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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Clem W. Imrie
Based on 9 articles published since 2010
(Why 9 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, C. Imrie wrote the following 9 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: definition and consensus of the International Study Group for Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Hartwig, Werner / Vollmer, Charles M / Fingerhut, Abe / Yeo, Charles J / Neoptolemos, John P / Adham, Mustapha / Andrén-Sandberg, Ake / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Bockhorn, Max / Charnley, Richard / Conlon, Kevin C / Dervenis, Christos / Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Imrie, Clem W / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milićević, Miroslav N / Montorsi, Marco / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Vashist, Yogesh K / Izbicki, Jakob R / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous1001108. ·Department of Surgery, Klinikum Großhadern, University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai, India. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Electronic address: markus.buechler@med.uni-heidelberg.de. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856668.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Complete macroscopic tumor resection is one of the most relevant predictors of long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Because locally advanced pancreatic tumors can involve adjacent organs, "extended" pancreatectomy that includes the resection of additional organs may be needed to achieve this goal. Our aim was to develop a common consistent terminology to be used in centers reporting results of pancreatic resections for cancer. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers reviewed the literature on extended pancreatectomies and worked together to establish a consensus on the definition and the role of extended pancreatectomy in pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: Macroscopic (R1) and microscopic (R0) complete tumor resection can be achieved in patients with locally advanced disease by extended pancreatectomy. Operative time, blood loss, need for blood transfusions, duration of stay in the intensive care unit, and hospital morbidity, and possibly also perioperative mortality are increased with extended resections. Long-term survival is similar compared with standard resections but appears to be better compared with bypass surgery or nonsurgical palliative chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. It was not possible to identify any clear prognostic criteria based on the specific additional organ resected. CONCLUSION: Despite increased perioperative morbidity, extended pancreatectomy is warranted in locally advanced disease to achieve long-term survival in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma if macroscopic clearance can be achieved. Definitions of extended pancreatectomies for locally advanced disease (and not distant metastatic disease) are established that are crucial for comparison of results of future trials across different practices and countries, in particular for those using neoadjuvant therapy.

2 Guideline Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer: a consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS). 2014

Bockhorn, Maximilian / Uzunoglu, Faik G / Adham, Mustapha / Imrie, Clem / Milicevic, Miroslav / Sandberg, Aken A / Asbun, Horacio J / Bassi, Claudio / Büchler, Markus / Charnley, Richard M / Conlon, Kevin / Cruz, Laureano Fernandez / Dervenis, Christos / Fingerhutt, Abe / Friess, Helmut / Gouma, Dirk J / Hartwig, Werner / Lillemoe, Keith D / Montorsi, Marco / Neoptolemos, John P / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Takaori, Kyoichi / Traverso, William / Vashist, Yogesh K / Vollmer, Charles / Yeo, Charles J / Izbicki, Jakob R / Anonymous991108. ·Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Academic Unit of Surgery, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · First Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal and HPB Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. · Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan. · St. Luke's Clinic - Center For Pancreatic and Liver Diseases, Boise, ID. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of General, Visceral and Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. Electronic address: izbicki@uke.de. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24856119.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This position statement was developed to expedite a consensus on definition and treatment for borderline resectable pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (BRPC) that would have worldwide acceptability. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons from well-established, high-volume centers collaborated on a literature review and development of consensus on issues related to borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. RESULTS: The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) supports the National Comprehensive Cancer Network criteria for the definition of BRPC. Current evidence supports operative exploration and resection in the case of involvement of the mesentericoportal venous axis; in addition, a new classification of extrahepatic mesentericoportal venous resections is proposed by the ISGPS. Suspicion of arterial involvement should lead to exploration to confirm the imaging-based findings. Formal arterial resections are not recommended; however, in exceptional circumstances, individual therapeutic approaches may be evaluated under experimental protocols. The ISGPS endorses the recommendations for specimen examination and the definition of an R1 resection (tumor within 1 mm from the margin) used by the British Royal College of Pathologists. Standard preoperative diagnostics for BRPC may include: (1) serum levels of CA19-9, because CA19-9 levels predict survival in large retrospective series; and also (2) the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score and the neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio because of the prognostic relevance of the systemic inflammatory response. Various regimens of neoadjuvant therapy are recommended only in the setting of prospective trials at high-volume centers. CONCLUSION: Current evidence justifies portomesenteric venous resection in patients with BRPC. Basic definitions were identified, that are currently lacking but that are needed to obtain further evidence and improvement for this important patient subgroup. A consensus for each topic is given.

3 Review Host systemic inflammatory response influences outcome in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Imrie, Clem W. ·Glasgow Royal Infirmary, G31 2ER, UK. Electronic address: clemimrie@gmail.com. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25975490.

ABSTRACT: This review of the influence of host systemic inflammatory response(SIR) on the outcome of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC)was the kernel of the 2014 George E Palade Memorial Prize Lecture at the Combined IAP-EPC Meeting held June 25-8 in Southampton,UK. The ability of the modified Glasgow Prognostic Score(mGPS) to stratify cancer outcomes has been demonstrated in >50 studies including >25000 patients from many countries. Other markers of SIR such as Prognostic Index and neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio(NLR) may also be used emphasising the non homogeneity of the PDAC patients. The mGPS score 0 is associated with better outcome,while scores of 1 & 2 are linked to poor performance status, greater weight loss, comorbidity and earlier death. Two papers show in resectable PDAC that longer life (27-37 months) occurs with mGPS 0, and < 18 months for mGPS 1 and 2, such that alternative therapy employing RFA may well be better than resection in those patients. In the greater number of PDAC patients unsuitable for resection the JAK-STAT inhibitor, ruxolitinib, has been found only to favourably modify PDAC in those with mGPS 1 or 2. Likewise the possible benefits of older anti inflammatory agents may be confined to these patients. An urgent reappraisal of the prognostic and therapeutic implications is now required in PDAC. Local inflammatory responses(LIR) are beneficial in PDAC and other cancers. Four grade stratification systems using Klintrup histology, T cell subtype analysis and Galon immune scores are accurate prognosticators.

4 Review Review article: enzyme supplementation in cystic fibrosis, chronic pancreatitis, pancreatic and periampullary cancer. 2010

Imrie, C W / Connett, G / Hall, R I / Charnley, R M. ·Lister Department of Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, 84 Castle Street, Glasgow, UK. clemimrie@googlemail.com ·Aliment Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #21054452.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND:   Over 11000 UK patients each year develop pancreatic exocrine insufficiency--the major causes are not rare: cystic fibrosis (>300 new cases/year), pancreatic cancer (>7000 new cases/year) and chronic pancreatitis (>4000 new cases/year). Affected patients present in diverse ways, and for chronic pancreatitis, diagnosis is frequently made rather late in the course of the disease. AIM: To raise awareness of key clinical issues specific to patients with pancreatic exocrine insufficiency through experience from UK clinicians, and to offer advice regarding appropriate treatment with pancreatic enzymes. METHODS: Three case studies describe clinical issues relating to pancreatic enzyme supplementation that may lead to underuse in patients with cystic fibrosis, pancreatic and periampullary cancer or chronic pancreatitis. RESULTS: The efficacy of the treatment of exocrine pancreatic insufficiency is dependent on adequate meal-time enzyme replacement therapy. Improvements in patients' weight and nutritional status are what is aimed for - an important reason for all doctors, nurses and dieticians to give this therapy close attention. CONCLUSIONS: Pancreatic exocrine insufficiency may result in malnutrition, but enzyme supplementation can greatly improve quality of life in these patients.

5 Article When to perform a pancreatoduodenectomy in the absence of positive histology? A consensus statement by the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery. 2014

Asbun, Horacio J / Conlon, Kevin / Fernandez-Cruz, Laureano / Friess, Helmut / Shrikhande, Shailesh V / Adham, Mustapha / Bassi, Claudio / Bockhorn, Maximilian / Büchler, Markus / Charnley, Richard M / Dervenis, Christos / Fingerhutt, Abe / Gouma, Dirk J / Hartwig, Werner / Imrie, Clem / Izbicki, Jakob R / Lillemoe, Keith D / Milicevic, Miroslav / Montorsi, Marco / Neoptolemos, John P / Sandberg, Aken A / Sarr, Michael / Vollmer, Charles / Yeo, Charles J / Traverso, L William / Anonymous521108. ·Department of General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL. Electronic address: Asbun.Horacio@mayo.edu. · Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin, Ireland. · Department of Surgery, Clinic Hospital of Barcelona, University of Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India. · Department of HPB Surgery, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon, France. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of General-, Visceral- and Thoracic-Surgery, University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of HPB & Transplant Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Department of First Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Centre Hospitalier Intercommunal, Poissy, France. · Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Acacdemic Unit of Surgery, Univesity of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Department of General Surgery, Instituto Clinico Humanitas IRCCS, University of Milan, Milan, Italy. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Research-UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterologic and General Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Penn Surgery, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Surgery, Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary and Related Cancer Center, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · St. Luke's Clinic - Center For Pancreatic and Liver Diseases, Boise, ID. ·Surgery · Pubmed #24661765.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) provides the best chance for cure in the treatment of patients with localized pancreatic head cancer. In patients with a suspected, clinically resectable pancreatic head malignancy, the need for histologic confirmation before proceeding with PD has not historically been required, but remains controversial. METHODS: An international panel of pancreatic surgeons working in well-known, high-volume centers reviewed the literature and worked together to establish a consensus on when to perform a PD in the absence of positive histology. RESULTS: The incidence of benign disease after PD for a presumed malignancy is 5-13%. Diagnosis by endoscopic cholangiopancreatography brushings and percutaneous fine-needle aspiration are highly specific, but poorly sensitive. Aspiration biopsy guided by endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) has greater sensitivity, but it is highly operator dependent and increases expense. The incidence of autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) in the benign resected specimens is 30-43%. EUS-guided Trucut biopsy, serum levels of immunoglobulin G4, and HISORt (Histology, Imaging, Serology, Other organ involvement, and Response to therapy) are used for diagnosis. If AIP is suspected but not confirmed, the response to a short course of steroids is helpful for diagnosis. CONCLUSION: In the presence of a solid mass suspicious for malignancy, consensus was reached that biopsy proof is not required before proceeding with resection. Confirmation of malignancy, however, is mandatory for patients with borderline resectable disease to be treated with neoadjuvant therapy before exploration for resection. When a diagnosis of AIP is highly suspected, a biopsy is recommended, and a short course of steroid treatment should be considered if the biopsy does not reveal features suspicious for malignancy.

6 Article The relationship between tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate and outcome in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2012

Jamieson, Nigel B / Mohamed, Mohamed / Oien, Karin A / Foulis, Alan K / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, C Ross / McKay, Colin J / McMillan, Donald C. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #22555345.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The tumor-associated inflammatory cell infiltrate is recognized to have prognostic value in various common solid tumors. However, the prognostic value of the tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate has not been established in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) nor has its relationship with the systemic inflammatory response. METHODS: Retrospective study was made of 173 patients who underwent surgery between 1997 and 2009. Routine pathology specimens were scored according to density of the tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate, and biochemical data were collected preoperatively. RESULTS: Low-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate was associated with earlier tumor recurrence (P < 0.001) and particularly in the liver (P = 0.027). It was also associated with T3 tumors (P < 0.05), lymph node involvement (P < 0.05), and resection margin involvement (P < 0.05). On univariate survival analysis, age <65 years (P < 0.05), mGPS (P < 0.001), increased tumor stage (P < 0.01), nodal involvement (P < 0.01), size (P < 0.05), grade (P < 0.05), perineural invasion (P < 0.05), venous invasion (P < 0.01), resection margin involvement (P ≤ 0.001), vascular reconstruction (P < 0.05), and no adjuvant chemotherapy (P < 0.05) were associated with poor survival. In contrast, high-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate was associated with better survival (P < 0.001). On multivariate survival analysis, mGPS [hazard ratio (HR): 1.77, 95% confidence interval (95% CI): 1.19-2.62, P = 0.005], tumor stage (HR: 2.21, 95% CI: 1.16-4.23, P = 0.016), resection margin involvement (HR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.41-3.44, P = 0.001), venous invasion (HR: 1.79, 95% CI: 1.22-2.63, P = 0.003), tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate (HR: 0.37, 95% CI: 0.25-0.55, P = 0.0001), and adjuvant chemotherapy (P = 0.04) were independently prognostic. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the study show, for the first time, that the presence of a high-grade tumor inflammatory cell infiltrate is an independent predictor of prolonged overall survival following resection for PDAC. Furthermore, measures of the local and the systemic inflammatory response were inversely associated.

7 Article A prospective comparison of the prognostic value of tumor- and patient-related factors in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2011

Jamieson, Nigel B / Denley, Simon M / Logue, Jennifer / MacKenzie, Douglas J / Foulis, Alan K / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, Ross / McKay, Colin J / McMillan, Donald C. ·Department of Surgery, Glasgow University, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #21267785.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Outcome prediction after resection with curative intent for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma remains a challenge. There is increasing evidence that the presence of an ongoing systemic inflammatory response is associated with poor outcome in patients undergoing resection for a variety of common solid tumors. Our aim was to prospectively evaluate the prognostic value of tumor- and patient-related factors including the systemic inflammatory response in patients undergoing potentially curative surgery for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma of the head of pancreas. METHODS: The prognostic impact of tumor factors such as stage and host factors, including the systemic inflammatory response (modified Glasgow Prognostic Score [mGPS]), were evaluated in a prospective study of 135 patients who underwent elective pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma from January 2002 to April 2009. RESULTS: In addition to the established tumor-related pathological factors (in particular margin involvement; hazard ratio [HR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65-4.84, P < 0.001), an elevated mGPS (HR 2.26, 95% CI 1.43-3.57, P < 0.001) was independently associated with lower overall survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Additionally, in an adjuvant therapy subgroup of 74 patients, both margin involvement and an elevated mGPS remained independently associated with reduced overall survival. CONCLUSIONS: We have prospectively validated the influence of tumor-related and patient-related factors. Margin involvement and the preoperative mGPS were the most important determinants of overall survival in patients undergoing potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy. Furthermore, both had independent prognostic value in those patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy. In the future, this may be considered a stratification factor for entry onto therapeutic trials.

8 Article Peripancreatic fat invasion is an independent predictor of poor outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2011

Jamieson, Nigel Balfour / Foulis, Alan K / Oien, Karin A / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / Carter, Ross / McKay, Colin J. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #21116727.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), identification of peripancreatic fat tumor invasion promotes a tumor to stage T3. We sought to understand better the impact of histological peripancreatic fat invasion on prognosis and site of recurrence in a cohort of patients with PDAC. METHODS: We analyzed the patient demographics, outcome, and recurrence data that had been prospectively collected in 189 consecutive PDAC undergoing potentially curative pancreaticoduodenectomy between 1996 and 2009. Pathological features were reassessed for all patients. Survival outcome was compared using Kaplan-Meier/Cox proportional hazards analysis. The primary site of recurrence was defined as either locoregional or distant metastases. RESULTS: The median survival of this PDAC cohort was 18.9 months (95% confidence interval (CI) 15.7-22.2). Histological peripancreatic fat invasion was evident in 51 (27%) patients and was associated with lymph node metastases (p = 0.004) and larger tumor size (p = 0.015). The presence of peripancreatic fat invasion was associated with reduced overall survival following resection (12.4 months [95% CI 9.9-15.0]) when compared to those patients with no evidence of fat invasion (22.6 months [95% CI 18.5-26.7]; p < 0.0001). By multivariate survival analysis, independent predictors of overall survival included tumor grade (p = 0.002), lymph node involvement (p = 0.025), resection margin status (p = 0.003), venous invasion (p = 0.045), and peripancreatic fat invasion (p = 0.007). Invasion into the pancreatic fat was significantly associated with the primary site of recurrence being locoregional failure (p = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS: Peripancreatic fat invasion was identified as being an independent predictor of poor outcome following pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC. Additionally, the presence of peripancreatic fat invasion was associated with locoregional disease as the primary site of recurrence. This may have implications for the staging of PDAC and potentially require incorporation into future staging systems to improve outcome stratification.

9 Article Positive mobilization margins alone do not influence survival following pancreatico-duodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2010

Jamieson, Nigel B / Foulis, Alan K / Oien, Karin A / Going, James J / Glen, Paul / Dickson, Euan J / Imrie, Clem W / McKay, Colin J / Carter, Ross. ·West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Department of Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, United Kingdom. nigeljamieson@yahoo.com ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #20485150.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognostic influence of residual tumor at or within 1 mm of the mobilization margins (R1Mobilization) compared with transection margins (R1Transection) following pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). BACKGROUND: The prognostic strength of R1 status increases with frequency of margin positivity and is enhanced by protocol driven pathology reporting. Currently, margins are treated uniformly with tumor at or close to any margin considered of equal prognostic significance. The resection involves a mobilization phase freeing the posterior margin and anterior surface then a transection phase requiring lympho-vascular division forming the medial resection and pancreatic transection margin. The comparative assessment of the relative importance of tumor involvement of these different margins has not previously been investigated. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of 148 consecutive resections for PDAC from 1996-2007 was performed. The individual (pancreatic transection, medial, posterior, and anterior surface) margins were separately identified and analyzed by a senior pathologist. An R1 resection was defined as microscopic evidence of tumor < or = 1 mm from a resection margin. R1Mobilization tumor extension included both R1Anterior and R1Posterior cases; while R1Transection included pancreatic neck/body transection, R1Medial and adjacent transection margins. RESULTS: R1 status was confirmed in 109 patients (74%). The medial (46%) and posterior (44%) margins were most commonly involved. R1 status was found to an independent predictor of poor outcome (P < 0.001). R1Mobilization involvement only (n = 48) was associated with a significantly longer median survival of 18.9 months (95% CI, 13.7-24.8) versus 11.1 months (95% CI, 7.1-15.0) for those with R1Transection tumor involvement (n = 61) (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference in the survival of the R1Mobilization compared with R0 group (P = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS: Following pancreaticoduodenectomy for PDAC, involvement of the transection margins in contrast to mobilization margins defines a group whose outcome is significantly worse. This may impact upon the allocation of adjuvant therapy within the setting of randomized controlled trials.