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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Yeqian Huang
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Yeqian Huang wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Impact of perioperative fluid administration on early outcomes after pancreatoduodenectomy: A meta-analysis. 2017

Huang, Yeqian / Chua, Terence C / Gill, Anthony J / Samra, Jaswinder S. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: terence.c.chua@gmail.com. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Department of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia; Discipline of Surgery, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia; Macquarie University Hospital, Macquarie University, NSW, Australia. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #28285959.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) remains a technically challenging surgical procedure with morbidity rates ranging between 30 and 50%. It is suggested that the liberal use of fluids is associated with a poor perioperative outcome. This review examines the impact of fluid administration on outcomes after PD. METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed database (June 1966-June 2016). Studies identified were appraised with standard selection criteria. Data points were extracted and meta-analysis was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA). RESULTS: Eleven studies, seven retrospective trials and four randomized control trials comprising 2842 patients were included. Seven studies were meta-analyzed. There was no difference in length of hospital stay (P = 0.25), pancreas specific complications (P = 0.20), pulmonary (P = 0.58), cardiovascular (P = 0.75), gastrointestinal (P = 0.49), hepatobiliary (P = 0.53), urogenital (P = 0.42), wound complication (P = 0.79), reoperation rate (P = 0.69), overall morbidity (P = 0.18), major morbidity (P = 0.91), 30-day mortality (P = 0.07) and 90-day mortality (P = 0.58) in low or high fluid groups. CONCLUSION: The current available data fails to demonstrate an association between the amount of perioperative intravenous fluid administration and postoperative complications in patients undergoing PD.

2 Article Pancreatoduodenectomy and the risk of complications from perioperative fluid administration. 2018

Gill, Preetjote / Chua, Terence C / Huang, Yeqian / Mehta, Shreya / Mittal, Anubhav / Gill, Anthony J / Samra, Jaswinder S. ·Department of Upper Gastrointestinal Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Deparment of Anatomical Pathology, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Macquarie University Hospital, Macquarie University, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ·ANZ J Surg · Pubmed #28239944.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The dogma of administering sufficient intravenous fluids aggressively to avoid under-resuscitation has recently been challenged. Evidence suggests that excessive perioperative fluid administration may be associated with negative clinical outcomes in gastrointestinal surgery. This study examines the impact of fluid administration on perioperative outcomes in patients undergoing pancreatoduodenectomy (PD). METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 202 patients undergoing PD between January 2004 and August 2015 was performed. A cut-off value of 10 mL/kg/h was applied (low fluid group: <10 mL/kg/h versus high fluid group: ≥10 mL/kg/h). RESULTS: There were 76 patients in the low fluid group and 126 patients in the high fluid group. Both groups had comparable age, American Society of Anesthesiologists score and preoperative morbidity rates. Patients in the high fluid group received significantly more total fluids, crystalloids and colloids intraoperatively (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001 and P = 0.013, respectively) without a significant difference in estimated blood loss (P = 0.586). The net fluid balance on post-operative day 0 was also significantly higher in the high fluid group (P < 0.0001). The mortality rate was 0% in the cohort. Major morbidity rate was 46.1% and 44.4% in low and high fluid groups, respectively (P = 0.836). Reoperation rate was 5.3% for the low fluid group and 1.6% for the high fluid group (P = 0.136). There were no significant differences between the groups for any of the individual complications. CONCLUSION: This study did not identify a difference in post-operative outcomes between the low and high fluid regime in patients undergoing PD.