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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Sven Petter Haugvik
Based on 21 articles published since 2010
(Why 21 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, S-P Haugvik wrote the following 21 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Pathology and Surgical Treatment of High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: an Evolving Landscape. 2016

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Kaemmerer, Daniel / Gaujoux, Sebastien / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Verbeke, Caroline Sophie / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Postbox 4950, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Postbox 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Postbox 800, 3004, Drammen, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Robert-Koch-Allee 9, Bad Berka, 99437, Germany. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, Cochin Hospital, APHP, Université Paris Descartes, 27, rue du Faubourg Saint Jacques, 74014, Paris, France. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Postbox 4950, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Postbox 1171, Blindern, 0318, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Postbox 4956, Nydalen, 0424, Oslo, Norway. ·Curr Oncol Rep · Pubmed #26984415.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) are rare, accounting for less than 5% of all pancreatic tumors. High-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (hgPNECs) represent about 5% of all PNENs. They show highly aggressive behavior with dismal prognosis. Throughout the last two decades, there has been a notable progress in basic and clinical research of PNENs and a therapeutic trend towards both more aggressive and minimally invasive surgery. Despite these advances, hgPNECs as a distinct clinical entity remains largely unexplored among surgeons. This review of current development in pathology reporting and surgical treatment of hgPNECs aims at increasing the awareness of an evolving field in pancreatic surgery.

2 Review Diabetes, smoking, alcohol use, and family history of cancer as risk factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a systematic review and meta-analysis. 2015

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hedenström, Per / Korsæth, Emilie / Valente, Roberto / Hayes, Alastair / Siuka, Darko / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Lindkvist, Björn / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #25613442.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Risk factors for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are not well understood. The aim of this systematic review was to assess if diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol use, and family history of cancer are risk factors for PNETs. METHODS: MEDLINE and abstracts from the European and North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Societies (ENETS and NANETS) were searched for studies published until October 2013. Eligible studies were selected according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. RESULTS: Five studies evaluating 4 individual populations were included (study accrual period 2000-2011) into the meta-analysis, involving 827 cases (range 160-309 per study) and 2,407 controls (range 233-924 per study). All studies had a case-control design and described regional series. The pooled adjusted odds ratio was 2.74 (95% CI: 1.63-4.62; p < 0.01; I(2) = 60.4%) for history of diabetes, 1.21 (95% CI: 0.92-1.58; p = 0.18; I(2) = 45.8%) for ever smoking, 1.37 (95% CI: 0.99-1.91; p = 0.06; I(2) = 0.0%) for heavy smoking, 1.09 (95% CI: 0.64-1.85; p = 0.75; I(2) = 85.2%) for ever alcohol use, 2.72 (95% CI: 1.25-5.91; p = 0.01; I(2) = 57.8%) for heavy alcohol use, and 2.16 (95% CI: 1.64-2.85; p < 0.01; I(2) = 0.0%) for first-degree family history of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes mellitus and first-degree family history of cancer are associated with an increased risk of sporadic PNET. There was also a trend for diagnosis of sporadic PNET associated with heavy smoking. Alcohol use may be a risk factor for PNET, but there was considerable heterogeneity in the meta-analysis. These results suggest the need for a larger, homogeneous, international study for the clarification of risk factors for the occurrence of PNET.

3 Review Pancreatic surgery with vascular reconstruction in patients with locally advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2013

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Waage, Anne / Line, Pål-Dag / Mathisen, Øystein / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0372, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no ·J Gastrointest Surg · Pubmed #23670519.

ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) are rare neoplasms with better prognosis than most pancreatic malignancies. Surgery of locally advanced PNET remains controversial, and the role of vascular reconstruction in this patient group has yet to be defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and outcome of pancreatic resections with vascular reconstruction in patients with locally advanced PNET. METHODS: Retrospective analysis of patients who underwent pancreatic surgery with vascular reconstruction for locally advanced PNET at a single institution. Furthermore, a review of the relevant literature on the topic was performed. RESULTS: Seven patients who had undergone vascular reconstruction for locally advanced PNET were identified. Four patients had liver metastases at time of surgery. Postoperative complications developed in four patients with no mortality. Median follow-up time of all patients was 21 (range, 3-58) months. Three patients had disease in remission after 58, 42 and 3 months, respectively. One patient died 35 months postoperatively due to progressive disease, whereas three patients had progression of disease after 21, 9, and 4 months postoperatively. CONCLUSION: Pancreatic surgery with vascular reconstruction in patients with locally advanced PNET is feasible with acceptable outcome.

4 Review Surgical treatment of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: a state of the art review. 2012

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Edwin, Bjørn / Mathisen, Øystein / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0372 Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no ·ScientificWorldJournal · Pubmed #23304085.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) are rare neoplasms. They are clinically diverse and divided into functioning and nonfunctioning disease, depending on their ability to produce symptoms due to hormone production. Surgical resection is the only curative treatment and remains the cornerstone therapy for this patient group, even in patients with advanced disease. Over the last decade there has been a noticeable trend towards more aggressive surgery as well as more minimally invasive surgery in patients with PNETs. This has resulted in improved long-term survival in patients with locally advanced and metastatic disease treated aggressively, as well as shorter hospital stays and comparable long-term outcomes in patients with limited disease treated minimally invasively. There are still controversies related to issues of surgical treatment of PNETs, such as to what extent enucleation, lymph node sampling, and vascular reconstruction are beneficial for the oncologic outcome. Histopathologic tumor classification is of high clinical importance for treatment planning and prognostic evaluation of patients with PNETs. A constant challenge, which relates to the treatment of PNETs, is the lack of an internationally accepted histopathological classification system. This paper reviews current issues on the surgical treatment of sporadic PNETs with specific focus on surgical approaches and tumor classification.

5 Article Portal vein reconstruction using primary anastomosis or venous interposition allograft in pancreatic surgery. 2018

Kleive, Dyre / Berstad, Audun Elnaes / Sahakyan, Mushegh A / Verbeke, Caroline S / Naper, Christian / Haugvik, Sven Petter / Gladhaug, Ivar P / Line, Pål-Dag / Labori, Knut Jørgen. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: dyrkle@ous-hf.no. · Department of Radiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Pathology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Immunology and Transfusion Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Transplantation Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·J Vasc Surg Venous Lymphat Disord · Pubmed #29128301.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Superior mesenteric vein/portal vein (SMV/PV) resection and reconstruction during pancreatic surgery are increasingly common. Several reconstruction techniques exist. The aim of this study was to evaluate characteristics of patients and clinical outcomes for SMV/PV reconstruction using interposed cold-stored cadaveric venous allograft (AG+) or primary end-to-end anastomosis (AG-) after segmental vein resections during pancreatic surgery. METHODS: All patients undergoing pancreatic surgery with SMV/PV resection and reconstruction from 2006 to 2015 were identified. Clinical and histopathologic outcomes as well as preoperative and postoperative radiologic findings were assessed. RESULTS: A total of 171 patients were identified. The study included 42 and 71 patients reconstructed with AG+ and AG-, respectively. Patients in the AG+ group had longer mean operative time (506 minutes [standard deviation, 83 minutes] for AG+ vs 420 minutes [standard deviation, 91 minutes] for AG-; P < .01) and more intraoperative bleeding (median, 1000 mL [interquartile range (IQR), 650-2200 mL] for AG+ vs 600 mL [IQR, 300-1000 mL] for AG-; P < .01). Neoadjuvant therapy was administered more frequently for patients in the AG+ group (23.8% vs 8.5%; P = .02). Patients with AG+ had a longer length of tumor-vein involvement (median, 2.4 cm [IQR, 1.6-3.0 cm] for AG+ vs 1.8 cm [IQR, 1.2-2.4 cm] for AG-; P = .01), and a higher number of patients had a tumor-vein interface >180 degrees (35.7% for AG+ vs 21.1% for AG-; P = .02). There was no difference in number of patients with major complications (42.9% for AG+ vs 36.6% for AG-; P = .51) or early failure at the reconstruction site (9.5% for AG+ vs 8.5% for AG-; P = 1). A subgroup analysis of 10 patients in the AG+ group revealed the presence of donor-specific antibodies in all patients. CONCLUSIONS: The short-term outcome of SMV/PV reconstruction with interposed cold-stored cadaveric venous allografts is comparable to that of reconstruction with primary end-to-end anastomosis. Graft rejection could be a contributing factor to severe stenosis in patients reconstructed with allograft.

6 Article Prognosis of sporadic resected small (≤2 cm) nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors - a multi-institutional study. 2018

Sallinen, Ville J / Le Large, Tessa Y S / Tieftrunk, Elke / Galeev, Shamil / Kovalenko, Zahar / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Antila, Anne / Franklin, Oskar / Martinez-Moneo, Emma / Robinson, Stuart M / Panzuto, Francesco / Regenet, Nicolas / Muffatti, Francesca / Partelli, Stefano / Wiese, Dominik / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Dousset, Bertrand / Edwin, Bjørn / Bartsch, Detlef K / Sauvanet, Alain / Falconi, Massimo / Ceyhan, Güralp O / Gaujoux, Sebastien / Anonymous100922. ·Department of Abdominal Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Transplantation and Liver Surgery, Helsinki University Hospital, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: ville.salinen@helsinki.fi. · Department of Surgery, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Klinikum Rechts der Isar, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · General Surgery Department, Saint Luke's Clinical Hospital, Saint Petersburg, Russia. · Federal Medical and Rehabilitation Center, Department of Surgical Oncology, Moscow, Russia. · The Intervention Center, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway. · Department of Gastroenterology and Alimentary Tract Surgery, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Umea University, Umea, Sweden. · Gastroenterology Department, Hospital Universitario Cruces, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain. · Department of HPB Surgery, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, Sant'Andrea Hospital - Sapienza University of Rome, Italy. · Department of Digestive and Endocrine Surgery, Institut des Maladies Digestives (IMAD), Nantes 44093, France. · Chirurgia Del Pancreas, Chirurgia Del Pancreas, Pancreas Translational & Clinical Research Center, Università Vita e Salute, Ospedale San Raffaele IRCC, Milano, Italy. · Department of Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Pôle des Maladies de L'Appareil Digestif (PMAD), DHU Unity, Clichy 92110, France; Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France. · Department of Digestive, Pancreatic and Endocrine Surgery, Cochin Hospital, APHP, Paris, France; Faculté de Médecine Paris Descartes, Université Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · The Intervention Center, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France; AP-HP, Hôpital Beaujon, Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Pôle des Maladies de L'Appareil Digestif (PMAD), DHU Unity, University Paris VII, AP-HP, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy 92110, France. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #28988702.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Malignant potential of small (≤20 mm) nonfunctional pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (sNF-PNET) is difficult to predict and management remain controversial. The aim of this study was to assess the prognosis of sporadic nonmetastatic sNF-PNETs. METHODS: Patients were identified from databases of 16 centers. Outcomes and risk factors for recurrence were identified by uni- and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: sNF-PNET was resected in 210 patients, and 66% (n = 138) were asymptomatic. Median age was 60 years, median tumor size was 15 mm, parenchyma-sparing surgery was performed in 42%. Postoperative mortality was 0.5% (n = 1), severe morbidity rate was 14.3% (n = 30), and 14 of 132 patients (10.6%) with harvested lymph nodes had metastatic lymph nodes. Tumor size, presence of biliary or pancreatic duct dilatation, and WHO grade 2-3 were independently associated with recurrence. Patients with tumors sized ≤10 mm were disease free at last follow-up. The 1-, 3- and 5-year disease-free survival rates for patients with tumors sized 11-20 mm on preoperative imaging were 95.1%, 91.0%, and 87.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In sNF-PNETs, the presence of biliary or pancreatic duct dilatation or WHO grade 2-3 advocate for surgical treatment. In the remaining patients, a wait-and-see policy might be considered.

7 Article Can standardized pathology examination increase the lymph node yield following laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for ductal adenocarcinoma? 2018

Sahakyan, Mushegh A / Haugvik, Sven P / Røsok, Bård I / Kazaryan, Airazat M / Ignjatovic, Dejan / Buanes, Trond / Labori, Knut J / Verbeke, Caroline S / Edwin, Bjørn. ·The Intervention Centre, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway; Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · The Intervention Centre, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Pathology, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · The Intervention Centre, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway; Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #28943397.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Lymph node yield (LNY) is an indicator of oncological adequacy of surgery in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Our hypothesis is that standardized pathology examination (SPE) aimed at accurate staging can increase the LNY without changing surgical technique. METHODS: After the introduction of SPE for distal pancreatosplenectomy specimens at Oslo University Hospital, prospective data were collected on patients with PDAC undergoing laparoscopic distal pancreatosplenectomy (LDP). Their data were compared with retrospective data from specimens examined in a non-standardized way (NSPE). RESULTS: SPE and NSPE were applied to 20 and 33 specimens, respectively. SPE was associated with a higher LNY and a higher median number of positive lymph nodes (PLN) in the specimen (18 vs 7, P = 0.001 and 4 vs 1, P = 0.005, respectively). In the stepwise regression model, SPE and younger age resulted in an increased LNY. In the logistic regression model, increased LNY and larger tumor size positively correlated with the presence of PLN. CONCLUSION: SPE of distal pancreatosplenectomy specimens is associated with higher LNY in patients with PDAC, which increases the likelihood of detecting PLN and reduces the risk of understaging. These findings also indicate that the LDP technique provides an adequate LNY in patients with PDAC.

8 Article Risk and protective factors for the occurrence of sporadic pancreatic endocrine neoplasms. 2017

Valente, Roberto / Hayes, Alastair J / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hedenström, Per / Siuka, Darko / Korsæth, Emilie / Kämmerer, Daniel / Robinson, Stuart M / Maisonneuve, Patrick / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Lindkvist, Bjorn / Capurso, Gabriele. ·Digestive and Liver Disease UnitSant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Department of General SurgeryRoyal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary SurgeryOslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Unit of GastroenterologyDepartment of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. · Department of GastroenterologyUniversity Medical Centre Ljubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia. · Department of General and Visceral SurgeryZentralklinik Bad Berka, Bad Berka, Germany. · Department of Hepatopancreatobiliary and Transplantation SurgeryThe Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Division of Epidemiology and BiostatisticsEuropean Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease UnitSant' Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy gabriele.capurso@gmail.com. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #28566532.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) represent 10% of all pancreatic tumors by prevalence. Their incidence has reportedly increased over recent decades in parallel with that of pancreatic adenocarcinoma. PNENs are relatively rare, and of the few institutions that have published potential risk factors, findings have been heterogeneous. Our objective was to investigate the association between potential risk and protective factors for the occurrence of sporadic PNENs across a European population from several institutions. A multinational European case-control study was conducted to examine the association of selected environmental, family and medical exposure factors using a standardized questionnaire in face-to-face interviews. A ratio of 1:3 cases to controls were sex and age matched at each study site. Adjusted univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed for statistically significant factors. The following results were obtained: In 201 cases and 603 controls, non-recent onset diabetes (OR 2.09, CI 1.27-3.46) was associated with an increased occurrence of PNENs. The prevalence of non-recent onset diabetes was higher both in cases with metastatic disease (TNM stage III-IV) or advanced grade (G3) at the time of diagnosis. The use of metformin in combination with insulin was also associated with a more aggressive phenotype. Drinking coffee was more frequent in cases with localized disease at diagnosis. Our study concluded that non-recent onset diabetes was associated with an increased occurrence of PNENs and the combination of metformin and insulin was consistent with a more aggressive PNEN phenotype. In contrast to previous studies, smoking, alcohol and first-degree family history of cancer were not associated with PNEN occurrence.

9 Article Results after surgical treatment of liver metastases in patients with high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas. 2017

Galleberg, R B / Knigge, U / Tiensuu Janson, E / Vestermark, L W / Haugvik, S-P / Ladekarl, M / Langer, S W / Grønbæk, H / Österlund, P / Hjortland, G O / Assmus, J / Tang, L / Perren, A / Sorbye, H. ·Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: renate.berget.galleberg@helse-bergen.no. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: rxs484@ku.dk. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. Electronic address: eva.tiensuu_janson@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: lene.vestermark@syd.dk. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: mortlade@rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: swlanger@dadlnet.dk. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: henning.gronbaek@aarhus.rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: pia.osterlund@pshp.fi. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: goo@ous-hf.no. · Center for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: jorg.assmus@helse-bergen.no. · Department of Pathology, MSKCC, New York, USA. Electronic address: tangl@MSKCC.ORG. · Department of Pathology, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: aurel.perren@pathology.unibe.ch. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Halfdan.sorbye@helse-bergen.no. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28522174.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NEC) are generally characterized by synchronous metastases, high aggressiveness and a dismal prognosis. Current international guidelines do not recommend surgical treatment of liver metastases, however the existing data are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of curatively intended resection/radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases in patients with metastatic GEP-NEC. METHODS: 32 patients with a diagnosis of high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (Ki-67 > 20%) and with intended curative resection/RFA of liver metastases, were identified among 840 patients from two Nordic GEP-NEC registries. Tumor morphology (well vs poor differentiation) was reassessed. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analyses for the entire cohort and for subgroups. RESULTS: Median OS after resection/RFA of liver metastases was 35.9 months (95%-CI: 20.6-51.3) with a five-year OS of 43%. The median PFS was 8.4 months (95%-CI: 3.9-13). Four patients (13%) were disease-free after 5 years. Two patients had well-differentiated morphology (NET G3) and 20 patients (63%) had Ki-67 ≥ 55%. A Ki-67 < 55% and receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were statistically significant factors of improved OS after liver resection/RFA. CONCLUSION: This study shows a long median and long term survival after liver surgery/RFA for these selected metastatic GEP-NEC patients, particularly for the group with a Ki-67 in the relatively lower G3 range. Our findings indicate a possible role for surgical treatment of liver metastases in the management of this patient population.

10 Article Role of laparoscopic enucleation in the treatment of pancreatic lesions: case series and case-matched analysis. 2017

Sahakyan, Mushegh A / Røsok, Bård Ingvald / Kazaryan, Airazat M / Barkhatov, Leonid / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Fretland, Åsmund Avdem / Ignjatovic, Dejan / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Edwin, Bjørn. ·The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital - Rikshospitalet, 0027, Oslo, Norway. sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · Department of Surgery No 1, Yerevan State Medical University After M. Heratsi, Yerevan, Armenia. sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · Department of HPB Sugery, Oslo University Hospital - Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. · The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital - Rikshospitalet, 0027, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Surgery, Drammen Hospital, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #27620912.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Previous studies report successful application of laparoscopic pancreatic enucleation (LPE). However, the evidence is limited to small series. This study aimed to evaluate the indications, technique and outcome of LPE at a tertiary care institution. METHODS: Between February 1998 and April 2016, 45 consecutive LPEs were performed at Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet. Twenty-four (53.3 %) patients subjected to right-sided LPE (RLPE) were compared with 21 (46.7 %) patients who had undergone left-sided LPE (LLPE). A case-matched analysis (1:2) was performed to compare the outcomes following LLPE and laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP). RESULTS: Patient demographics, BMI, ASA score and pathological characteristics were similar between the RLPE and LLPE groups. Operative time was slightly longer for RLPE [123 (53-320) vs 102 (50-373) min, P = 0.09]. The rates of severe morbidity (≥Accordion grade III) and clinically relevant pancreatic fistula (grades B/C) were comparable, although with a trend for higher rate of complications following LLPE (16.7 vs 33.3 %; P = 0.19 and 20.8 vs 33.3 %, P = 0.34, respectively). The hospital stay was similar between RLPE and LLPE [5 (2-80) vs 7 (2-52), P = 0.49]. A case-matched analysis demonstrated shorter operating time [145 (90-350) vs 103 (50-233) min, P = 0.02], but higher readmission rate following LLPE (25 vs 3.1 %, P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: LLPE seems to be associated with a higher risk of postoperative morbidity and readmission rates than LDP. RLPE is a feasible, safe approach and a reasonable alternative to pancreatoduodenectomy in selected patients with pancreatic lesions.

11 Article Upregulation of INS-IGF2 read-through expression and identification of a novel INS-IGF2 splice variant in insulinomas. 2016

Johannessen, Lene E / Panagopoulos, Ioannis / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Heim, Sverre / Micci, Francesca. ·Section for Cancer Cytogenetics, Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0310 Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, 0372 Oslo, Norway. ·Oncol Rep · Pubmed #27667266.

ABSTRACT: Fusion transcripts arising from the combination of exons residing on neighboring genes on the same chromosome may give rise to chimeric or novel proteins. Such read-through transcripts have been detected in different cancers where they may be of pathogenetic interest. In this study, we describe for the first time the expression of a read-through transcript in insulinomas, a functioning neuroendocrine pancreatic neoplasm. The read-through transcript INS-IGF2, composed of exons from the two genes proinsulin precursor (INS) and insulin‑like growth factor 2 (IGF2), both mapping to chromosomal subband 11p15.5, was highly expressed in the two insulinomas analyzed. More precisely, version 2 of the INS-IGF2 transcript was expressed, indicating possible expression of the chimeric INS-IGF2 protein. We further identified a novel splice variant of the INS-IGF2 read-through transcript in one of the insulinomas, composed of exon 1 of INS3 and exons of IGF2. In the same tumor, we found high expression of INS3 and the presence of the A allele at SNP rs689. SNP rs689 has been previously described to regulate splicing of the INS transcript, indicating that this regulatory mechanism also affects splicing of INS-IGF2. The identification of the INS-IGF2 read-through transcript specifically in tumor tissue but not in normal pancreatic tissue suggests that high expression of INS-IGF2 could be neoplasia‑specific. These results may have potential clinical applications given that the read-through transcript could be used as a biomarker in insulinoma patients.

12 Article Transcriptomic Profiling of Tumor Aggressiveness in Sporadic Nonfunctioning Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms. 2016

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Vodák, Daniel / Haugom, Lisbeth / Hovig, Eivind / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Heim, Sverre / Micci, Francesca. ·From the *Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital; †Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo; ‡Department of Tumor Biology, Institute for Cancer Research, and §Section for Cancer Cytogenetics, Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics, Oslo University Hospital; and ∥Centre for Cancer Biomedicine and ¶Department of Informatics, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26918873.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to compare RNA sequencing data of sporadic nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) to identify gene expression patterns that may be important for molecular differentiation of tumor aggressiveness. METHODS: RNA sequencing was performed on samples of sporadic nonfunctioning PNENs, grouped as tumors with mild behavior (nonmetastatic and Ki67 < 5%) or aggressive behavior (metastatic and Ki67 ≥ 5%), on an Illumina Genome Analyzer II platform. Bioinformatic analyses were performed on the resulting data. RESULTS: Of 22,810 identified transcripts from protein-coding genes, a set of 309 genes were significantly differentially expressed between the 2 groups, of which 166 were upregulated and 143 downregulated in the aggressive disease group. Among the top protein-coding upregulated genes, we found genes encoding proteins involved in DNA packaging, ability to taste, chromosome structuring, cytoskeleton structuring, and cell-cell signaling. Among the top protein-coding downregulated genes, we found genes encoding proteins involved in neuronal differentiation, cytoskeleton structuring, cell-cell signaling, and immunological processes. CONCLUSIONS: A higher degree of tumor aggressiveness in sporadic nonfunctioning PNENs seems to be associated with upregulation of genes involved in regulation of the cell cycle and cell division. Small sample size and lack of a replication set are limitations of this study.

13 Article Surgical Treatment as a Principle for Patients with High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Nordic Multicenter Comparative Study. 2016

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Österlund, Pia / Langer, Seppo W / Falk, Ragnhild Sørum / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Grønbæk, Henning / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Sorbye, Halfdan. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26678407.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the role of surgery for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (hgPNEC) in a large Nordic multicenter cohort study. Prior studies evaluating the role of surgery for patients with hgPNEC are limited, and the benefit of the surgery is uncertain. METHODS: Data from patients with a diagnosis of hgPNEC determined between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively registered at 10 Nordic university hospitals. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the overall survival of different treatment groups, and Cox-regression analysis was used to evaluate factors potentially influencing survival. RESULTS: The study registered 119 patients. The median survival period from the time of metastasis was 23 months for patients undergoing initial resection of localized nonmetastatic disease and chemotherapy at the time of recurrence (n = 14), 29 months for patients undergoing resection of the primary tumor and resection/radiofrequency ablation of synchronous metastatic liver disease (n = 12), and 13 months for patients with synchronous metastatic disease given systemic chemotherapy alone (n = 78). The 3-year survival rate after surgery of the primary tumor and metastatic disease was 69 %. Resection of the primary tumor was an independent factor for improved survival after occurrence of metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with resected localized nonmetastatic hgPNEC and later metastatic disease seemed to benefit from initial resection of the primary tumor. Patients selected for resection of the primary tumor and synchronous liver metastases had a high 3-year survival rate. Selected patients with both localized hgPNEC and metastatic hgPNEC should be considered for radical surgical treatment.

14 Article Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma: results of a multicenter cohort study on 196 patients. 2016

Sahakyan, Mushegh A / Kazaryan, Airazat M / Rawashdeh, Majd / Fuks, David / Shmavonyan, Mark / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Buanes, Trond / Røsok, Bård Ingvald / Ignjatovic, Dejan / Abu Hilal, Mohammad / Gayet, Brice / Kim, Song Cheol / Edwin, Bjørn. ·The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital - Rikshospitalet, 0027, Oslo, Norway. sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · Department of Surgery No 1, Yerevan State Medical University After M. Heratsi, Yerevan, Armenia. sahakyan.mushegh@gmail.com. · The Intervention Centre, Oslo University Hospital - Rikshospitalet, 0027, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Surgery, Finnmark Hospital, Kirkenes, Norway. · University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Digestive Diseases, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Université Paris Descartes, Paris, France. · Institut des Systèmes Intelligents et Robotique (ISIR), Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, Medical Faculty, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Billiary Sugery, Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Surgery, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Drammen, Norway. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Akershus University Hospital, University of Oslo, Lørenskog, Norway. · Division of Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #26514135.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Laparoscopy is widely accepted as a feasible option for distal pancreatectomy. However, the experience in laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy (LDP) for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is limited to a small number of studies, reported by expert centers. The present study aimed to evaluate perioperative and oncological outcomes after LDP for PDAC in a large, multicenter cohort of patients. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of the data on 196 patients with histologically verified PDAC, operated at Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet (Oslo, Norway), Asan Medical Center (Seoul, Republic of Korea), Institut Mutualiste Montsouris (Paris, France) and University Hospital Southampton (Southampton, UK) between January 2002 and April 2015 was conducted. The patients with standard (SLDP) and extended (i.e., en bloc with adjacent organ, ELDP) resections were compared in terms of perioperative and oncological outcomes. RESULTS: Out of 196 LDP procedures, 191 (97.4 %) were completed through laparoscopy, while five (2.6 %) were converted to open surgery. ELDP was performed in 30 (15.7 %) cases. Sixty-one (31.9 %) patients experienced postoperative complications, including 48 (25.1 %) with pancreatic fistula. The rate of clinically relevant fistula (grade B/C) was 15.7 %. Median postoperative hospital stay was 8 (2-63) days. Median follow-up was 16 months. Median survival was 31.3 months (95 % CI 22.9-39.6). Three- and 5-year actuarial survival rates were 42.4 and 30 %, respectively. SLDP was associated with significantly higher survival compared with ELDP (p = 0.032). CONCLUSIONS: LDP seems to be a feasible and safe procedure, providing satisfactory oncological outcomes in patients with PDAC.

15 Article Loss of 11p11 is a frequent and early event in sporadic nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Gorunova, Ludmila / Haugom, Lisbeth / Eibak, Anne Mette / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Heim, Sverre / Micci, Francesca. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, 0372 Oslo, Norway. · Section for Cancer Cytogenetics, Institute for Cancer Genetics and Informatics, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University Hospital, 0372 Oslo, Norway. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, 0372 Oslo, Norway. ·Oncol Rep · Pubmed #25018013.

ABSTRACT: The pathogenesis of sporadic pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (PNENs) is poorly understood. To gain insight into the genetic mechanisms underlying this tumor entity, we performed genome-wide screening of 16 surgical specimens from 15 patients with sporadic PNEN, combining G-band karyotyping and high resolution comparative genomic hybridization (HR-CGH). G-banding revealed abnormal karyotypes in 2 of 10 tumor samples analyzed. DNA copy number changes were detected in 13 samples, whereas three tumors showed a balanced genome. Gains were more frequent than losses in the nonfunctioning tumors (n=13). Common gains were scored at 5p12-13, 4q13-24, 5p15, 5q11-31, and 9q21-22. Common losses were scored at 11p11, 11p14-15, 11q23, 11p12-13, and 11q22. The average number of copy aberrations (ANCA index) was 12 for 13 nonfunctioning primary tumors, 4.8 for the nonfunctioning tumors with low Ki-67 (≥5%), 21.2 for the tumors with high Ki-67 (<5%), 2.5 for small tumors (<3.5 cm), and 17.8 for large tumors (≥3.5 cm). There was a statistically significant difference in the ANCA index between the groups defined by Ki-67 and tumor size. Nonfunctioning tumors with low Ki-67, no distant metastasis and small size had few aberrations detected by HR-CGH, but frequent loss of material from chromosomal band 11p11. The present study indicates the existence of distinct cytogenetic patterns in sporadic nonfunctioning PNEN. Loss of chromosomal band 11p11 might indicate a primary pathogenetic event in these tumors.

16 Article Long-term outcome of laparoscopic surgery for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2013

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Marangos, Irina Pavlik / Røsok, Bård Ingvald / Pomianowska, Ewa / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Mathisen, Oystein / Edwin, Bjørn. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0372, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no ·World J Surg · Pubmed #23263686.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: As most pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET) are relatively small and solitary, they may be considered well suited for removal by a minimally invasive approach. There are few large series that describe laparoscopic surgery for PNET. The primary aim of this study was to describe the feasibility, outcome, and histopathology associated with laparoscopic pancreatic surgery (LS) of PNET in a large series. METHODS: All patients with PNET who underwent LS at a single hospital from March 1997 to April 2011 were included retrospectively in the study. RESULTS: A total of 72 patients with PNET underwent 75 laparoscopic procedures, out of which 65 were laparoscopic resections or enucleations. The median operative time of all patients who underwent resections or enucleations was 175 (60-520) min, the median blood loss was 300 (5-2700) ml, and the median length of hospital stay was 7 (2-27) days. The overall morbidity rate was 42%, with a surgical morbidity rate of 21% and postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) formation in 21%. Laparoscopic enucleations were associated with a higher rate of POPF than were laparoscopic resections. Five-year disease-specific survival rate was 90%. The T stage, R stage, and a Ki-67 cutoff value of 5% significantly predicted 5-year survival. CONCLUSION: LS of PNET is feasible with acceptable morbidity and a good overall disease-specific long-term prognosis.

17 Article Concomitant Nonfunctional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor and Gastric GIST in a Patient Without Neurofibromatosis Type 1. 2012

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Røsok, Bård Ingvald / Edwin, Bjørn / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Mathisen, Øystein. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0027, Oslo, Norway. svhaug@ous-hf.no. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0027, Oslo, Norway. brosok@ous-hf.no. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0027, Oslo, Norway. bjorn.edwin@ous-hf.no. · Interventional Centre, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway. bjorn.edwin@ous-hf.no. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0027, Oslo, Norway. igladhau@ous-hf.no. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. igladhau@ous-hf.no. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Sognsvannsveien 20, 0027, Oslo, Norway. omathise@ous-hf.no. ·J Gastrointest Cancer · Pubmed #22083533.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

18 Article Molecular imaging with ⁶⁸Ga-SSTR PET/CT and correlation to immunohistochemistry of somatostatin receptors in neuroendocrine tumours. 2011

Kaemmerer, Daniel / Peter, Luisa / Lupp, Amelie / Schulz, Stefan / Sänger, Jörg / Prasad, Vikas / Kulkarni, Harshad / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Hommann, Merten / Baum, Richard Paul. ·Department of General and Visceral Surgery, Zentralklinik Bad Berka GmbH, Robert-Koch-Allee 9, 99437 Bad Berka, Germany. Daniel.Kaemmerer@zentralklinik.de ·Eur J Nucl Med Mol Imaging · Pubmed #21626438.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Somatostatin receptors (SSTR) are known for an overexpression in gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NET). The aim of the present study was to find out if the receptor density predicted by the semi-quantitative parameters generated from the static positron emission tomography (PET/CT) correlated with the in vitro immunohistochemistry using a novel rabbit monoclonal anti-SSTR2A antibody (clone UMB-1) for specific SSTR2A immunohistochemistry and polyclonal antibodies for SSTR1 and 3-5. METHODS: Overall 14 surgical specimens generated from 34 histologically documented GEP-NET patients were correlated with the preoperative (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT. Quantitative assessment of the receptor density was done using the immunoreactive score (IRS) of Remmele and Stegner; the additional 4-point IRS classification for immunohistochemistry and standardized uptake values (SUV(max) and SUV(mean)) were used for PET/CT. RESULTS: The IRS for SSTR2A and SSTR5 correlated highly significant with the SUV(max) on the PET/CT (p < 0.001; p < 0.05) and the IRS for SSTR2A with the SUV(mean) (p < 0.013). The level of SSTR2A score correlated significantly with chromogranin A staining and indirectly to the tumour grading. CONCLUSION: The highly significant correlation between SSTR2A and SSTR5 and the SUV(max) on the (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT scans is concordant with the affinity profile of (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC to the SSTR subtypes and demonstrates the excellent qualification of somatostatin analogues in the diagnostics of NET. This study correlating somatostatin receptor imaging using (68)Ga-DOTA-NOC PET/CT with immunohistochemically analysed SSTR also underlines the approval of therapy using somatostatin analogues, follow-up imaging as well as radionuclide therapy.

19 Minor Letter to the editor: Multidisciplinary management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors--the importance of an aggressive surgical approach. 2016

Labori, Knut Jørgen / Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Line, Pål-Dag. ·a Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway . · b Department of Transplantation Medicine , Oslo University Hospital , Oslo , Norway. ·Scand J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #26458136.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

20 Minor Laparoscopic versus open pancreas resection for neuroendocrine tumours: need for evaluation of oncological outcomes. 2014

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Gaujoux, Sébastien / Røsok, Bård / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Dousset, Bertrand / Edwin, Bjørn. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Paris, France; Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Paris, France. ·HPB (Oxford) · Pubmed #25099232.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

21 Minor Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy: trends in surgical technique. 2012

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Edwin, Bjørn. · ·J Am Coll Surg · Pubmed #23164147.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --