent prognostic factors for survival after salvage CRT. The MST for the entire patient population from the start of primary chemotherapy was 17.8 months, with 2- and 3-year overall survival rates of 39% and 22%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: CRT had moderate anti-tumor activity and an acceptable toxicity profile in patients with LAPC, even after failure of gemcitabine-based primary chemotherapy. If there are any signs of failure of primary chemotherapy without distant metastasis, salvage CRT could be a treatment of choice as a second-line therapy. Patients with relatively low serum CA19-9 levels after primary chemotherapy may achieve higher survival rates after salvage CRT. The strategy of using chemotherapy alone as a primary treatment for LAPC, followed-by CRT with salvage intent should be further investigated in prospective clinical trials. TRIAL REGISTRATION: 2011-136

7 Article Concurrent radiotherapy and gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma: impact of adjuvant chemotherapy on survival. 2012

Ogawa, Kazuhiko / Ito, Yoshinori / Hirokawa, Naoki / Shibuya, Keiko / Kokubo, Masaki / Ogo, Etsuyo / Shibuya, Hitoshi / Saito, Tsutomu / Onishi, Hiroshi / Karasawa, Katsuyuki / Nemoto, Kenji / Nishimura, Yasumasa / Anonymous2790708. ·Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan. kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #22019243.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To retrospectively analyze results of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) using gemcitabine (GEM) for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Records of 108 patients treated with concurrent external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and GEM were reviewed. The median dose of EBRT in all 108 patients was 50.4 Gy (range, 3.6-60.8 Gy), usually administered in conventional fractionations (1.8-2 Gy/day). During radiotherapy, most patients received GEM at a dosage of 250 to 350 mg/m(2) intravenously weekly for approximately 6 weeks. After CCRT, 59 patients (54.6%) were treated with adjuvant chemotherapy (AC), mainly with GEM. The median follow-up for all 108 patients was 11.0 months (range, 0.4-37.9 months). RESULTS: Initial responses after CCRT for 85 patients were partial response: 26 patients, no change: 51 patients and progressive disease: 8 patients. Local progression was observed in 35 patients (32.4%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 41.9%. Patients treated with total doses of 50 Gy or more had significantly more favorable LC rates (2-year LC rate, 42.9%) than patients treated with total doses of less than 50 Gy (2-year LC rate, 29.6%). Regional lymph node recurrence was found in only 1 patient, and none of the 57 patients with clinical N0 disease had regional lymph node recurrence. The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all patients were 23.5% and 11.6 months, respectively. Patients treated with AC had significantly more favorable OS rates (2-year OS, 31.8%) than those treated without AC (2-year OS, 12.4%; p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, AC use and clinical T stage were significant prognostic factors for OS. CONCLUSIONS: CCRT using GEM yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma, and CCRT with AC conferred a survival benefit compared to CCRT without AC.

8 Article Intraoperative radiotherapy for unresectable pancreatic cancer: a multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 144 patients. 2011

Ogawa, Kazuhiko / Karasawa, Katsuyuki / Ito, Yoshinori / Ogawa, Yoshihiro / Jingu, Keiichi / Onishi, Hiroshi / Aoki, Shinichi / Wada, Hitoshi / Kokubo, Masaki / Ogo, Etsuyo / Etoh, Hidehiro / Kazumoto, Tomoko / Takayama, Makoto / Nemoto, Kenji / Nishimura, Yasumasa / Anonymous6340664. ·Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa, Japan. kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #20598450.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) + external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for unresectable pancreatic cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The records of 144 patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT were reviewed. One hundred and thirteen patients (78.5%) were treated with IORT + EBRT and 114 patients (79.2%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy and 45 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up of all 144 patients was 9.6 months (range, 0.5-69.7 months). RESULTS: At the time of this analysis, 131 of 144 patients (91.0%) had disease recurrences. Local progression was observed in 60 patients (41.7%), and the 2-year local control (LC) rate in all patients was 44.6%. Patients treated with IORT, with or without, EBRT had significantly more favorable LC (2-year LC, 50.9%) than those treated with IORT without EBRT (p = 0.0004). The 2-year overall survival (OS) rate and the median survival time in all 144 patients were 14.7% and 10.5 months, respectively. Patients treated with chemotherapy had a significantly favorable OS than those treated without chemotherapy (p < 0.0001). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use alone had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; chemotherapy use was a significant prognostic factor. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of National Cancer Institute-Common Terminology Criteria Grade 3 was observed in 2 patients (1.4%). CONCLUSION: IORT + EBRT yields a relatively favorable LC rate for unresectable pancreatic cancer with low frequency of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy conferred a survival benefit compared with IORT without chemotherapy.

9 Article Intraoperative radiotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer: a multi-institutional retrospective analysis of 210 patients. 2010

Ogawa, Kazuhiko / Karasawa, Katsuyuki / Ito, Yoshinori / Ogawa, Yoshihiro / Jingu, Keiichi / Onishi, Hiroshi / Aoki, Shinichi / Wada, Hitoshi / Kokubo, Masaki / Etoh, Hidehiro / Kazumoto, Tomoko / Takayama, Makoto / Negoro, Yoshiharu / Nemoto, Kenji / Nishimura, Yasumasa / Anonymous3430652. ·Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan. kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #20207498.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To retrospectively analyze the results of intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT) with or without external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for resected pancreatic cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: The records of 210 patients treated with gross complete resection (R0: 147 patients; R1: 63 patients) and IORT with or without EBRT were reviewed. One hundred forty-seven patients (70.0%) were treated without EBRT and 114 patients (54.3%) were treated in conjunction with chemotherapy. The median doses of IORT and EBRT were 25 Gy (range, 20-30 Gy) and 45 Gy (range, 20-60Gy), respectively. The median follow-up of the surviving 62 patients was 26.3 months (range, 2.7-90.5 months). RESULTS: At the time of this analysis, 150 of 210 patients (71.4%) had disease recurrences. Local failure was observed in 31 patients (14.8%), and the 2-year local control rate in all patients was 83.7%. The median survival time and the 2-year actuarial overall survival (OS) in all 210 patients were 19.1 months and 42.1%, respectively. Patients treated with IORT and chemotherapy had a significantly more favorable OS than those treated with IORT alone (p = 0.0011). On univariate analysis, chemotherapy use, degree of resection, carbohydrate antigen 19-9, and pathological N stage had a significant impact on OS and on multivariate analysis; these four factors were significant prognostic factors. Late gastrointestinal morbidity of NCI-CTC Grade 4 was observed in 7 patients (3.3%). CONCLUSION: IORT yields an excellent local control rate for resected pancreatic cancer with few frequencies of severe late toxicity, and IORT combined with chemotherapy confers a survival benefit compared with that of IORT alone.

10 Article Patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan: results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) survey. 2010

Ogawa, Kazuhiko / Ito, Yoshinori / Karasawa, Katsuyuki / Ogawa, Yoshihiro / Onishi, Hiroshi / Kazumoto, Tomoko / Shibuya, Keiko / Shibuya, Hitoshi / Okuno, Yoshishige / Nishino, Shigeo / Ogo, Etsuyo / Uchida, Nobue / Karasawa, Kumiko / Nemoto, Kenji / Nishimura, Yasumasa / Anonymous1840642. ·Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa, Japan. kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp ·Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys · Pubmed #19879060.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. RESULTS: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. CONCLUSION: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

11 Article Serum soluble fas levels and superoxide dismutase activity and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer: A nested case-control study within the Japanese Collaborative Cohort Study. 2009

Lin, Yingsong / Kikuchi, Shogo / Yagyu, Kiyoko / Ishibashi, Teruo / Kurosawa, Michiko / Ito, Yoshinori / Watanabe, Yoshiyuki / Inaba, Yutaka / Tajima, Kazuo / Nakachi, Kei / Tamakoshi, Akiko / Anonymous2530663. ·Department of Public Health, Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Japan. linys@aichi-med-u.ac.jp ·Asian Pac J Cancer Prev · Pubmed #20553087.

ABSTRACT: In a search for novel circulating biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we examined the association between serum soluble Fas (sFas) levels and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and the risk of death from pancreatic cancer in a nested case-control study within the Japanese Collaborative Cohort Study. Case subjects were 68 persons who were free of morbidity, had provided a blood sample at baseline (1988-1990), and subsequently died from pancreatic cancer before December 31, 1997. Control subjects were 199 matched persons who were selected from the remaining participants in the cohort. Conditional logistic regression models were used to estimate age-adjusted and multivariate-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs). No statistically significant differences were noted in mean sFas levels (p=0.11) and SOD activity (p=0.42) between cases and controls. Overall, neither serum sFas levels nor SOD activity were associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer deaths, after adjustment for area, BMI, cigarette smoking, and history of diabetes. Furthermore, no significant risk trends were noted. Our results do not support the hypothesis that serum sFas levels and SOD activity are associated with pancreatic cancer risk.