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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Jeremy L. Humphris
Based on 12 articles published since 2009
(Why 12 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, J. Humphris wrote the following 12 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Editorial Inherited susceptibility to pancreatic cancer in the era of next-generation sequencing. 2015

Humphris, Jeremy / Chang, David K / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Faculty of Medicine, St. Vincent's Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Faculty of Medicine, South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Faculty of Medicine, St. Vincent's Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Faculty of Medicine, South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, Australia. Electronic address: Andrew.Biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #25613311.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

2 Clinical Trial Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial. 2015

Chantrill, Lorraine A / Nagrial, Adnan M / Watson, Clare / Johns, Amber L / Martyn-Smith, Mona / Simpson, Skye / Mead, Scott / Jones, Marc D / Samra, Jaswinder S / Gill, Anthony J / Watson, Nicole / Chin, Venessa T / Humphris, Jeremy L / Chou, Angela / Brown, Belinda / Morey, Adrienne / Pajic, Marina / Grimmond, Sean M / Chang, David K / Thomas, David / Sebastian, Lucille / Sjoquist, Katrin / Yip, Sonia / Pavlakis, Nick / Asghari, Ray / Harvey, Sandra / Grimison, Peter / Simes, John / Biankin, Andrew V / Anonymous5550827 / Anonymous5560827. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk l.chantrill@garvan.org.au. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. · University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Macquarie University Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia. West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Bankstown Cancer Centre, Bankstown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Catalyst Translational Cancer Research Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. Chris O'Brien Lifehouse, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland. Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia. West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk l.chantrill@garvan.org.au. ·Clin Cancer Res · Pubmed #25896973.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). RESULTS: Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. CONCLUSIONS: Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options.

3 Article Lost in translation: returning germline genetic results in genome-scale cancer research. 2017

Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye H / Humphris, Jeremy L / Pinese, Mark / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mead, R Scott / Tucker, Katherine / Andrews, Lesley / Goodwin, Annabel / Leonard, Conrad / High, Hilda A / Nones, Katia / Patch, Ann-Marie / Merrett, Neil D / Pavlakis, Nick / Kassahn, Karin S / Samra, Jaswinder S / Miller, David K / Chang, David K / Pajic, Marina / Anonymous7710904 / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Zeps, Nikolajs / Gill, Anthony J / Biankin, Andrew V. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Sydney, Australia. · St Vincents Hospital, Darlinghurst, Australia. · Western Sydney University Clinical School, Sydney, Australia. · Genetics Department, SEALS Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Sydney, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · Hereditary Cancer Clinic, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Sydney, Australia. · Cancer Genetics Department, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australia. · Sydney Cancer Genetics, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, Australia. · Division of Surgery, School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Royal North Shore Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Women's and Children's Hospital, North Adelaide, Adelaide, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Illumina Inc, 5200 Illumina Way, San Diego, CA, 92122, USA. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, Australia. · University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia. · St John of God Subiaco, Perth, Australia. · School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney Australia and University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Sydney, Australia. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, Australia. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow, UK. andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Genome Med · Pubmed #28454591.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The return of research results (RoR) remains a complex and well-debated issue. Despite the debate, actual data related to the experience of giving individual results back, and the impact these results may have on clinical care and health outcomes, is sorely lacking. Through the work of the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative (APGI) we: (1) delineate the pathway back to the patient where actionable research data were identified; and (2) report the clinical utilisation of individual results returned. Using this experience, we discuss barriers and opportunities associated with a comprehensive process of RoR in large-scale genomic research that may be useful for others developing their own policies. METHODS: We performed whole-genome (n = 184) and exome (n = 208) sequencing of matched tumour-normal DNA pairs from 392 patients with sporadic pancreatic cancer (PC) as part of the APGI. We identified pathogenic germline mutations in candidate genes (n = 130) with established predisposition to PC or medium-high penetrance genes with well-defined cancer associated syndromes or phenotypes. Variants from candidate genes were annotated and classified according to international guidelines. Variants were considered actionable if clinical utility was established, with regard to prevention, diagnosis, prognostication and/or therapy. RESULTS: A total of 48,904 germline variants were identified, with 2356 unique variants undergoing annotation and in silico classification. Twenty cases were deemed actionable and were returned via previously described RoR framework, representing an actionable finding rate of 5.1%. Overall, 1.78% of our cohort experienced clinical benefit from RoR. CONCLUSION: Returning research results within the context of large-scale genomics research is a labour-intensive, highly variable, complex operation. Results that warrant action are not infrequent, but the prevalence of those who experience a clinical difference as a result of returning individual results is currently low.

4 Article Whole-genome landscape of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2017

Scarpa, Aldo / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Corbo, Vincenzo / Patch, Ann-Marie / Bailey, Peter / Lawlor, Rita T / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Mafficini, Andrea / Rusev, Borislav / Scardoni, Maria / Antonello, Davide / Barbi, Stefano / Sikora, Katarzyna O / Cingarlini, Sara / Vicentini, Caterina / McKay, Skye / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / McLean, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nagaraj, Shivashankar Hiriyur / Amato, Eliana / Dalai, Irene / Bersani, Samantha / Cataldo, Ivana / Dei Tos, Angelo P / Capelli, Paola / Davì, Maria Vittoria / Landoni, Luca / Malpaga, Anna / Miotto, Marco / Whitehall, Vicki L J / Leggett, Barbara A / Harris, Janelle L / Harris, Jonathan / Jones, Marc D / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Nagrial, Adnan M / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia / Rooman, Ilse / Toon, Christopher / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark / Barbour, Andrew / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Lovell, Jessica A / Jamieson, Nigel B / Duthie, Fraser / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Fisher, William E / Dagg, Rebecca A / Lau, Loretta M S / Lee, Michael / Pickett, Hilda A / Reddel, Roger R / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Zeps, Nikolajs / Falconi, Massimo / Simbolo, Michele / Butturini, Giovanni / Van Buren, George / Partelli, Stefano / Fassan, Matteo / Anonymous7980896 / Khanna, Kum Kum / Gill, Anthony J / Wheeler, David A / Gibbs, Richard A / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bassi, Claudio / Tortora, Giampaolo / Pederzoli, Paolo / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1QH, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Medical Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Pathology, General Hospital of Treviso, Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Italy. · Department of Medicine, Section of Endocrinology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · The University of Queensland, School of Medicine, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Pathology Queensland, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · Institute of Health Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Key Laboratory of Carcinogenesis and Translational Research (Ministry of Education/Beijing), Centre for Cancer Bioinformatics, Peking University Cancer Hospital &Institute, Beijing 100142, China. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · Department of Anatomical Pathology. St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · Department of Pathology, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Michael E. DeBakey Department of Surgery and The Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Children's Hospital at Westmead, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Sydney, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney. Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. · St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, 3010, Victoria, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #28199314.

ABSTRACT: The diagnosis of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (PanNETs) is increasing owing to more sensitive detection methods, and this increase is creating challenges for clinical management. We performed whole-genome sequencing of 102 primary PanNETs and defined the genomic events that characterize their pathogenesis. Here we describe the mutational signatures they harbour, including a deficiency in G:C > T:A base excision repair due to inactivation of MUTYH, which encodes a DNA glycosylase. Clinically sporadic PanNETs contain a larger-than-expected proportion of germline mutations, including previously unreported mutations in the DNA repair genes MUTYH, CHEK2 and BRCA2. Together with mutations in MEN1 and VHL, these mutations occur in 17% of patients. Somatic mutations, including point mutations and gene fusions, were commonly found in genes involved in four main pathways: chromatin remodelling, DNA damage repair, activation of mTOR signalling (including previously undescribed EWSR1 gene fusions), and telomere maintenance. In addition, our gene expression analyses identified a subgroup of tumours associated with hypoxia and HIF signalling.

5 Article Hypermutation In Pancreatic Cancer. 2017

Humphris, Jeremy L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Nones, Katia / Bailey, Peter J / Johns, Amber L / McKay, Skye / Chang, David K / Miller, David K / Pajic, Marina / Kassahn, Karin S / Quinn, Michael C J / Bruxner, Timothy J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Stone, Andrew / Wilson, Peter J / Anderson, Matthew / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Mead, Ronald S / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / McKay, Colin J / Carter, C Ross / Dickson, Euan J / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Grützmann, Robert / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Rusev, Borislav / Corbo, Vincenzo / Salvia, Roberto / Cataldo, Ivana / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous5740887 / Hofmann, Oliver / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Gill, Anthony J / Pearson, John V / Grimmond, Sean M / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Genetic and Molecular Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia; School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Eastern Area Laboratory Services Pathology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, New South Wales, Australia; Sonic Genetics, Douglass Hanly Moir Pathology, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; School of Medicine, Western Sydney University, Penrith, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fiona Stanley Hospital, Murdoch, Washington. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woollongabba, Queensland, Australia. · School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Australia and St John of God Pathology, Subiaco, Washington. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow & Clyde National Health Service, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Greater Glasgow and Clyde Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow, United Kingdom; Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Department of Medicine, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California. · Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom. · Universitätsklinikum Erlangen, Department of Surgery, University of Erlangen-Nueremberg, Germany. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: nic.waddell@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom; Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia; South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales Australia, Liverpool, New South Wales, Australia; West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, United Kingdom. Electronic address: andrew.biankin@glasgow.ac.uk. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27856273.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is molecularly diverse, with few effective therapies. Increased mutation burden and defective DNA repair are associated with response to immune checkpoint inhibitors in several other cancer types. We interrogated 385 pancreatic cancer genomes to define hypermutation and its causes. Mutational signatures inferring defects in DNA repair were enriched in those with the highest mutation burdens. Mismatch repair deficiency was identified in 1% of tumors harboring different mechanisms of somatic inactivation of MLH1 and MSH2. Defining mutation load in individual pancreatic cancers and the optimal assay for patient selection may inform clinical trial design for immunotherapy in pancreatic cancer.

6 Article Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Pancreatic Cancer. 2016

Humphris, Jeremy L / Biankin, Andrew V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Research Program, 370 Victoria St., Darlinghurst, NSW, 2010, Australia. j.humphris@garvan.org.au. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Research Program, 370 Victoria St., Darlinghurst, NSW, 2010, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow, Bearsden, G61 1BD, United Kingdom. ·Recent Results Cancer Res · Pubmed #27075349.

ABSTRACT: Hereditary pancreatic cancer can be diagnosed through family history and/or a personal history of pancreatitis or clinical features suggesting one of the known pancreatic cancer predisposition syndromes. This chapter describes the currently known hereditary pancreatic cancer predisposition syndromes, including Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, familial atypical multiple mole melanoma, hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, Li-Fraumeni syndrome, hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer and familial adenomatous polyposis. Strategies for genetic testing for hereditary pancreatic cancer and the appropriate options for surveillance and cancer risk reduction are discussed. Finally, ongoing research and future directions in the diagnosis and management of hereditary pancreatic cancer will be considered.

7 Article Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer. 2016

Bailey, Peter / Chang, David K / Nones, Katia / Johns, Amber L / Patch, Ann-Marie / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Miller, David K / Christ, Angelika N / Bruxner, Tim J C / Quinn, Michael C / Nourse, Craig / Murtaugh, L Charles / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Fink, Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Chin, Venessa / Anderson, Matthew J / Kazakoff, Stephen / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wilson, Peter J / Cloonan, Nicole / Kassahn, Karin S / Taylor, Darrin / Quek, Kelly / Robertson, Alan / Pantano, Lorena / Mincarelli, Laura / Sanchez, Luis N / Evers, Lisa / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Humphris, Jeremy / Chou, Angela / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher W / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Moran-Jones, Kim / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Duthie, Fraser / Oien, Karin / Hair, Jane / Grützmann, Robert / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Rusev, Borislav / Capelli, Paola / Salvia, Roberto / Tortora, Giampaolo / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Petersen, Gloria M / Anonymous91128 / Munzy, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Karim, Saadia A / Eshleman, James R / Hruban, Ralph H / Pilarsky, Christian / Morton, Jennifer P / Sansom, Owen J / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo / Hofmann, Oliver / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Gill, Anthony J / Gibbs, Richard A / Pearson, John V / Waddell, Nicola / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia. · South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston, Queensland 4006, Australia. · Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Michael DeBakey Department of Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. · Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA. · Genetic and Molecular Pathology, SA Pathology, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · School of Biological Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Harvard Chan Bioinformatics Core, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. · Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown Hospital, New South Wales 2560, Australia. · Department of Pathology. SydPath, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2052, Australia. · School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia. · University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown New South Wales 2050, Australia. · School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Fiona Stanley Hospital, Robin Warren Drive, Murdoch, Western Australia 6150, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Nedlands 6009, Australia and St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Department of Pathology, Southern General Hospital, Greater Glasgow &Clyde NHS, Glasgow G51 4TF, UK. · GGC Bio-repository, Pathology Department, Southern General Hospital, 1345 Govan Road, Glasgow G51 4TY, UK. · Department of Surgery, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · ARC-Net Applied Research on Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905, USA. · Elkins Pancreas Center, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS226, Houston, Texas 77030-3411, USA. · Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · Institute for Cancer Science, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ, UK. · University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #26909576.

ABSTRACT: Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

8 Article Whole genomes redefine the mutational landscape of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Waddell, Nicola / Pajic, Marina / Patch, Ann-Marie / Chang, David K / Kassahn, Karin S / Bailey, Peter / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David / Nones, Katia / Quek, Kelly / Quinn, Michael C J / Robertson, Alan J / Fadlullah, Muhammad Z H / Bruxner, Tim J C / Christ, Angelika N / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Manning, Suzanne / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Wani, Shivangi / Wilson, Peter J / Markham, Emma / Cloonan, Nicole / Anderson, Matthew J / Fink, J Lynn / Holmes, Oliver / Kazakoff, Stephen H / Leonard, Conrad / Newell, Felicity / Poudel, Barsha / Song, Sarah / Taylor, Darrin / Waddell, Nick / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Wu, Jianmin / Pinese, Mark / Cowley, Mark J / Lee, Hong C / Jones, Marc D / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphris, Jeremy / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Chin, Venessa / Steinmann, Angela M / Mawson, Amanda / Humphrey, Emily S / Colvin, Emily K / Chou, Angela / Scarlett, Christopher J / Pinho, Andreia V / Giry-Laterriere, Marc / Rooman, Ilse / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Pettitt, Jessica A / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Jamieson, Nigel B / Graham, Janet S / Niclou, Simone P / Bjerkvig, Rolf / Grützmann, Robert / Aust, Daniela / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Corbo, Vincenzo / Bassi, Claudio / Falconi, Massimo / Zamboni, Giuseppe / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Anonymous400822 / Gill, Anthony J / Eshleman, James R / Pilarsky, Christian / Scarpa, Aldo / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Pearson, John V / Biankin, Andrew V / Grimmond, Sean M. ·1] Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Herston Road, Brisbane 4006, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia [3] South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Liverpool, New South Wales 2170, Australia [4] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · 1] Queensland Centre for Medical Genomics, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland 4072, Australia [2] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] Department of Anatomical Pathology, St Vincent's Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] School of Environmental &Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, New South Wales 2258, Australia. · 1] Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, New South Wales 2065, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia [3] Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · 1] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney, New South Wales 2200, Australia [2] School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, New South Wales 2175, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Fremantle Hospital, Alma Street, Fremantle, Western Australia 6160, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Ipswich Rd, Woollongabba, Queensland 4102, Australia. · 1] School of Surgery M507, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Nedlands 6009, Australia [2] St John of God Pathology, 12 Salvado Rd, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia [3] Bendat Family Comprehensive Cancer Centre, St John of God Subiaco Hospital, Subiaco, Western Australia 6008, Australia. · 1] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK [2] Academic Unit of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medical, Veterinary and Life Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G4 OSF, UK [3] West of Scotland Pancreatic Unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow G31 2ER, UK. · 1] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK [2] Department of Medical Oncology, Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, 1053 Great Western Road, Glasgow G12 0YN, UK. · Norlux Neuro-Oncology Laboratory, CRP-Santé Luxembourg, 84 Val Fleuri, L-1526, Luxembourg. · Norlux Neuro-Oncology, Department of Biomedicine, University of Bergen, Jonas Lies vei 91, N-5019 Bergen, Norway. · Departments of Surgery and Pathology, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany. · Department of Pathology, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · Departments of Pathology and Translational Molecular Pathology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston Texas 77030, USA. · The David M. Rubenstein Pancreatic Cancer Research Center and Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. · Department of Surgery, The Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231, USA. · 1] ARC-NET Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · ARC-NET Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · 1] Department of Surgery and Oncology, Pancreas Institute, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Negrar, Verona 37024, Italy. · 1] Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy [2] Departments of Surgery and Pathology, Ospedale Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Negrar, Verona 37024, Italy. · Department of Oncology, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona 37134, Italy. · Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, California 94122, USA. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Division, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, University of New South Wales, 384 Victoria St, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia [2] University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006, Australia. · Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Bearsden, Glasgow G61 1BD, UK. ·Nature · Pubmed #25719666.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal of malignancies and a major health burden. We performed whole-genome sequencing and copy number variation (CNV) analysis of 100 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs). Chromosomal rearrangements leading to gene disruption were prevalent, affecting genes known to be important in pancreatic cancer (TP53, SMAD4, CDKN2A, ARID1A and ROBO2) and new candidate drivers of pancreatic carcinogenesis (KDM6A and PREX2). Patterns of structural variation (variation in chromosomal structure) classified PDACs into 4 subtypes with potential clinical utility: the subtypes were termed stable, locally rearranged, scattered and unstable. A significant proportion harboured focal amplifications, many of which contained druggable oncogenes (ERBB2, MET, FGFR1, CDK6, PIK3R3 and PIK3CA), but at low individual patient prevalence. Genomic instability co-segregated with inactivation of DNA maintenance genes (BRCA1, BRCA2 or PALB2) and a mutational signature of DNA damage repair deficiency. Of 8 patients who received platinum therapy, 4 of 5 individuals with these measures of defective DNA maintenance responded.

9 Article Clinical and pathologic features of familial pancreatic cancer. 2014

Humphris, Jeremy L / Johns, Amber L / Simpson, Skye H / Cowley, Mark J / Pajic, Marina / Chang, David K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Pinese, Mark / Mead, R Scott / Gill, Anthony J / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Tucker, Katherine M / Spigelman, Allan D / Waddell, Nic / Grimmond, Sean M / Biankin, Andrew V / Anonymous2030809. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Center, Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, New South Wales, Australia. ·Cancer · Pubmed #25313458.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Inherited predisposition to pancreatic cancer contributes significantly to its incidence and presents an opportunity for the development of early detection strategies. The genetic basis of predisposition remains unexplained in a high proportion of patients with familial PC (FPC). METHODS: Clinicopathologic features were assessed in a cohort of 766 patients who had been diagnosed with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PC). Patients were classified with FPC if they had ≥1 affected first-degree relatives; otherwise, they were classified with sporadic PC (SPC). RESULTS: The prevalence of FPC in this cohort was 8.9%. In FPC families with an affected parent-child pair, 71% in the subsequent generation were 12.3 years younger at diagnosis. Patients with FPC had more first-degree relatives who had an extrapancreatic malignancy (EPM) (42.6% vs 21.2; P<.0001), particularly melanoma and endometrial cancer, but not a personal history of EPM. Patients with SPC were more likely to be active smokers, have higher cumulative tobacco exposure, and have fewer multifocal precursor lesions, but these were not associated with differences in survival. Long-standing diabetes mellitus (>2 years) was associated with poor survival in both groups. CONCLUSIONS: FPC represents 9% of PC, and the risk of malignancy in kindred does not appear to be confined to the pancreas. Patients with FPC have more precursor lesions and include fewer active smokers, but other clinicopathologic factors and outcome are similar to those in patients with SPC. Furthermore, some FPC kindreds may exhibit anticipation. A better understanding of the clinical features of PC will facilitate efforts to uncover novel susceptibility genes and the development of early detection strategies.

10 Article Adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with pancreatic cancer. 2014

Nagrial, A M / Chang, D K / Nguyen, N Q / Johns, A L / Chantrill, L A / Humphris, J L / Chin, V T / Samra, J S / Gill, A J / Pajic, M / Anonymous2940776 / Pinese, M / Colvin, E K / Scarlett, C J / Chou, A / Kench, J G / Sutherland, R L / Horvath, L G / Biankin, A V. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Surgery, Bankstown Hospital, Eldridge Road, Bankstown, Sydney NSW 2200, Australia [3] South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of NSW, Liverpool NSW 2170, Australia [4] Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Garscube Estate, Switchback Road, Glasgow G61 1BD, Scotland, UK. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centre, Campbelltown, NSW 2560, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia. · 1] Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, Sydney, NSW 2065, Australia [2] Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006; Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] School of Environmental and Life Sciences, University of Newcastle, Ourimbah, NSW 2258, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent's Hospital, Darlinghurst, Sydney, NSW 2010, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] St Vincent's Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · 1] The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, and the Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, 384 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney NSW 2010, Australia [2] Department of Medical Oncology, Sydney Cancer Centre, Sydney, NSW 2050, Australia. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #24263063.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Adjuvant chemotherapy improves survival for patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Elderly patients are under-represented in Phase III clinical trials, and as a consequence the efficacy of adjuvant therapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer is not clear. We aimed to assess the use and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy in older patients with pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We assessed a community cohort of 439 patients with a diagnosis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma who underwent operative resection in centres associated with the Australian Pancreatic Cancer Genome Initiative. RESULTS: The median age of the cohort was 67 years. Overall only 47% of all patients received adjuvant therapy. Patients who received adjuvant chemotherapy were predominantly younger, had later stage disease, more lymph node involvement and more evidence of perineural invasion than the group that did not receive adjuvant treatment. Overall, adjuvant chemotherapy was associated with prolonged survival (median 22.1 vs 15.8 months; P<0.0001). Older patients (aged ≥70) were less likely to receive adjuvant chemotherapy (51.5% vs 29.8%; P<0.0001). Older patients had a particularly poor outcome when adjuvant therapy was not delivered (median survival=13.1 months; HR 1.89, 95% CI: 1.27-2.78, P=0.002). CONCLUSION: Patients aged ≥70 are less likely to receive adjuvant therapy although it is associated with improved outcome. Increased use of adjuvant therapy in older individuals is encouraged as they constitute a large proportion of patients with pancreatic cancer.

11 Article Pancreatic cancer genomes reveal aberrations in axon guidance pathway genes. 2012

Biankin, Andrew V / Waddell, Nicola / Kassahn, Karin S / Gingras, Marie-Claude / Muthuswamy, Lakshmi B / Johns, Amber L / Miller, David K / Wilson, Peter J / Patch, Ann-Marie / Wu, Jianmin / Chang, David K / Cowley, Mark J / Gardiner, Brooke B / Song, Sarah / Harliwong, Ivon / Idrisoglu, Senel / Nourse, Craig / Nourbakhsh, Ehsan / Manning, Suzanne / Wani, Shivangi / Gongora, Milena / Pajic, Marina / Scarlett, Christopher J / Gill, Anthony J / Pinho, Andreia V / Rooman, Ilse / Anderson, Matthew / Holmes, Oliver / Leonard, Conrad / Taylor, Darrin / Wood, Scott / Xu, Qinying / Nones, Katia / Fink, J Lynn / Christ, Angelika / Bruxner, Tim / Cloonan, Nicole / Kolle, Gabriel / Newell, Felicity / Pinese, Mark / Mead, R Scott / Humphris, Jeremy L / Kaplan, Warren / Jones, Marc D / Colvin, Emily K / Nagrial, Adnan M / Humphrey, Emily S / Chou, Angela / Chin, Venessa T / Chantrill, Lorraine A / Mawson, Amanda / Samra, Jaswinder S / Kench, James G / Lovell, Jessica A / Daly, Roger J / Merrett, Neil D / Toon, Christopher / Epari, Krishna / Nguyen, Nam Q / Barbour, Andrew / Zeps, Nikolajs / Anonymous1421514 / Kakkar, Nipun / Zhao, Fengmei / Wu, Yuan Qing / Wang, Min / Muzny, Donna M / Fisher, William E / Brunicardi, F Charles / Hodges, Sally E / Reid, Jeffrey G / Drummond, Jennifer / Chang, Kyle / Han, Yi / Lewis, Lora R / Dinh, Huyen / Buhay, Christian J / Beck, Timothy / Timms, Lee / Sam, Michelle / Begley, Kimberly / Brown, Andrew / Pai, Deepa / Panchal, Ami / Buchner, Nicholas / De Borja, Richard / Denroche, Robert E / Yung, Christina K / Serra, Stefano / Onetto, Nicole / Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata / Tsao, Ming-Sound / Shaw, Patricia A / Petersen, Gloria M / Gallinger, Steven / Hruban, Ralph H / Maitra, Anirban / Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A / Schulick, Richard D / Wolfgang, Christopher L / Morgan, Richard A / Lawlor, Rita T / Capelli, Paola / Corbo, Vincenzo / Scardoni, Maria / Tortora, Giampaolo / Tempero, Margaret A / Mann, Karen M / Jenkins, Nancy A / Perez-Mancera, Pedro A / Adams, David J / Largaespada, David A / Wessels, Lodewyk F A / Rust, Alistair G / Stein, Lincoln D / Tuveson, David A / Copeland, Neal G / Musgrove, Elizabeth A / Scarpa, Aldo / Eshleman, James R / Hudson, Thomas J / Sutherland, Robert L / Wheeler, David A / Pearson, John V / McPherson, John D / Gibbs, Richard A / Grimmond, Sean M. ·The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, 370 Victoria Street, Darlinghurst, Sydney, New South Wales 2010, Australia. ·Nature · Pubmed #23103869.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer is a highly lethal malignancy with few effective therapies. We performed exome sequencing and copy number analysis to define genomic aberrations in a prospectively accrued clinical cohort (n = 142) of early (stage I and II) sporadic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Detailed analysis of 99 informative tumours identified substantial heterogeneity with 2,016 non-silent mutations and 1,628 copy-number variations. We define 16 significantly mutated genes, reaffirming known mutations (KRAS, TP53, CDKN2A, SMAD4, MLL3, TGFBR2, ARID1A and SF3B1), and uncover novel mutated genes including additional genes involved in chromatin modification (EPC1 and ARID2), DNA damage repair (ATM) and other mechanisms (ZIM2, MAP2K4, NALCN, SLC16A4 and MAGEA6). Integrative analysis with in vitro functional data and animal models provided supportive evidence for potential roles for these genetic aberrations in carcinogenesis. Pathway-based analysis of recurrently mutated genes recapitulated clustering in core signalling pathways in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and identified new mutated genes in each pathway. We also identified frequent and diverse somatic aberrations in genes described traditionally as embryonic regulators of axon guidance, particularly SLIT/ROBO signalling, which was also evident in murine Sleeping Beauty transposon-mediated somatic mutagenesis models of pancreatic cancer, providing further supportive evidence for the potential involvement of axon guidance genes in pancreatic carcinogenesis.

12 Article The prognostic and predictive value of serum CA19.9 in pancreatic cancer. 2012

Humphris, J L / Chang, D K / Johns, A L / Scarlett, C J / Pajic, M / Jones, M D / Colvin, E K / Nagrial, A / Chin, V T / Chantrill, L A / Samra, J S / Gill, A J / Kench, J G / Merrett, N D / Das, A / Musgrove, E A / Sutherland, R L / Biankin, A V / Anonymous2400715. ·Cancer Research Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Australia. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #22241899.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Current staging methods for pancreatic cancer (PC) are inadequate, and biomarkers to aid clinical decision making are lacking. Despite the availability of the serum marker carbohydrate antigen 19.9 (CA19.9) for over two decades, its precise role in the management of PC is yet to be defined, and as a consequence, it is not widely used. METHODS: We assessed the relationship between perioperative serum CA19.9 levels, survival and adjuvant chemotherapeutic responsiveness in a cohort of 260 patients who underwent operative resection for PC. RESULTS: By specifically assessing the subgroup of patients with detectable CA19.9, we identified potential utility at key clinical decision points. Low postoperative CA19.9 at 3 months (median survival 25.6 vs 14.8 months, P=0.0052) and before adjuvant chemotherapy were independent prognostic factors. Patients with postoperative CA 19.9 levels>90 U/ml did not benefit from adjuvant chemotherapy (P=0.7194) compared with those with a CA19.9 of ≤90 U/ml (median 26.0 vs 16.7 months, P=0.0108). Normalization of CA19.9 within 6 months of resection was also an independent favorable prognostic factor (median 29.9 vs 14.8 months, P=0.0004) and normal perioperative CA19.9 levels identified a good prognostic group, which was associated with a 5-year survival of 42%. CONCLUSIONS: Perioperative serum CA19.9 measurements are informative in patients with detectable CA19.9 (defined by serum levels of >5 U/ml) and have potential clinical utility in predicting outcome and response to adjuvant chemotherapy. Future clinical trials should prioritize incorporation of CA19.9 measurement at key decision points to prospectively validate these findings and facilitate implementation.