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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Pascal Hammel
Based on 82 articles published since 2009
(Why 82 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, P. Hammel wrote the following 82 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
Pages: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4
1 Guideline Guidelines for time-to-event end-point definitions in trials for pancreatic cancer. Results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End-points in CANcer trials). 2014

Bonnetain, Franck / Bonsing, Bert / Conroy, Thierry / Dousseau, Adelaide / Glimelius, Bengt / Haustermans, Karin / Lacaine, François / Van Laethem, Jean Luc / Aparicio, Thomas / Aust, Daniela / Bassi, Claudio / Berger, Virginie / Chamorey, Emmanuel / Chibaudel, Benoist / Dahan, Laeticia / De Gramont, Aimery / Delpero, Jean Robert / Dervenis, Christos / Ducreux, Michel / Gal, Jocelyn / Gerber, Erich / Ghaneh, Paula / Hammel, Pascal / Hendlisz, Alain / Jooste, Valérie / Labianca, Roberto / Latouche, Aurelien / Lutz, Manfred / Macarulla, Teresa / Malka, David / Mauer, Muriel / Mitry, Emmanuel / Neoptolemos, John / Pessaux, Patrick / Sauvanet, Alain / Tabernero, Josep / Taieb, Julien / van Tienhoven, Geertjan / Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie / Bellera, Carine / Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone / Collette, Laurence. ·Methodology and Quality of Life Unit in Cancer, EA 3181, University Hospital of Besançon and CTD-INCa Gercor, UNICNCER GERICO, Besançon, France. Electronic address: franck.bonnetain@univ-fcomte.fr. · Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy, France. · Bordeaux Segalen University & CHRU, Bordeaux, France. · Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven, Belgium. · Digestive Surgical Department, Tenon hospital, Paris, France. · Gastro Intestinal Cancer Unit Erasme Hospital Brussels, Belgium. · Gastroenterology Department, Avicenne Hospital, Paris 13, Bobigny, France. · Institute for Pathology, University Hospital Carl-Gustav-Carus, Dresden, Germany. · Surgical and Gastroenterological Department, Endocrine and Pancreatic Unit, Hospital of 'G.B.Rossi', University of Verona, Italy. · Institut de Cancérologie de l'Ouest - Centre Paul Papin Centre de Lutte Contre le Cancer (CLCC), Angers, France. · Biostatistics Unit, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice, France. · Oncology Department, Hôpital Saint-Antoine & CTD-INCa GERCOR, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, UPMC Paris VI, Paris, France. · Gastroenterology Department, Hopital la Timone, Assitance publique des Hopitaux de Marseille, Marseille, France. · Department of Surgery, Institut Paoli Calmettes, Marseille, France. · Department of Surgery, Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Gastroenterology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Biostatistician, Biostatistics Unit, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice, France. · Department of Radiotherapy, Institut fuer Radioonkologie, Vienna, Austria. · Department of Surgical Oncology, Royal Liverpool Hospital, United Kingdom. · Department of Gastroenterology, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Digestive Oncology and Gastro-enterology Department, Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, Belgium. · Digestive Cancer Registry, INSERM U866, Dijon, France. · Medical Oncology Unit, Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo, Bergame, Italy. · Inserm, Centre for Research in Epidemiology and Population Health, U1018, Biostatistics Team, Villejuif, France. · Gastroenterology Department, Caritas Hospital, Saarbrücken, Germany. · Department of the Gastrointestinal Tumors and Phase I Unit, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Statistics Department, EORTC, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institut Curie, Hôpital René Huguenin, Saint-Cloud, France. · Division of Surgery and Oncology at the University of Liverpool and Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, United Kingdom. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Universitu Hospital Strasbourg, France. · Department of Hepato-pancreatic and Biliary Surgery, Beaujon Hospital, Assistance Publique des Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France. · Department of Hepato-gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Georges Pompidou European hospital, Paris, France. · Department of Radiation Oncology, Academisch Medisch Centrum, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Institut Du Cancer de Montpellier, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, and Data Center for Cancer Clinical Trials, CTD-INCa, Montpellier, France. · Clinical and Epidemiological Research Unit, Institut Bergonie, Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Bordeaux, France; Data Center for Cancer Clinical Trials, CTD-INCa, Bordeaux, France; INSERM, Centre d'Investigation Clinique - Épidémiologie Clinique CIC-EC 7, F-33000 Bordeaux, France. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #25256896.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Using potential surrogate end-points for overall survival (OS) such as Disease-Free- (DFS) or Progression-Free Survival (PFS) is increasingly common in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, end-points are too often imprecisely defined which largely contributes to a lack of homogeneity across trials, hampering comparison between them. The aim of the DATECAN (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End-points in CANcer trials)-Pancreas project is to provide guidelines for standardised definition of time-to-event end-points in RCTs for pancreatic cancer. METHODS: Time-to-event end-points currently used were identified from a literature review of pancreatic RCT trials (2006-2009). Academic research groups were contacted for participation in order to select clinicians and methodologists to participate in the pilot and scoring groups (>30 experts). A consensus was built after 2 rounds of the modified Delphi formal consensus approach with the Rand scoring methodology (range: 1-9). RESULTS: For pancreatic cancer, 14 time to event end-points and 25 distinct event types applied to two settings (detectable disease and/or no detectable disease) were considered relevant and included in the questionnaire sent to 52 selected experts. Thirty experts answered both scoring rounds. A total of 204 events distributed over the 14 end-points were scored. After the first round, consensus was reached for 25 items; after the second consensus was reached for 156 items; and after the face-to-face meeting for 203 items. CONCLUSION: The formal consensus approach reached the elaboration of guidelines for standardised definitions of time-to-event end-points allowing cross-comparison of RCTs in pancreatic cancer.

2 Guideline New strategies and designs in pancreatic cancer research: consensus guidelines report from a European expert panel. 2012

Van Laethem, J-L / Verslype, C / Iovanna, J L / Michl, P / Conroy, T / Louvet, C / Hammel, P / Mitry, E / Ducreux, M / Maraculla, T / Uhl, W / Van Tienhoven, G / Bachet, J B / Maréchal, R / Hendlisz, A / Bali, M / Demetter, P / Ulrich, F / Aust, D / Luttges, J / Peeters, M / Mauer, M / Roth, A / Neoptolemos, J P / Lutz, M / Anonymous6430701. ·Gastrointestinal Cancer Unit, Hôpital Erasme, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels, Belgium. jl.vanlaethem@erasme.ulb.ac.be ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #21810728.

ABSTRACT: Although the treatment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains a huge challenge, it is entering a new era with the development of new strategies and trial designs. Because there is an increasing number of novel therapeutic agents and potential combinations available to test in patients with PDAC, the identification of robust prognostic and predictive markers and of new targets and relevant pathways is a top priority as well as the design of adequate trials incorporating molecular-driven hypothesis. We presently report a consensus strategy for research in pancreatic cancer that was developed by a multidisciplinary panel of experts from different European institutions and collaborative groups involved in pancreatic cancer. The expert panel embraces the concept of exploratory early proof of concept studies, based on the prediction of response to novel agents and combinations, and randomised phase II studies permitting the selection of the best therapeutic approach to go forward into phase III, where the recommended primary end point remains overall survival. Trials should contain as many translational components as possible, relying on standardised tissue and blood processing and robust biobanking, and including dynamic imaging. Attention should not only be paid to the pancreatic cancer cells but also to microenvironmental factors and stem/stellate cells.

3 Review Optimizing the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer with a focus on induction chemotherapy: Expert opinion based on a review of current evidence. 2019

Seufferlein, Thomas / Hammel, Pascal / Delpero, Jean Robert / Macarulla, Teresa / Pfeiffer, Per / Prager, Gerald W / Reni, Michele / Falconi, Massimo / Philip, Philip A / Van Cutsem, Eric. ·University Medical Center Ulm, Ulm, Germany. Electronic address: thomas.seufferlein@uniklinik-ulm.de. · Hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP), Clichy, and Université Paris VII-Denis Diderot, France. Electronic address: pascal.hammel@aphp.fr. · Aix Marseille Université, Marseille, France. Electronic address: delperojr@ipc.unicancer.fr. · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. Electronic address: tmacarulla@vhio.net. · Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. Electronic address: per.pfeiffer@rsyd.dk. · Department of Medicine I, Comprehensive Cancer Center Vienna, Medical University Vienna, Austria. Electronic address: gerald.prager@meduniwien.ac.at. · Department of Medical Oncology, IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: reni.michele@hsr.it. · Pancreas Translational and Clinical Research Centre, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, "Vita-Salute" University, Milan, Italy. Electronic address: falconi.massimo@hsr.it. · Department of Oncology, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI, USA. Electronic address: philipp@karmanos.org. · Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: eric.vancutsem@uzleuven.be. ·Cancer Treat Rev · Pubmed #31163334.

ABSTRACT: Surgical resection of pancreatic cancer offers a chance of cure, but currently only 15-20% of patients are diagnosed with resectable disease, while 30-40% are diagnosed with non-metastatic, unresectable locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC). Treatment for LAPC usually involves systemic chemotherapy, with the aim of controlling disease progression, reducing symptoms and maintaining quality of life. In a small proportion of patients with LAPC, primary chemotherapy may successfully convert unresectable tumours to resectable tumours. In this setting, primary chemotherapy is termed 'induction therapy' rather than 'neoadjuvant'. There is currently a lack of data from randomized studies to thoroughly evaluate the benefits of induction chemotherapy in LAPC, but Phase II and retrospective data have shown improved survival and high R0 resection rates. New chemotherapy regimens such as nab-paclitaxel + gemcitabine and FOLFIRINOX have demonstrated improvement in overall survival for metastatic disease and shown promise as neoadjuvant treatment in patients with resectable and borderline resectable disease. Prospective trials are underway to evaluate these regimens further as induction therapy in LAPC and preliminary data indicate a beneficial effect of FOLFIRINOX in this setting. Further research into optimal induction schedules is needed, as well as guidance on the patients who are most suitable for induction therapy. In this expert opinion article, a panel of surgeons, medical oncologists and gastrointestinal oncologists review the available evidence on management strategies for LAPC and provide their recommendations for patient care, with a particular focus on the use of induction chemotherapy.

4 Review Pancreatic cancer: French clinical practice guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up (SNFGE, FFCD, GERCOR, UNICANCER, SFCD, SFED, SFRO, ACHBT, AFC). 2018

Neuzillet, Cindy / Gaujoux, Sébastien / Williet, Nicolas / Bachet, Jean-Baptiste / Bauguion, Lucile / Colson Durand, Laurianne / Conroy, Thierry / Dahan, Laetitia / Gilabert, Marine / Huguet, Florence / Marthey, Lysiane / Meilleroux, Julie / de Mestier, Louis / Napoléon, Bertrand / Portales, Fabienne / Sa Cunha, Antonio / Schwarz, Lilian / Taieb, Julien / Chibaudel, Benoist / Bouché, Olivier / Hammel, Pascal / Anonymous2561138 / Anonymous2571138 / Anonymous2581138 / Anonymous2591138 / Anonymous2601138 / Anonymous2611138 / Anonymous2621138 / Anonymous2631138 / Anonymous2641138 / Anonymous2651138. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Curie Institute, Versailles Saint-Quentin University (UVSQ), Saint-Cloud, France. Electronic address: cindy.neuzillet@gmail.com. · Department of Digestive, Hepato-Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Cochin Hospital, AP-HP, Paris Descartes Faculty of Medicine, Paris Descartes University, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France. · Hepato-Gastroenterology Department, University Hospital of Saint-Etienne, Saint Priest en Jarez, France. · Hepato-Gastroenterology Department, Pitié Salpétrière University Hospital, AP-HP, Paris Cedex 13, France. · Hepato-Gastroenterology Department, Departmental Hospital Center, La Roche sur Yon, France. · Department of Radiotherapy, Henri Mondor Hospital, AP-HP, Université Paris Est Creteil, Créteil, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Lorraine Institute of Oncology and Lorraine University, Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cedex, France. · Digestive Oncology Department, "DACCORD" (Digestif, Anatomie pathologique, Chirurgie, CISIH, Oncologie, Radiothérapie, Dermatologie) pole, CHU Timone, Marseille Cedex 05, France. · Paoli Calmettes Institute, Department of Medical Oncology and Cancer Research Center of Marseille (CRCM), INSERM U1068 Stress Cell, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France. · Department of Oncology and Radiotherapy, Tenon Hospital, East Paris University Hospitals, AP-HP, Paris Sorbonne University, Paris, France. · Gastroenterology Department, Béclère Hospital, AP-HP, Clamart, France. · Pathology Department, Toulouse University Hospital, Toulouse, France. · Department of Gastroenterology-Pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, APHP, Paris 7 University, Clichy, France. · Jean Mermoz Private Hospital, Ramsay Générale de Santé, Lyon, France. · Digestive Oncology Department, Regional Institute of Cancer, Montpellier, France. · INSERM UMR 935, Paul Brousse Hospital, Hepatobiliary Center, AP-HP, Université Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif, France. · Department of Digestive Surgery, Hôpital Charles Nicolle, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen, France and Genomic and Personalized Medicine in Cancer and Neurological Disorders, UMR 1245 INSERM, Rouen University, France. · Hepato-Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology Department, Georges Pompidou European Hospital, AP-HP, Paris, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Franco-British Institute, Levallois-Perret, France. · Hepato-Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology Department, Robert Debré University Hospital, Avenue Général Koenig, 51092 Reims Cedex, France. · Department of Digestive Oncology, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP), Paris VII Diderot University, Clichy-la-Garenne, France. Electronic address: pascal.hammel@aphp.fr. ·Dig Liver Dis · Pubmed #30219670.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This document is a summary of the French intergroup guidelines regarding the management of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PA), updated in July 2018. DESIGN: This collaborative work was produced under the auspices of all French medical and surgical societies involved in the management of PA. It is based on the previous guidelines, recent literature review and expert opinions. Recommendations were graded in three categories, according to the level of evidence. RESULTS: Over the last seven years, significant changes in PA management have been implemented in clinical practice. Imaging/staging: diffusion magnetic resonance imaging is useful before surgery to rule out small liver metastases. SURGERY: centralization of pancreatic surgery in expert centers is associated with a decreased postoperative mortality. Adjuvant chemotherapy: modified FOLFIRINOX in fit patients, or gemcitabine, or 5-FU, or gemcitabine plus capecitabine, to be discussed on a case-by-case basis. Locally advanced PA: no survival benefit of chemoradiotherapy. Metastatic PA: FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combination are first-line standards in fit patients; second-line with 5FU/nal-IRI or 5FU/oxaliplatin combination after first-line gemcitabine. CONCLUSION: Guidelines for management of PA are continuously evolving and need to be regularly updated. This constant progress is made possible through clinical and translational research. However, as each individual case is particular, they cannot substitute to multidisciplinary tumor board discussion.

5 Review [Role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer]. 2018

Huguet, F / Rivin Del Campo, E / Antoni, D / Vendrely, V / Hammel, P. ·Service d'oncologie radiothérapie, hôpital Tenon, hôpitaux universitaires Est Parisien, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Université Paris Sorbonne, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. Electronic address: florence.huguet@aphp.fr. · Service d'oncologie radiothérapie, hôpital Tenon, hôpitaux universitaires Est Parisien, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France; Université Paris Sorbonne, 4, rue de la Chine, 75020 Paris, France. · Département universitaire de radiothérapie, centre Paul-Strauss, Unicancer, 3, rue de la Porte-de-l'Hôpital, 67065 Strasbourg cedex, France. · Service d'oncologie radiothérapie, hôpital Haut-Lévêque, CHU de Bordeaux, avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac, France. · Service d'oncologie digestive et médicale, hôpital Beaujon, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Géneral-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France; Université Paris Diderot, 100, boulevard du Géneral-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. ·Cancer Radiother · Pubmed #30100126.

ABSTRACT: At diagnosis, about 15% of patients with pancreatic cancer present with a resectable tumour, 50% have a metastatic tumour, and 25% a locally advanced tumor (non-metastatic but unresectable due to vascular invasion) or borderline resectable. Despite the technical progress made in the field of radiation therapy and the improvement of the efficacy of chemotherapy, the prognosis of these patients remains very poor. Recently, the role of radiation therapy in the management of pancreatic cancer has been much debated. This review aims to evaluate the role of radiation therapy for these patients.

6 Review Preoperative imaging and pathologic classification for pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2018

Deguelte, S / de Mestier, L / Hentic, O / Cros, J / Lebtahi, R / Hammel, P / Kianmanesh, R. ·Department of general, digestive and endocrine surgery, Robert-Debré hospital, CHU de Reims, Reims Champagne-Ardenne university, 8, rue du général Koenig, 51100 Reims, France. · Department of gastroenterology, Beaujon hospital, University Paris 7, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Department of pathology, Beaujon hospital, University Paris 7, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Department of nuclear medecine, Beaujon hospital, University Paris 7, AP-HP, 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Department of general, digestive and endocrine surgery, Robert-Debré hospital, CHU de Reims, Reims Champagne-Ardenne university, 8, rue du général Koenig, 51100 Reims, France. Electronic address: rkianmanesh@chu-reims.fr. ·J Visc Surg · Pubmed #29397338.

ABSTRACT: The management of patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumor (PNET), whether hormonally secretory or not, is multidisciplinary and often multimodal. Surgical treatment plays a central role because complete resection is the only potentially curative treatment. The choice of the therapeutic plan for a PNET requires precise localization of the primary tumor (which may sometimes be multiple in case of genetic predisposition), confirmation of the diagnosis of PNET, a search for metastases (mainly hepatic), and identification of the main histoprognostic factors. This update focuses on the WHO 2017 histological classification and recent innovations in the preoperative assessment of PNET using conventional and isotopic imaging. The aim is to not only allow the mapping of primary and metastatic lesions but also to predict tumor aggressiveness.

7 Review Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma in BRCA2 mutation carriers. 2016

de Mestier, Louis / Danset, Jean-Baptiste / Neuzillet, Cindy / Rebours, Vinciane / Cros, Jérôme / Soufir, Nadem / Hammel, Pascal. ·Department of Gastroenterology and PancreatologyBeaujon Hospital, Paris 7 University, APHP, Clichy, France. · Department of Hepato-GastroenterologyEuropean Georges-Pompidou Hospital, APHP, Paris, France. · Department of Digestive OncologyBeaujon Hospital, Paris 7 University, APHP, Clichy, France. · Department of PathologyBeaujon Hospital, Paris 7 University, APHP, Clichy, France. · Department of GeneticsBichat Hospital, Paris 7 University, APHP, Clichy, France. · Department of Digestive OncologyBeaujon Hospital, Paris 7 University, APHP, Clichy, France pascal.hammel@aphp.fr. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #27511924.

ABSTRACT: Germline BRCA2 mutations are the first known cause of inherited (familial) pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This tumor is the third most frequent cancer in carriers of germline BRCA2 mutations, as it occurs in around 10% of BRCA2 families. PDAC is known as one of the most highly lethal cancers, mainly because of its chemoresistance and frequently late diagnosis. Based on recent developments in molecular biology, a subgroup of BRCA2-associated PDAC has been created, allowing screening, early surgical treatment and personalized systemic treatment. BRCA2 germline mutation carriers who have ≥1 first-degree relative, or ≥2 blood relatives with PDAC, should undergo screening and regular follow-up based on magnetic resonance imaging and endoscopic ultrasound. The goal of screening is to detect early invasive PDAC and advanced precancerous lesions suitable for a stepwise surgical complete (R0) resection. Increasing evidence on the molecular role of the BRCA2 protein in the homologous recombination of DNA damages suggest that BRCA2-related PDAC are sensitive to agents causing DNA cross-linking damage, such as platinum salts, and treatments targeting rescue DNA repair pathways, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors that are currently under investigation.

8 Review Evaluation and management of pancreatic lesions in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease. 2016

Keutgen, Xavier M / Hammel, Pascal / Choyke, Peter L / Libutti, Steven K / Jonasch, Eric / Kebebew, Electron. ·Endocrine Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 4-5940, Bethesda, Maryland 20891-1201, USA. · Department of Digestive Oncology, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Molecular Imaging Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room B3B69F, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-1088, USA. · Department of Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, 111 East 210th Street, Bronx, New York 10467, USA. · Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461, USA. · Department of Genitourinary Medical Oncology, Division of Cancer Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1155 Pressler Street, Unit 1374, Houston, Texas 77030-3721, USA. ·Nat Rev Clin Oncol · Pubmed #27030075.

ABSTRACT: von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is a heritable cancer-predisposition syndrome with multiorgan involvement. Pancreatic lesions are detected in approximately two-thirds of patients with VHL disease at some point during their lifetime. In these patients, cystic pancreatic lesions are almost exclusively benign and, unless symptomatic, do not require surgical or endoscopic intervention; however, solid pancreatic lesions can often be recognized through imaging screens, and are commonly found to be nonfunctioning pancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (pNETs) with malignant potential. The natural history of these VHL-associated pNETs is variable, and lacks clinical or imaging features that predict disease progression or metastatic potential, and generally needs to be managed more conservatively than their sporadic counterparts. Treatment options for such lesions, which range from active surveillance to surgical intervention, can nevertheless be associated with considerable morbidity and even mortality. Of note, although several guidelines have been established for the management of tumours associated with VHL syndrome, none of these have specifically focused on pancreatic lesions. Thus, we aim to characterize the types of pancreatic lesions associated with VHL disease and their natural history, to identify particular lesions that necessitate treatment, and to define what forms of treatment should be undertaken.

9 Review State of the art and future directions of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma therapy. 2015

Neuzillet, Cindy / Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï / Bourget, Philippe / Cros, Jérôme / Couvelard, Anne / Sauvanet, Alain / Vullierme, Marie-Pierre / Tournigand, Christophe / Hammel, Pascal. ·INSERM UMR1149, Bichat-Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, and 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France; Department of Digestive Oncology, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France; Department of Medical Oncology, Henri Mondor University Hospital, 51 avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 94010 Créteil, France. Electronic address: cindy.neuzillet@orange.fr. · Department of Translational Research, AAREC Filia Research, 1 place Paul Verlaine, 92100 Boulogne-Billancourt, France. · Department of Clinical Pharmacy, Necker-Enfants Malades University Hospital, 149 Rue de Sèvres, 75015 Paris, France. · INSERM UMR1149, Bichat-Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, and 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France; Department of Pathology, Bichat-Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, and 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Department of Biliary and Pancreatic Surgery, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Department of Radiology, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Henri Mondor University Hospital, 51 avenue du Maréchal de Lattre de Tassigny, 94010 Créteil, France. · INSERM UMR1149, Bichat-Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 46 rue Henri Huchard, 75018 Paris, and 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France; Department of Digestive Oncology, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP - PRES Paris 7 Diderot), 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110 Clichy, France. ·Pharmacol Ther · Pubmed #26299994.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is expected to become the second cause of cancer-related death in 2030. PDAC is the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive tract, with 80% of patients having advanced disease at diagnosis and 5-year survival rate not exceeding 7%. Until 2010, gemcitabine was the only validated therapy for advanced PDAC with a modest improvement in median overall survival as compared to best supportive care (5-6 vs 3 months). Multiple phase II-III studies have used various combinations of gemcitabine with other cytotoxics or targeted agents, most in vain, in attempt to improve this outcome. Over the past few years, the landscape of PDAC management has undergone major and rapid changes with the approval of the FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel regimens in patients with metastatic disease. These two active combination chemotherapy options yield an improved median overall survival (11.1 vs 8.5 months, respectively) thus making longer survival a reasonably achievable goal. This breakthrough raises some new clinical questions about the management of PDAC. Moreover, better knowledge of the environmental and genetic events that underpin multistep carcinogenesis and of the microenvironment surrounding cancer cells in PDAC has open new perspectives and therapeutic opportunities. In this new dynamic context of deep transformation in basic research and clinical management aspects of the disease, we gathered updated preclinical and clinical data in a multifaceted review encompassing the lessons learned from the past, the yet unanswered questions, and the most promising research priorities to be addressed for the next 5 years.

10 Review [Pancreatic adenocarcinoma: 10 years of progress]. 2015

Hammel, Pascal / Neuzillet, Cindy / Bendaoud, Sihem / Lekhal, Céline / de Mestier, Louis / Hentic, Olivia. ·Service d'oncologie digestive, hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP), Faculté Denis Diderot-Paris VII, DHU Unité, 92110 Clichy, France. Electronic address: pascal.hammel@bjn.aphp.fr. · Service d'oncologie digestive, hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP), Faculté Denis Diderot-Paris VII, DHU Unité, 92110 Clichy, France; Service d'oncologie médicale, hôpital Mondor (AP-HP), 94000 Créteil, France. · Service d'oncologie digestive, hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP), Faculté Denis Diderot-Paris VII, DHU Unité, 92110 Clichy, France. · Service d'hépato-gastroentérologie, CHU Robert Debré, avenue du Général Koenig 51092 Reims, France. · Service de pancréatologie, hôpital Beaujon (AP-HP), Faculté Denis Diderot-Paris VII, DHU Unité, 92110 Clichy, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #26118879.

ABSTRACT: Despite the pejorative prognosis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma, significant progress has been made during the past decade at all steps of tumour development. Sporadic preneoplastic lesions are better recognized and a case-by-case prophylactic resection can be proposed. Both the identification and the screening of relatives at risk are in development. Availability of FOLFIRINOX and gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel combinations has stopped the long period of failures with gemcitabine doublets. Improvement in chemotherapy may benefit to borderline and locally-advanced forms of this cancer. They are now better evaluated by imaging and often, induction chemotherapy is proposed that allows to achieve a tumor control and then better select patients eligible for surgery in order to avoid unuseful/incomplete resection. The role of radiation therapy and other emerging local treatments merits further assessment. More robust data are needed for prognostic and predictive biomarkers to help in the choice of treatments. Finally, intensification of supportive care and shortened delay to access the treatment should be a major goal to improve the management of this disease.

11 Review [Management of metabolic disorders induced by everolimus in patients with differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: expert proposals]. 2014

Lombard-Bohas, Catherine / Cariou, Bertrand / Vergès, Bruno / Coriat, Romain / N'guyen, Thierry / François, Eric / Hammel, Pascal / Niccoli, Patricia / Hentic, Olivia. ·Hospices civils de Lyon, Pavillon H, hôpital E-Herriot, service d'oncologie médicale, place d'Arsonval, 69437 Lyon cedex 03, France. · CHU Nantes, clinique d'endocrinologie, 44093 Nantes cedex 1, France. · CHU de Dijon, hôpital du Bocage, service endocrinologie, diabétologie, 14, rue Paul-Gaffarel, 21000 Dijon, France. · Hôpital Cochin, service de gastroentérologie, 27, rue du Faubourg-Saint-Jacques, 75014 Paris, France. · CHRU, hôpital Jean Minjoz, service d'Oncologie, 2, boulevard Fleming, 25030 Besançon, France. · Centre Antoine Lacassagne, 33, avenue Valombrose, 06189 Nice, France. · Hôpital Beaujon, service de gastroentérologie-pancréatologie (PMAD), 100, boulevard du Général-Leclerc, 92118 Clichy, France. · CHU de La Timone, 254, rue Saint-Pierre, 13385 Marseille cedex, France. ·Bull Cancer · Pubmed #24557872.

ABSTRACT: Medical management of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors has recently been improved by new molecules of which the mTOR inhibitor everolimus. If digestive neuroendocrine tumors are rare, the incidence is in constant increase and the prevalence in digestive cancers put them right behind colorectal cancers. Everolimus has demonstrated efficacy in unresectable and progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, by doubling the median progression free survival (11 versus 4.6 months), with a median time of exposure to everolimus of nine months. Everolimus is generally maintained until progression or intolerance and some patients are treated during several years. Potential metabolic disorders induced by everolimus (dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia) in patients with life expectancy of several years, justify monitoring of these parameters and accurate treatment management algorithm. These will avoid worsening patient's prognostic, but also prematurely discontinue potentially effective treatment or contraindicate other therapeutic weapons, in a pathology in which there are multiple therapeutic options in metastatic phase. We propose a standard practice in terms of initial assessment, monitoring, care threshold, and therapeutic objectives to manage metabolic disorders, fitted to our patients with advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

12 Review Stromal expression of SPARC in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2013

Neuzillet, Cindy / Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï / Cros, Jérôme / Faivre, Sandrine / Hammel, Pascal / Raymond, Eric. ·Department of Medical Oncology (INSERM U728-PRES Paris 7 Diderot), Beaujon University Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110, Clichy-La-Garenne, France. ·Cancer Metastasis Rev · Pubmed #23690170.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) stands as the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive tract, with a 5-year survival rate of less than 5%. Therapeutic options for unresectable PDAC are extremely limited and there is a pressing need for expanded therapeutic approaches to improve current options available with gemcitabine-based regimens. With PDAC displaying one of the most prominent desmoplastic stromal reactions of all carcinomas, recent research has focused on the microenvironment surrounding PDAC cells. Secreted protein acid and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which is overexpressed in PDAC, may display tumor suppressor functions in several cancers (e.g., in colorectal, ovarian, prostate cancers, and acute myelogenous leukemia) but also appears to be overexpressed in other tumor types (e.g., breast cancer, melanoma, and glioblastoma). The apparent contradictory functions of SPARC may yield inhibition of angiogenesis via inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor, while promoting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and invasion through matrix metalloprotease expression. This feature is of particular interest in PDAC where SPARC overexpression in the stroma stands along with inhibition of angiogenesis and promotion of cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Several therapeutic strategies to deplete stromal tissue have been developed. In this review, we focused on key preclinical and clinical data describing the role of SPARC in PDAC biology, the properties, and mechanisms of delivery of drugs that interact with SPARC and discuss the proof-of-concept clinical trials using nab-paclitaxel.

13 Review Targeting the Ras-ERK pathway in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2013

Neuzillet, Cindy / Hammel, Pascal / Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï / Couvelard, Anne / Raymond, Eric. ·INSERM U728 and Department of Medical Oncology, Beaujon University Hospital (AP-HP Paris 7 Diderot), Clichy, France. ·Cancer Metastasis Rev · Pubmed #23085856.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PAC) stands as the poorest prognostic tumor of the digestive tract with limited therapeutic options. PAC carcinogenesis is associated with the loss of function of tumor suppressor genes such as INK4A, TP53, BRCA2, and DPC4, and only a few activated oncogenes among which K-RAS mutations are the most prevalent. The K-RAS mutation occurs early in PAC carcinogenesis, driving downstream activation of MEK and ERK1/2 which promote survival, invasion, and migration of cancer cells. In PAC models, inhibition of members of the Ras-ERK pathway blocks cellular proliferation and metastasis development. As oncogenic Ras does not appear to be a suitable drug target, inhibitors targeting downstream kinases including Raf and MEK have been developed and are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. In this review, we describe the role of the Ras-ERK pathway in pancreatic carcinogenesis and as a new therapeutic target for the treatment of PAC.

14 Review Resistance to targeted therapies in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs): molecular basis, preclinical data, and counteracting strategies. 2012

Tijeras-Raballand, Annemilaï / Neuzillet, Cindy / Couvelard, Anne / Serova, Maria / de Gramont, Armand / Hammel, Pascal / Raymond, Eric / Faivre, Sandrine. ·Pre Clinical Department, AAREC Filia Research, Boulogne-Billancourt, France. araballand@aarec-filia-research.com ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #22923165.

ABSTRACT: Management of advanced pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNETs) is challenging. Chemotherapy has remained for decades the only validated therapeutic option, with debated efficacy. Recently, data from two large placebo-controlled phase III trials have demonstrated that targeted therapies directed against receptor of vascular endothelial growth factor (sunitinib) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) (everolimus) produced clinically significant improvement in patients with advanced PNETs, resulting in a doubling of progression free survival and leading to their FDA approval. However, as more patients have been treated following the approval of those drugs, reports of early progression, and tumor regrowth following initial responses strongly suggested that primary and acquired resistances may limit the efficacy of targeted therapies in PNETs. In this review, we aim to summarize the current knowledge about primary and acquired resistance to targeted therapies, i.e., antiangiogenic agents and mTOR inhibitors, using data available from preclinical and clinical studies in various malignancies. Herein, we also describe how these general mechanisms of resistance may emerge in PNETs in patients treated with sunitinib and everolimus. Overcoming such resistances is likely to be the next challenge for clinicians in advanced PNETs management, warranting seeking for new anticancer strategies.

15 Review Sunitinib in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. 2012

Raymond, Eric / Hammel, Pascal / Dreyer, Chantal / Maatescu, Christian / Hentic, Olivia / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Faivre, Sandrine. ·Department of Medical Oncology (INSERM U728-Paris 7 Diderot University), Beaujon University Hospital, 100 boulevard du Général Leclerc, 92110, Clichy, France. eric.raymond@bjn.aphp.fr ·Target Oncol · Pubmed #22661319.

ABSTRACT: Sunitinib is an oral multitarget tyrosine kinase inhibitor with potent antiangiogenic properties. Preclinical data have demonstrated that pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors depend on vascular endothelial growth factor receptors and platelet growth factor receptors-signaling pathways for tumor angiogenesis. Sunitinib has recently been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced, progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Sunitinib has demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements in progression-free survival in a double-blinded randomized trial against placebo, setting progression-free survival as a valid endpoint for the evaluation of novel agents in patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Although patients who progressed in this phase III trial were allowed to cross-over, a trend toward improvement in overall survival was also observed. In this trial, side effects reported with sunitinib were those previously reported in other tumor types, including hand-foot syndrome, diarrhea, and hypertension. This trial also investigated patient-reported outcome and showed that treatment with sunitinib did not affect quality of life of patient. Interestingly, this trial showed that sunitinib could be combined with somatostatin analogues without affecting the safety profile of either sunitinib or somatostatin analogues. Since the overall survival of patients with well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors remains sufficiently long, it is worth considering using alternate sequences of targeted therapy (such as everolimus) and chemotherapy to optimize the care of patients with advanced diseases. The optimal sequence for using chemotherapy, everolimus, and sunitinib will remain to be established in clinical trials.

16 Review Prognostic factors for resectable pancreatic adenocarcinoma. 2011

Neuzillet, C / Sauvanet, A / Hammel, P. ·Pôle des maladies de l'appareil digestif, hôpital Beaujon, 100, boulevard Leclerc, 92118 Clichy cedex, France. ·J Visc Surg · Pubmed #21924695.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma represents 90% of pancreatic cancers and the fifth cause of cancer death in Western countries. Overall survival rate at 5 years is less than 5%. Surgical resection is still the only treatment providing prolonged survival but, even after a curative resection, 5-year survival rates are low. However, some patients have a slower tumor progression and increased median survival due to treatment advances and better patient selection. The objective of this review is to analyze the prognostic factors related to patient, treatment and tumor, to identify those associated with better long-term survival after resection of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

17 Clinical Trial Maintenance Olaparib for Germline 2019

Golan, Talia / Hammel, Pascal / Reni, Michele / Van Cutsem, Eric / Macarulla, Teresa / Hall, Michael J / Park, Joon-Oh / Hochhauser, Daniel / Arnold, Dirk / Oh, Do-Youn / Reinacher-Schick, Anke / Tortora, Giampaolo / Algül, Hana / O'Reilly, Eileen M / McGuinness, David / Cui, Karen Y / Schlienger, Katia / Locker, Gershon Y / Kindler, Hedy L. ·From the Oncology Institute, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel (T.G.) · Hôpital Beaujon (Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris), Clichy, and University Paris VII, Paris (P.H.) · IRCCS Ospedale San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan (M.R.), Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata Verona, Verona (G.T.), and Fondazione Policlinico Universitario Gemelli IRCCS, Rome (G.T.) - all in Italy · University Hospitals Gasthuisberg and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium (E.V.C.) · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Vall d'Hebron Institute of Oncology, Barcelona (T.M.) · Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia (M.J.H.) · Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (J.-O.P.), and Seoul National University Hospital, Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University College of Medicine (D.-Y.O.) - both in Seoul, South Korea · University College London Cancer Institute, London (D.H.), and AstraZeneca, Cambridge (D.M.) - both in the United Kingdom · Asklepios Tumorzentrum Hamburg Asklepios Klinik Altona, Hamburg (D.A.), St. Josef-Hospital, Ruhr University Bochum, Bochum (A.R.-S.), and Klinikum rechts der Isar, Department of Internal Medicine II, Technische Universität München, Munich (H.A.) - all in Germany · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York (E.M.O.) · AstraZeneca, Gaithersburg, MD (K.Y.C., G.Y.L.) · Merck, Kenilworth, NJ (K.S.) · and the University of Chicago, Chicago (H.L.K.). ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #31157963.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with a germline METHODS: We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 3 trial to evaluate the efficacy of olaparib as maintenance therapy in patients who had a germline RESULTS: Of the 3315 patients who underwent screening, 154 underwent randomization and were assigned to a trial intervention (92 to receive olaparib and 62 to receive placebo). The median progression-free survival was significantly longer in the olaparib group than in the placebo group (7.4 months vs. 3.8 months; hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35 to 0.82; P = 0.004). An interim analysis of overall survival, at a data maturity of 46%, showed no difference between the olaparib and placebo groups (median, 18.9 months vs. 18.1 months; hazard ratio for death, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.56 to 1.46; P = 0.68). There was no significant between-group difference in health-related quality of life, as indicated by the overall change from baseline in the global quality-of-life score (on a 100-point scale, with higher scores indicating better quality of life) based on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (between-group difference, -2.47 points; 95% CI, -7.27 to 2.33). The incidence of grade 3 or higher adverse events was 40% in the olaparib group and 23% in the placebo group (between-group difference, 16 percentage points; 95% CI, -0.02 to 31); 5% and 2% of the patients, respectively, discontinued the trial intervention because of an adverse event. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with a germline

18 Clinical Trial FOLFIRINOX or Gemcitabine as Adjuvant Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer. 2018

Conroy, Thierry / Hammel, Pascal / Hebbar, Mohamed / Ben Abdelghani, Meher / Wei, Alice C / Raoul, Jean-Luc / Choné, Laurence / Francois, Eric / Artru, Pascal / Biagi, James J / Lecomte, Thierry / Assenat, Eric / Faroux, Roger / Ychou, Marc / Volet, Julien / Sauvanet, Alain / Breysacher, Gilles / Di Fiore, Frédéric / Cripps, Christine / Kavan, Petr / Texereau, Patrick / Bouhier-Leporrier, Karine / Khemissa-Akouz, Faiza / Legoux, Jean-Louis / Juzyna, Béata / Gourgou, Sophie / O'Callaghan, Christopher J / Jouffroy-Zeller, Claire / Rat, Patrick / Malka, David / Castan, Florence / Bachet, Jean-Baptiste / Anonymous2681306. ·From the Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine and Université de Lorraine (T.C.) and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (L.C.), Nancy, Hôpital Beaujon and University Paris VII, Clichy (P.H., A.S.), Hôpital Huriez, Lille (M.H.), Centre Paul Strauss, Strasbourg (M.B.A.), Institut Paoli-Calmettes, Marseille (J.-L.R.), Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, Nice (E.F.), Hôpital Jean-Mermoz, Lyon (P.A.), Hôpital Trousseau, Tours (T.L.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Saint-Eloi (E.A.) and Institut du Cancer de Montpellier-Val d'Aurelle, Université de Montpellier (M.Y., S.G., F.C.), Montpellier, Centre Hospitalier Départemental Vendée, La Roche-sur-Yon (R.F.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Robert Debré, Reims (J.V.), Hôpital Louis Pasteur, Colmar (G.B.), Normandie University, Rouen University Hospital, Rouen (F.D.F.), Hôpital Layné, Mont-de-Marsan (P.T.), Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Côte de Nacre, Caen (K.B.-L.), Hôpital Saint-Jean, Perpignan (F.K.-A.), Centre Hospitalier Régional, Orléans (J.-L.L.), R&D Unicancer (B.J., C.J.-Z.) and Sorbonne Université, Hôpitaux Universitaires Pitié-Salpétrière, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris (J.-B.B.), Paris, Gustave Roussy, Université Paris-Saclay, Villejuif (D.M.), and Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Dijon (P.R.) - all in France · and the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto (A.C.W.), Kingston General Hospital (J.J.B.) and the Canadian Cancer Trials Group, Queen's University (C.J.O.), Kingston, ON, the Ottawa Health Research Institute, Ottawa (C.C.), and Segal Cancer Centre, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal (P.K.) - all in Canada. ·N Engl J Med · Pubmed #30575490.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Among patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer, combination chemotherapy with fluorouracil, leucovorin, irinotecan, and oxaliplatin (FOLFIRINOX) leads to longer overall survival than gemcitabine therapy. We compared the efficacy and safety of a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen with gemcitabine as adjuvant therapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We randomly assigned 493 patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma to receive a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen (oxaliplatin [85 mg per square meter of body-surface area], irinotecan [180 mg per square meter, reduced to 150 mg per square meter after a protocol-specified safety analysis], leucovorin [400 mg per square meter], and fluorouracil [2400 mg per square meter] every 2 weeks) or gemcitabine (1000 mg per square meter on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks) for 24 weeks. The primary end point was disease-free survival. Secondary end points included overall survival and safety. RESULTS: At a median follow-up of 33.6 months, the median disease-free survival was 21.6 months in the modified-FOLFIRINOX group and 12.8 months in the gemcitabine group (stratified hazard ratio for cancer-related event, second cancer, or death, 0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46 to 0.73; P<0.001). The disease-free survival rate at 3 years was 39.7% in the modified-FOLFIRINOX group and 21.4% in the gemcitabine group. The median overall survival was 54.4 months in the modified-FOLFIRINOX group and 35.0 months in the gemcitabine group (stratified hazard ratio for death, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.86; P=0.003). The overall survival rate at 3 years was 63.4% in the modified-FOLFIRINOX group and 48.6% in the gemcitabine group. Adverse events of grade 3 or 4 occurred in 75.9% of the patients in the modified-FOLFIRINOX group and in 52.9% of those in the gemcitabine group. One patient in the gemcitabine group died from toxic effects (interstitial pneumonitis). CONCLUSIONS: Adjuvant therapy with a modified FOLFIRINOX regimen led to significantly longer survival than gemcitabine among patients with resected pancreatic cancer, at the expense of a higher incidence of toxic effects. (Funded by R&D Unicancer and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01526135 ; EudraCT number, 2011-002026-52 .).

19 Clinical Trial Phase I/II trial of pimasertib plus gemcitabine in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2018

Van Cutsem, Eric / Hidalgo, Manuel / Canon, Jean-Luc / Macarulla, Teresa / Bazin, Igor / Poddubskaya, Elena / Manojlovic, Nebojsa / Radenkovic, Dejan / Verslype, Chris / Raymond, Eric / Cubillo, Antonio / Schueler, Armin / Zhao, Charles / Hammel, Pascal. ·Gastroenterology/Digestive Oncology, University Hospitals Gasthuisberg/Leuven & KULeuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Centro Nacional Investigaciones Oncologicas, Madrid, Spain and START Madrid, Madrid, Spain. · Service d'Oncologie-Hématologie, Grand Hopital de Charleroi, Charleroi, Belgium. · Gastrointestinal Cancer Unit, Oncology Department, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Clinical Pharmacology and Chemotherapy, N.N. Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center, and I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University, Moscow, Russia. · Clinic for Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Military Medical Academy of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia. · First Surgical Clinic, Clinical Center of Serbia, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Serbia. · Medical Oncology Département, Saint Joseph Hospital, Paris, France. · HM Universitario Sanchinarro, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal (HM-CIOCC), and Departamento de Ciencias Médicas Clínicas, Universidad CEU San Pablo, Madrid, Spain. · Biostatistics, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt, Germany. · Clinical Oncology Early Development, EMD Serono, Billerica, MA. · Digestive Oncology Unit, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France. ·Int J Cancer · Pubmed #29756206.

ABSTRACT: The selective MEK1/2 inhibitor pimasertib has shown anti-tumour activity in a pancreatic tumour model. This phase I/II, two-part trial was conducted in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (mPaCa) (NCT01016483). In the phase I part, oral pimasertib was given once daily discontinuously (5 days on/2 days off treatment) or twice daily continuously (n = 53) combined with weekly gemcitabine (1,000 mg/m

20 Clinical Trial Nab-paclitaxel plus either gemcitabine or simplified leucovorin and fluorouracil as first-line therapy for metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (AFUGEM GERCOR): a non-comparative, multicentre, open-label, randomised phase 2 trial. 2017

Bachet, Jean-Baptiste / Hammel, Pascal / Desramé, Jérôme / Meurisse, Aurélia / Chibaudel, Benoist / André, Thierry / Debourdeau, Philippe / Dauba, Jérome / Lecomte, Thierry / Seitz, Jean-François / Tournigand, Christophe / Aparicio, Thomas / Meyer, Véronique Guerin / Taieb, Julien / Volet, Julien / Monier, Amandine / Bonnetain, Franck / Louvet, Christophe. ·Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Paris, France; Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Groupe hospitalier Pitié Salpêtrière, Paris, France. Electronic address: jean-baptiste.bachet@aphp.fr. · Department of Digestive Oncology, Hôpital Beaujon, Paris, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Hôpital Privé Jean Mermoz, Lyon, France. · Department of Methodology and Quality of Life in Oncology, INSERM UMR 1098, Hôpital Universitaire de Besancon, Paris, France. · Department of Oncology, Institut Franco-Britannique, Levallois-Perret, Paris, France. · Department of Oncology, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. · Department of Oncology, Institut Saint Catherine, Avignon, France. · Department of Oncology, Hôpital Layne Mont de Marsan, Mont de Marsan, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, Hôpital Trousseau, Tours, France. · CHU La Timone, Marseille, France. · Department of Oncology, CHU Henri Mondor, Créteil, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, CHU Avicenne, Bobigny, France. · Department of Oncology, Institut de cancérologie de L'Ouest Paul Papin, Angers, France. · Department of Gastroenterology and Digestive Oncology, Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, Paris, France. · Department of Hepato-Gastroenterology, CHU Robert Debré, Reims, France. · GERCOR (Groupe Coopérateur Multidisciplinaire en Oncologie), Paris, France. · Department of Oncology, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. ·Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #28397697.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine has become a standard treatment regimen in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma; however, retrospective data suggest that gemcitabine might be inefficient in 50-60% of patients and thus not an optimum regimen in combination with nab-paclitaxel. We did a phase 2 trial to assess the activity and safety of a new regimen of nab-paclitaxel plus simplified leucovorin and fluorouracil. METHODS: We did a non-comparative, multicentre, open-label, randomised phase 2 trial in 15 hospitals and institutions in France. Eligible participants were previously untreated patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (previous adjuvant chemotherapy after curative intent resection was allowed if the interval between the end of chemotherapy and relapse was more than 12 months). Patients had to have at least one measurable lesion assessed by CT scan or MRI and an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 2 or less. We randomly assigned participants (1:2) centrally to 28-day cycles of either gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel or simplified leucovorin and fluorouracil plus nab-paclitaxel. The randomisation was by minimisation, stratified by centre and ECOG performance status. Drugs were administered in each cycle as follows: nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m FINDINGS: Between Dec 12, 2013, and Oct 31, 2014, we randomly assigned 114 patients to treatment: 75 patients to the leucovorin and fluorouracil group and 39 to the gemcitabine group. One patient in the leucovorin and fluorouracil group did not have a 4-month assessment, and was thus excluded from the modified ITT analysis. Median follow-up was 13·1 months (95% CI 12·5-14·1). At 4 months, 40 (56%, 90% CI 45-66) of 72 patients in the leucovorin and fluorouracil group were alive and free from disease progression (21 [54%, 40-68] of 39 patients in the gemcitabine group were also alive and progression-free at 4 months). Grade 3-4 adverse events occurred in 33 (87%) of 38 patients in the gemcitabine group and in 56 (77%) of 73 patients in the leucovorin and fluorouracil group, with different toxicity profiles. The most common grade 3-4 adverse events in the leucovorin and fluorouracil group were neutropenia without fever (17 [23%]), fatigue (16 [22%]), paraesthesia (14 [19%]), diarrhoea (nine [12%]), and mucositis (seven [10%]); in the gemcitabine group they were neutropenia without fever (12 [32%]), thrombocytopenia (seven [18%]), fatigue (eight [21%]), anaemia (five [13%]), increased alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase concentrations (five [13%] for both), and paraesthesia (four [11%]). Two participants died; one in the leucovorin and fluorouracil group from septic shock, and one in the gemcitabine group from diabetes compensation with acidosis; these deaths were deemed to be not related to treatment. Treatment-related serious adverse events occurred in 28 (38%) of 73 patients in the leucovorin and fluorouracil group and in 14 (37%) of 38 in the gemcitabine group. INTERPRETATION: Nab-paclitaxel plus simplified leucovorin and fluorouracil fulfilled the primary endpoint in that more than the required 50% of our study population were progression-free at 4 months, with a tolerable toxicity profile. This regimen thus deserves further assessment in a phase 3 trial. FUNDING: GERCOR (Groupe Coopérateur Multidisciplinaire en Oncologie) and Celgene through grants to GERCOR.

21 Clinical Trial Comparison of adjuvant gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer (ESPAC-4): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial. 2017

Neoptolemos, John P / Palmer, Daniel H / Ghaneh, Paula / Psarelli, Eftychia E / Valle, Juan W / Halloran, Christopher M / Faluyi, Olusola / O'Reilly, Derek A / Cunningham, David / Wadsley, Jonathan / Darby, Suzanne / Meyer, Tim / Gillmore, Roopinder / Anthoney, Alan / Lind, Pehr / Glimelius, Bengt / Falk, Stephen / Izbicki, Jakob R / Middleton, Gary William / Cummins, Sebastian / Ross, Paul J / Wasan, Harpreet / McDonald, Alec / Crosby, Tom / Ma, Yuk Ting / Patel, Kinnari / Sherriff, David / Soomal, Rubin / Borg, David / Sothi, Sharmila / Hammel, Pascal / Hackert, Thilo / Jackson, Richard / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous2721324. ·University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Research Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden. · University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. · Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, Bristol, UK. · University of Hamburg Medical institutions UKE, Hamburg, Germany. · Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, UK. · Guy's Hospital, London, UK. · Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK. · Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK. · Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich, UK. · Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · University Hospital Coventry, Coventry, UK. · Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France. · University of Heidelberg, Germany. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28129987.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ESPAC-3 trial showed that adjuvant gemcitabine is the standard of care based on similar survival to and less toxicity than adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Other clinical trials have shown better survival and tumour response with gemcitabine and capecitabine than with gemcitabine alone in advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine and capecitabine compared with gemcitabine monotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We did a phase 3, two-group, open-label, multicentre, randomised clinical trial at 92 hospitals in England, Scotland, Wales, Germany, France, and Sweden. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older and had undergone complete macroscopic resection for ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (R0 or R1 resection). We randomly assigned patients (1:1) within 12 weeks of surgery to receive six cycles of either 1000 mg/m FINDINGS: Of 732 patients enrolled, 730 were included in the final analysis. Of these, 366 were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine and 364 to gemcitabine plus capecitabine. The Independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee requested reporting of the results after there were 458 (95%) of a target of 480 deaths. The median overall survival for patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group was 28·0 months (95% CI 23·5-31·5) compared with 25·5 months (22·7-27·9) in the gemcitabine group (hazard ratio 0·82 [95% CI 0·68-0·98], p=0·032). 608 grade 3-4 adverse events were reported by 226 of 359 patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group compared with 481 grade 3-4 adverse events in 196 of 366 patients in the gemcitabine group. INTERPRETATION: The adjuvant combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine should be the new standard of care following resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK.

22 Clinical Trial Sunitinib in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors: updated progression-free survival and final overall survival from a phase III randomized study. 2017

Faivre, S / Niccoli, P / Castellano, D / Valle, J W / Hammel, P / Raoul, J-L / Vinik, A / Van Cutsem, E / Bang, Y-J / Lee, S-H / Borbath, I / Lombard-Bohas, C / Metrakos, P / Smith, D / Chen, J-S / Ruszniewski, P / Seitz, J-F / Patyna, S / Lu, D R / Ishak, K J / Raymond, E. ·Medical Oncology and Gastroenterology Department, Service Inter-Hospitalier de Cancérologie, Hôpital Beaujon and Paris Diderot University, Clichy. · Cancer Care, Institut Paoli-Calmettes, and RENATEN Network, Marseille, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Medical Oncology Department, The University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Translational Medicine - Digestive Cancers, Institut Paoli-Calmettes and RENATEN Network, Marseille, France. · Eastern Virginia Medical School Streilitz Diabetes Research Center and Neuroendocrine Unit, Norfolk, USA. · Digestive Oncology Unit, University Hospitals Leuven and KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium. · Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Republic of Korea. · Hepato-Gastroenterology Unit, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels, Belgium. · Medical Oncology Department, Hôpital Edouard Herriot, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon, France. · McGill University Hospital Centre, Montreal, Canada. · Oncology Department, University Hospital, Bordeaux, France. · Linkou Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan. · Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Timone, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Marseille, Aix-Marseille Université, and RENATEN Network, Marseille, France. · Pfizer Oncology, La Jolla, USA. · Department of Evidera, St-Laurent, Canada. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #27836885.

ABSTRACT: Background: In a phase III trial in patients with advanced, well-differentiated, progressive pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, sunitinib 37.5 mg/day improved investigator-assessed progression-free survival (PFS) versus placebo (11.4 versus 5.5 months; HR, 0.42; P < 0.001). Here, we present PFS using retrospective blinded independent central review (BICR) and final median overall survival (OS), including an assessment highlighting the impact of patient crossover from placebo to sunitinib. Patients and methods: In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, cross-sectional imaging from patients was evaluated retrospectively by blinded third-party radiologists using a two-reader, two-time-point lock, followed by a sequential locked-read, batch-mode paradigm. OS was summarized using the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox proportional hazards model. Crossover-adjusted OS effect was derived using rank-preserving structural failure time (RPSFT) analyses. Results: Of 171 randomized patients (sunitinib, n = 86; placebo, n = 85), 160 (94%) had complete scan sets/time points. By BICR, median (95% confidence interval [CI]) PFS was 12.6 (11.1-20.6) months for sunitinib and 5.8 (3.8-7.2) months for placebo (HR, 0.32; 95% CI 0.18-0.55; P = 0.000015). Five years after study closure, median (95% CI) OS was 38.6 (25.6-56.4) months for sunitinib and 29.1 (16.4-36.8) months for placebo (HR, 0.73; 95% CI 0.50-1.06; P = 0.094), with 69% of placebo patients having crossed over to sunitinib. RPSFT analysis confirmed an OS benefit for sunitinib. Conclusions: BICR confirmed the doubling of PFS with sunitinib compared with placebo. Although the observed median OS improved by nearly 10 months, the effect estimate did not reach statistical significance, potentially due to crossover from placebo to sunitinib. Trial registration number: NCT00428597.

23 Clinical Trial Prognostic nomogram and score to predict overall survival in locally advanced untreated pancreatic cancer (PROLAP). 2016

Vernerey, Dewi / Huguet, Florence / Vienot, Angélique / Goldstein, David / Paget-Bailly, Sophie / Van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Glimelius, Bengt / Artru, Pascal / Moore, Malcolm J / André, Thierry / Mineur, Laurent / Chibaudel, Benoist / Benetkiewicz, Magdalena / Louvet, Christophe / Hammel, Pascal / Bonnetain, Franck. ·Methodological and Quality of Life in Oncology Unit, EA 3181, University Hospital of Besançon, 3 Boulevard Alexandre Fleming, Besançon 25030, France. · Oncology Multidisciplinary Research Group (GERCOR), 151 rue du Faubourg Saint Antoine, Paris 75011, France. · Department of Radiotherapy, Tenon Hospital (AP-HP), 4 rue de la Chine, Paris 75020, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Besançon, 3 Boulevard Alexandre Fleming, Besançon 25030, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales hospital and Prince of Wales Clinical school, UNSW, Sydney, New South Wales 2031, Australia. · AGITG (Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group), 119-143 Missenden Rd, Camperdown, New South Wales 2050, Australia. · Department of Gastroenterology, Erasme University Hospital, Route de Lennik 808, Brussels 1070, Belgium. · Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Science, University of Uppsala, Uppsala 75105, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Jean Mermoz Hospital, 55 avenue Mermoz, Lyon 69008, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada. · Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Antoine Hospital (AP-HP), 184 rue du Faubourg Saint Antoine, Paris 75011, France. · Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Sainte-Catherine Institute, 250 Chemin de Baigne Pieds, Avignon 84918, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Franco-British Hospital Institute, 3 Rue Barbès, Levallois-Perret 92300, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institute Mutualiste Montsouris, 42 Boulevard Jourdan, Paris 75014, France. · Department of Digestive Oncology, Beaujon Hospital (AP-HP), 100 boulevard du General Leclerc, Clichy 92110, France. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #27404456.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) patients remains controversial. Better discrimination for overall survival (OS) at diagnosis is needed. We address this issue by developing and validating a prognostic nomogram and a score for OS in LAPC (PROLAP). METHODS: Analyses were derived from 442 LAPC patients enrolled in the LAP07 trial. The prognostic ability of 30 baseline parameters was evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Performance assessment and internal validation of the final model were done with Harrell's C-index, calibration plot and bootstrap sample procedures. On the basis of the final model, a prognostic nomogram and a score were developed, and externally validated in 106 consecutive LAPC patients treated in Besançon Hospital, France. RESULTS: Age, pain, tumour size, albumin and CA 19-9 were independent prognostic factors for OS. The final model had good calibration, acceptable discrimination (C-index=0.60) and robust internal validity. The PROLAP score has the potential to delineate three different prognosis groups with median OS of 15.4, 11.7 and 8.5 months (log-rank P<0.0001). The score ability to discriminate OS was externally confirmed in 63 (59%) patients with complete clinical data derived from a data set of 106 consecutive LAPC patients; median OS of 18.3, 14.1 and 7.6 months for the three groups (log-rank P<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The PROLAP nomogram and score can accurately predict OS before initiation of induction chemotherapy in LAPC-untreated patients. They may help to optimise clinical trials design and might offer the opportunity to define risk-adapted strategies for LAPC management in the future.

24 Clinical Trial Effect of Chemoradiotherapy vs Chemotherapy on Survival in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Controlled After 4 Months of Gemcitabine With or Without Erlotinib: The LAP07 Randomized Clinical Trial. 2016

Hammel, Pascal / Huguet, Florence / van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Goldstein, David / Glimelius, Bengt / Artru, Pascal / Borbath, Ivan / Bouché, Olivier / Shannon, Jenny / André, Thierry / Mineur, Laurent / Chibaudel, Benoist / Bonnetain, Franck / Louvet, Christophe / Anonymous6180866. ·Department of Digestive Oncology, Beaujon Hospital (AP-HP), Clichy, France. · Department of Radiotherapy, Tenon Hospital (AP-HP), Paris, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Erasme University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia5Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG), Camperdown, Australia6Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Radiology, Oncology, and Radiation Science, University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Jean Mermoz Hospital, Lyon, France. · Department of Gastroenterology, Saint-Luc University Clinics, Brussels, Belgium. · Department of Gastroenterology, Robert Debré Hospital, Reims, France. · Australasian Gastrointestinal Trials Group (AGITG), Camperdown, Australia6Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia11Department of Medical Oncology, Nepean Hospital NSW, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Saint-Antoine Hospital (AP-HP), Paris, France. · Department of Radiotherapy and Medical Oncology, Sainte-Catherine Institute, Avignon, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Franco-British Hospital Institute, Levallois-Perret, France15Oncology Multidisciplinary Research Group (GERCOR), Paris, France. · Department of Methodology and Quality of Life in Oncology, Hospital Minjoz, Besançon, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Institute Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. ·JAMA · Pubmed #27139057.

ABSTRACT: IMPORTANCE: In locally advanced pancreatic cancer, the role of chemoradiotherapy is controversial and the efficacy of erlotinib is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To assess whether chemoradiotherapy improves overall survival of patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer controlled after 4 months of gemcitabine-based induction chemotherapy and to assess the effect of erlotinib on survival. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: In LAP07, an international, open-label, phase 3 randomized trial, 449 patients were enrolled between 2008 and 2011. Follow-up ended in February 2013. INTERVENTIONS: In the first randomization, 223 patients received 1000 mg/m2 weekly of gemcitabine alone and 219 patients received 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine plus 100 mg/d of erlotinib. In the second randomization involving patients with progression-free disease after 4 months, 136 patients received 2 months of the same chemotherapy and 133 underwent chemoradiotherapy (54 Gy plus capecitabine). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was overall survival from the date of the first randomization. Secondary outcomes were the effect of erlotinib and quality assurance of radiotherapy on overall survival, progression-free survival of gemcitabine-erlotinib and erlotinib maintenance with gemcitabine alone at the second randomization, and toxic effects. RESULTS: A total of 442 of the 449 patients (232 men; median age, 63.3 years) enrolled underwent the first randomization. Of these, 269 underwent the second randomization. Interim analysis was performed when 221 patients died (109 in the chemoradiotherapy group and 112 in the chemotherapy group), reaching the early stopping boundaries for futility. With a median follow-up of 36.7 months, the median overall survival from the date of the first randomization was not significantly different between chemotherapy at 16.5 months (95% CI, 14.5-18.5 months) and chemoradiotherapy at 15.2 months (95% CI, 13.9-17.3 months; hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% CI, 0.79-1.34; P = .83). Median overall survival from the date of the first randomization for the 223 patients receiving gemcitabine was 13.6 months (95% CI, 12.3-15.3 months) and was 11.9 months (95% CI, 10.4-13.5 months) for the 219 patients receiving gemcitabine plus erlotinib (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 0.97-1.45; P = .09; 188 deaths vs 191 deaths). Chemoradiotherapy was associated with decreased local progression (32% vs 46%, P = .03) and no increase in grade 3 to 4 toxicity, except for nausea. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: In this open-label, randomized trial involving patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer with disease controlled after 4 months of induction chemotherapy, there was no significant difference in overall survival with chemoradiotherapy compared with chemotherapy alone and there was no significant difference in overall survival with gemcitabine compared with gemcitabine plus erlotinib used as maintenance therapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00634725.

25 Clinical Trial A randomized phase II study of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine or simplified LV5FU2 as first-line therapy in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: the AFUGEM GERCOR trial. 2015

Bachet, Jean-Baptiste / Chibaudel, Benoist / Bonnetain, Franck / Validire, Pierre / Hammel, Pascal / André, Thierry / Louvet, Christophe / Anonymous110845. ·Paris-Sorbonne University, UPMC University Paris 06, Paris, France. jean-baptiste.bachet@psl.aphp.fr. · Department of hepatogastroenterology, Groupe hospitalier Pitié Salpêtrière, Paris, France. jean-baptiste.bachet@psl.aphp.fr. · Department of oncology, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. benoist.chibaudel@sat.aphp.fr. · Head of methodology and quality of life in oncology department, Hôpital Universitaire de Besancon, EA 3181, Besancon, France. franck.bonnetain@univ-fcomte.fr. · Department of pathology, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. pierre.validire@imm.fr. · Department of digestive oncology, Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France. pascal.hammel@bjn.aphp.fr. · Paris-Sorbonne University, UPMC University Paris 06, Paris, France. thierry.andre@sat.aphp.fr. · Department of oncology, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France. thierry.andre@sat.aphp.fr. · Department of oncology, Institut Mutualiste Montsouris, Paris, France. christophe.louvet@imm.fr. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #26445094.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PAC) prognosis remains dismal and gemcitabine monotherapy has been the standard treatment over the last decade. Currently, two first-line regimens are used in this setting: FOLFIRINOX and nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine. Increasing translational data on the predictive value of hENT1 for determining gemcitabine efficacy suggest that a non-gemcitabine-based regimen is favored in about 60 % of patients with PAC due to high resistance of PAC to this cytotoxic drug. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy of weekly nab-paclitaxel combined with gemcitabine or a simplified (s) LV5FU2 regimen in patients with previously untreated metastatic PAC. METHODS/DESIGN: AFUGEM is a two-stage, open-label, randomized, multicenter, phase II trial. Patients with PAC who meet the inclusion criteria and provide written informed consent will be randomized in a 1:2 ratio to either nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m(2)) plus gemcitabine (1000 mg/m(2)) given on days 1, 8, and 15 every 28 days or nab-paclitaxel (125 mg/m(2)) plus sLV5FU2 (leucovorin 400 mg/m(2) followed by bolus 400 mg/m(2) 5-fluorouracil and by 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m(2) as an 46-h intravenous infusion) given on days 1 and 15 every 28 days. A total of 114 patients will be randomized to one of the treatment arms. The primary endpoint is progression-free survival at 4 months. Secondary outcomes are rate and duration of response, disease control, overall survival, safety, and quality of life. Potential biomarkers of gemcitabine (hENT1, dCK) and 5-fluorouracil (TS) efficacy will be assessed. DISCUSSION: The AFUGEM trial is designed to provide valuable information regarding efficacy and tolerability of nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine and nab-paclitaxel plus sLV5FU2 regimens. Identification of potential predictive biomarkers of gemcitabine and 5-fluorouracil is likely to drive therapeutic decisions in patients with metastatic PAC. TRIAL REGISTRATION: AFUGEM is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01964534 , October 15, 2013.

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