Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Christopher M. Halloran
Based on 22 articles published since 2009
(Why 22 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, C. Halloran wrote the following 22 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Nanotechnology advances in upper gastrointestinal, liver and pancreatic cancer. 2012

Sykes, Paul D / Neoptolemos, John P / Costello, Eithne / Halloran, Christopher M. ·Liverpool Cancer Research UK Centre, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Studies, University of Liverpool, Daulby Street, Liverpool, L69 3GA, UK. ·Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #22646256.

ABSTRACT: Cancers of the upper GI tract, liver and pancreas have some of the poorest prognoses of any malignancies. Advances in diagnosis and treatment are sorely needed to improve the outcomes of patients. Nanotechnology offers the potential for constructing tailor-made therapies capable of targeting specific cancers. The particles themselves may be endowed with multifunctional properties that can be exploited for both diagnosis and treatment. Although development of therapies is still in the early stages, the use of nanoparticles (NPs) is widespread in diagnostic applications and will probably involve all areas of medicine in the future. Research into NPs is ongoing for upper gastrointestinal, liver and pancreatic cancers, and their use is becoming increasingly popular as contrast media for radiological investigations. Although more sophisticated technologies capable of active targeting are still in the early stages of assessment for clinical use, a small number of NP-based therapies are in clinical use.

2 Clinical Trial Cytoplasmic HuR Status Predicts Disease-free Survival in Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Post-hoc Analysis From the International Phase III ESPAC-3 Clinical Trial. 2018

Tatarian, Talar / Jiang, Wei / Leiby, Benjamin E / Grigoli, Amanda / Jimbo, Masaya / Dabbish, Nooreen / Neoptolemos, John P / Greenhalf, William / Costello, Eithne / Ghaneh, Paula / Halloran, Christopher / Palmer, Daniel / Buchler, Markus / Yeo, Charles J / Winter, Jordan M / Brody, Jonathan R. ·Jefferson Pancreas, Biliary, and Related Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Department of Pathology, Anatomy, and Cell Biology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA. · Institute of Translational Medicine, Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #27893535.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: We tested cytoplasmic HuR (cHuR) as a predictive marker for response to chemotherapy by examining tumor samples from the international European Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer-3 trial, in which patients with resected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) received either gemcitabine (GEM) or 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) adjuvant monotherapy. BACKGROUND: Previous studies have implicated the mRNA-binding protein, HuR (ELAVL1), as a predictive marker for PDA treatment response in the adjuvant setting. These studies were, however, based on small cohorts of patients outside of a clinical trial, or a clinical trial in which patients received multimodality therapy with concomitant radiation. METHODS: Tissue samples from 379 patients with PDA enrolled in the European Study Group of Pancreatic Cancer-3 trial were immunolabeled with an anti-HuR antibody and scored for cHuR expression. Patients were dichotomized into groups of high versus low cHuR expression. RESULTS: There was no association between cHuR expression and prognosis in the overall cohort [disease-free survival (DFS), P = 0.44; overall survival, P = 0.41). Median DFS for patients with high cHuR was significantly greater for patients treated with 5-FU compared to GEM [20.1 months, confidence interval (CI): 8.3-36.4 vs 10.9 months, CI: 7.5-14.2; P = 0.04]. Median DFS was similar between the treatment arms in patients with low cHuR (5-FU, 12.8 months, CI: 10.6-14.6 vs GEM, 12.9 months, CI: 11.2-15.4). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with high cHuR-expressing tumors may benefit from 5-FU-based adjuvant therapy as compared to GEM, whereas those patients with low cHuR appear to have no survival advantage with GEM compared with 5-FU. Further studies are needed to validate HuR as a biomarker in both future monotherapy and multiagent regimens.

3 Clinical Trial Comparison of adjuvant gemcitabine and capecitabine with gemcitabine monotherapy in patients with resected pancreatic cancer (ESPAC-4): a multicentre, open-label, randomised, phase 3 trial. 2017

Neoptolemos, John P / Palmer, Daniel H / Ghaneh, Paula / Psarelli, Eftychia E / Valle, Juan W / Halloran, Christopher M / Faluyi, Olusola / O'Reilly, Derek A / Cunningham, David / Wadsley, Jonathan / Darby, Suzanne / Meyer, Tim / Gillmore, Roopinder / Anthoney, Alan / Lind, Pehr / Glimelius, Bengt / Falk, Stephen / Izbicki, Jakob R / Middleton, Gary William / Cummins, Sebastian / Ross, Paul J / Wasan, Harpreet / McDonald, Alec / Crosby, Tom / Ma, Yuk Ting / Patel, Kinnari / Sherriff, David / Soomal, Rubin / Borg, David / Sothi, Sharmila / Hammel, Pascal / Hackert, Thilo / Jackson, Richard / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous2721324. ·University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · The Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · Manchester Royal Infirmary, Manchester, UK. · Royal Marsden Hospital, London, UK. · Weston Park Hospital, Sheffield, UK. · Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Clinical Research Sörmland, Eskilstuna, Sweden. · University of Uppsala, Uppsala, Sweden. · Bristol Haematology and Oncology Centre, Bristol, UK. · University of Hamburg Medical institutions UKE, Hamburg, Germany. · Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, UK. · Guy's Hospital, London, UK. · Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Velindre Hospital, Cardiff, UK. · Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, UK. · Churchill Hospital, Oxford, UK. · Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, UK. · Ipswich Hospital, Ipswich, UK. · Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden. · University Hospital Coventry, Coventry, UK. · Hôpital Beaujon, Clichy, France. · University of Heidelberg, Germany. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28129987.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The ESPAC-3 trial showed that adjuvant gemcitabine is the standard of care based on similar survival to and less toxicity than adjuvant 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid in patients with resected pancreatic cancer. Other clinical trials have shown better survival and tumour response with gemcitabine and capecitabine than with gemcitabine alone in advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. We aimed to determine the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine and capecitabine compared with gemcitabine monotherapy for resected pancreatic cancer. METHODS: We did a phase 3, two-group, open-label, multicentre, randomised clinical trial at 92 hospitals in England, Scotland, Wales, Germany, France, and Sweden. Eligible patients were aged 18 years or older and had undergone complete macroscopic resection for ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (R0 or R1 resection). We randomly assigned patients (1:1) within 12 weeks of surgery to receive six cycles of either 1000 mg/m FINDINGS: Of 732 patients enrolled, 730 were included in the final analysis. Of these, 366 were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine and 364 to gemcitabine plus capecitabine. The Independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee requested reporting of the results after there were 458 (95%) of a target of 480 deaths. The median overall survival for patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group was 28·0 months (95% CI 23·5-31·5) compared with 25·5 months (22·7-27·9) in the gemcitabine group (hazard ratio 0·82 [95% CI 0·68-0·98], p=0·032). 608 grade 3-4 adverse events were reported by 226 of 359 patients in the gemcitabine plus capecitabine group compared with 481 grade 3-4 adverse events in 196 of 366 patients in the gemcitabine group. INTERPRETATION: The adjuvant combination of gemcitabine and capecitabine should be the new standard of care following resection for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. FUNDING: Cancer Research UK.

4 Clinical Trial PANasta Trial; Cattell Warren versus Blumgart techniques of panreatico-jejunostomy following pancreato-duodenectomy: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial. 2016

Halloran, Christopher M / Platt, Kellie / Gerard, Abbie / Polydoros, Fotis / O'Reilly, Derek A / Gomez, Dhanwant / Smith, Andrew / Neoptolemos, John P / Soonwalla, Zahir / Taylor, Mark / Blazeby, Jane M / Ghaneh, Paula. ·National Institutes of Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit and Clinical Directorate of General Surgery, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and the University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA, UK. halloran@liverpool.ac.uk. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, The Duncan Building, Daulby Street, Liverpool, L69 3GA, UK. halloran@liverpool.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL, UK. kplatt@liverpool.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL, UK. agerard@liverpool.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL, UK. polydorf@liverpool.ac.uk. · Department of Surgery, Manchester Royal Infirmary, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9WL, UK. Derek.O'Reilly@cmft.nhs.uk. · Queen's Medical Center, Derby Road, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. Dhanny.Gomez@nuh.nhs.uk. · Department of Pancreatic Surgery, Abdominal Medicine and Surgery CSU, St James's University Hospital, 3rd Floor Bexley Wing, Leeds, LS9 7TF, UK. AndrewM.Smith@leedsth.nhs.uk. · National Institutes of Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit and Clinical Directorate of General Surgery, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and the University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA, UK. johnyboy@liverpool.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL, UK. johnyboy@liverpool.ac.uk. · Churchill Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Headington, Oxford, OX3 7LJ, UK. Zahir.Soonawalla@ouh.nhs.uk. · Mater Hospital, Belfast Health and Social care Trust, Crumlin Rd, Belfast, BT12 6AB, UK. Mark.Taylor@belfasttrust.hscni.net. · Bristol Center for Surgical Research, School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, BS8 2PS and University Hospitals Bristol NHS Foundation Trust, Bristol, BS2 8HW, UK. J.M.Blazeby@bristol.ac.uk. · National Institutes of Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit and Clinical Directorate of General Surgery, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust and the University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA, UK. paula@liverpool.ac.uk. · Cancer Research UK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Block C Waterhouse Building, 1-3 Brownlow Street, Liverpool, L69 3GL, UK. paula@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Trials · Pubmed #26772736.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Failure of the pancreatic remnant anastomosis to heal following pancreato-duodenectomy is a major cause of significant and life-threatening complications, notably a post-operative pancreatic fistula. Recently, non-randomized trials have shown superiority of a most intuitive anastomosis (Blumgart technique), which involves both a duct-to-mucosa and a full-thickness pancreatic "U" stitch, in effect a mattress stitch, over a standard duct-mucosa technique (Cattell-Warren). The aim of this study is to examine if these findings remain within a randomized setting. METHODS/DESIGN: The PANasta trial is a randomized, double-blinded multi-center study, whose primary aim is to assess whether a Blumgart pancreatic anastomosis (trial intervention) is superior to a Cattell-Warren pancreatic anastomosis (control intervention), in terms of pancreatic fistula rates. Patients with suspected malignancy of the pancreatic head, in whom a pancreato-duodenectomy is recommended, would be recruited from several UK specialist regional centers. The hypothesis to be tested is that a Blumgart anastomosis will reduce fistula rate from 20 to 10 %. Subjects will be stratified by research site, pancreatic consistency and diameter of pancreatic duct; giving a sample size of 253 per group. The primary outcome measure is fistula rate at the pancreatico-jejunostomy. Secondary outcome measures are: entry into adjuvant therapy, mortality, surgical complications, non-surgical complications, hospital stay, cancer-specific quality of life and health economic assessments. Enrolled patients will undergo pancreatic resection and be randomized immediately prior to pancreatic reconstruction. The operation note will only record "anastomosis constructed as per PANasta trial randomization," thus the other members of the trial team and patient are blinded. An inbuilt internal pilot study will assess the ability to randomize patients, while the construction of an operative manual and review of operative photographs will maintain standardization of techniques. DISCUSSION: The PANasta trial will be the first multi-center randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing two types of duct-to-mucosa pancreatic anastomosis with surgical quality assurance. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN52263879 . Date of registration 15 January 2015.

5 Clinical Trial Effect of adjuvant chemotherapy with fluorouracil plus folinic acid or gemcitabine vs observation on survival in patients with resected periampullary adenocarcinoma: the ESPAC-3 periampullary cancer randomized trial. 2012

Neoptolemos, John P / Moore, Malcolm J / Cox, Trevor F / Valle, Juan W / Palmer, Daniel H / McDonald, Alexander C / Carter, Ross / Tebbutt, Niall C / Dervenis, Christos / Smith, David / Glimelius, Bengt / Charnley, Richard M / Lacaine, François / Scarfe, Andrew G / Middleton, Mark R / Anthoney, Alan / Ghaneh, Paula / Halloran, Christopher M / Lerch, Markus M / Oláh, Attila / Rawcliffe, Charlotte L / Verbeke, Caroline S / Campbell, Fiona / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous1780731. ·Institute of Translational Medicine, Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool Cancer Research United Kingdom Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, England, United Kingdom. j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk ·JAMA · Pubmed #22782416.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Patients with periampullary adenocarcinomas undergo the same resectional surgery as that of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. Although adjuvant chemotherapy has been shown to have a survival benefit for pancreatic cancer, there have been no randomized trials for periampullary adenocarcinomas. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adjuvant chemotherapy (fluorouracil or gemcitabine) provides improved overall survival following resection. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS: The European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC)-3 periampullary trial, an open-label, phase 3, randomized controlled trial (July 2000-May 2008) in 100 centers in Europe, Australia, Japan, and Canada. Of the 428 patients included in the primary analysis, 297 had ampullary, 96 had bile duct, and 35 had other cancers. INTERVENTIONS: One hundred forty-four patients were assigned to the observation group, 143 patients to receive 20 mg/m2 of folinic acid via intravenous bolus injection followed by 425 mg/m2 of fluorouracil via intravenous bolus injection administered 1 to 5 days every 28 days, and 141 patients to receive 1000 mg/m2 of intravenous infusion of gemcitabine once a week for 3 of every 4 weeks for 6 months. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome measure was overall survival with chemotherapy vs no chemotherapy; secondary measures were chemotherapy type, toxic effects, progression-free survival, and quality of life. RESULTS: Eighty-eight patients (61%) in the observation group, 83 (58%) in the fluorouracil plus folinic acid group, and 73 (52%) in the gemcitabine group died. In the observation group, the median survival was 35.2 months (95%% CI, 27.2-43.0 months) and was 43.1 (95%, CI, 34.0-56.0) in the 2 chemotherapy groups (hazard ratio, 0.86; (95% CI, 0.66-1.11; χ2 = 1.33; P = .25). After adjusting for independent prognostic variables of age, bile duct cancer, poor tumor differentiation, and positive lymph nodes and after conducting multiple regression analysis, the hazard ratio for chemotherapy compared with observation was 0.75 (95% CI, 0.57-0.98; Wald χ2 = 4.53, P = .03). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with resected periampullary adenocarcinoma, adjuvant chemotherapy, compared with observation, was not associated with a significant survival benefit in the primary analysis; however, multivariable analysis adjusting for prognostic variables demonstrated a statistically significant survival benefit associated with adjuvant chemotherapy. TRIAL REGISTRATION: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00058201.

6 Article Identification of Cystic Lesions by Secondary Screening of Familial Pancreatic Cancer (FPC) Kindreds Is Not Associated with the Stratified Risk of Cancer. 2019

Sheel, A R G / Harrison, S / Sarantitis, I / Nicholson, J A / Hanna, T / Grocock, C / Raraty, M / Ramesh, J / Farooq, A / Costello, E / Jackson, R / Chapman, M / Smith, A / Carter, R / Mckay, C / Hamady, Z / Aithal, G P / Mountford, R / Ghaneh, P / Hammel, P / Lerch, M M / Halloran, C / Pereira, S P / Greenhalf, W. ·Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 3GA, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, London, UK. · Department of Radiology, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, London, UK. · Institute for Liver & Digestive Health, University College London, London, UK. · Department of Pancreatico-Biliary Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospital Trust, Leeds, UK. · West of Scotland Pancreatic unit, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Diseases, University Hospital Southampton, Southampton, UK. · NIHR Nottingham Biomedical Research Centre, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH, UK. · Mersey Regional Molecular Genetics Laboratory, Liverpool Women's Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Service de Gastroentérologie-Pancréatologie, Pôle des Maladies de l'Appareil Digestif, Hôpital Beaujon, 92118, Clichy Cedex, France. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Sauerbruch-Strasse, 17475, Greifswald, Germany. ·Am J Gastroenterol · Pubmed #30353057.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are associated with risk of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). It is unclear if an IPMN in individuals at high risk of PDAC should be considered as a positive screening result or as an incidental finding. Stratified familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) populations were used to determine if IPMN risk is linked to familial risk of PDAC. METHODS: This is a cohort study of 321 individuals from 258 kindreds suspected of being FPC and undergoing secondary screening for PDAC through the European Registry of Hereditary Pancreatitis and Familial Pancreatic Cancer (EUROPAC). Computerised tomography, endoscopic ultrasound of the pancreas and magnetic resonance imaging were used. The risk of being a carrier of a dominant mutation predisposing to pancreatic cancer was stratified into three even categories (low, medium and high) based on: Mendelian probability, the number of PDAC cases and the number of people at risk in a kindred. RESULTS: There was a median (interquartile range (IQR)) follow-up of 2 (0-5) years and a median (IQR) number of investigations per participant of 4 (2-6). One PDAC, two low-grade neuroendocrine tumours and 41 cystic lesions were identified, including 23 IPMN (22 branch-duct (BD)). The PDAC case occurred in the top 10% of risk, and the BD-IPMN cases were evenly distributed amongst risk categories: low (6/107), medium (10/107) and high (6/107) (P = 0.63). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of finding BD-IPMN was independent of genetic predisposition and so they should be managed according to guidelines for incidental finding of IPMN.

7 Article Role of Radiological Imaging in the Diagnosis and Characterization of Pancreatic Cystic Lesions: A Systematic Review. 2018

Mohamed, Eyas / Jackson, Richard / Halloran, Christopher M / Ghaneh, Paula. ·From the Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine and. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool Cancer Research UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #30199486.

ABSTRACT: The evidence on the ability of radiological tests to predict a specific diagnosis and also their aptitude in identifying pathological markers indicative of malignancy in cystic lesions of the pancreas remains inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review on MEDLINE for the use of computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/CT (PET/CT) in the diagnosis and characterization of these cysts. The accuracy of CT scan for reaching a specific diagnosis was 39% to 61.4%, whereas its accuracy for differentiating benign from malignant lesions was 61.9% to 80%. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a better accuracy in identifying a specific diagnosis of 50% to 86%, whereas its accuracy in differentiating benign from malignant lesions was 55.6% to 87%. The use of magnetic resonance imaging was superior to CT scan in identifying septations, mural nodules, and ductal communication. The sensitivity of PET/CT in diagnosing malignancy was 85.7% to 100% with a reported accuracy of 88% to 95%. The evidence gathered from this review suggests that the adequacy of CT imaging in full characterization of pancreatic cysts is suboptimal, and therefore a low threshold for supplementary imaging is advised. The use of PET/CT should be considered in high-risk patients with equivocal findings.

8 Article Immune Cell and Stromal Signature Associated With Progression-Free Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma. 2018

Mahajan, Ujjwal Mukund / Langhoff, Eno / Goni, Elisabetta / Costello, Eithne / Greenhalf, William / Halloran, Christopher / Ormanns, Steffen / Kruger, Stephan / Boeck, Stefan / Ribback, Silvia / Beyer, Georg / Dombroswki, Frank / Weiss, Frank-Ulrich / Neoptolemos, John P / Werner, Jens / D'Haese, Jan G / Bazhin, Alexandr / Peterhansl, Julian / Pichlmeier, Svenja / Büchler, Markus W / Kleeff, Jörg / Ganeh, Paula / Sendler, Matthias / Palmer, Daniel H / Kohlmann, Thomas / Rad, Roland / Regel, Ivonne / Lerch, Markus M / Mayerle, Julia. ·Department of Medicine II, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany; Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany. · Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Institute of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, LMU Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Medicine III, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany. · Department of Pathology, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral, and Transplant Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Visceral, Vascular and Endocrine Surgery, Martin-Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle, Germany. · Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK; Clatterbridge Cancer Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Wirral, UK. · Department of Community Medicine, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Center for Translational Cancer Research (TranslaTUM), Technische Universität München, Munich, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Germany; Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. Electronic address: julia.mayerle@med.uni-muenchen.de. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #30092175.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Changes to the microenvironment of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) have been associated with poor outcomes of patients. We studied the associations between composition of the pancreatic stroma (fibrogenic, inert, dormant, or fibrolytic stroma) and infiltration by inflammatory cells and times of progression-free survival (PFS) of patients with PDACs after resection. METHODS: We obtained 1824 tissue microarray specimens from 385 patients included in the European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer trial 1 and 3 and performed immunohistochemistry to detect alpha smooth muscle actin, type 1 collagen, CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, CD206, and neutrophils. Tumors that expressed high and low levels of these markers were compared with patient outcomes using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariable recursive partitioning for discrete-time survival tree analysis. Prognostic index was delineated by a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model of immune cell and stromal markers and PFS. Findings were validated using 279 tissue microarray specimens from 93 patients in a separate cohort. RESULTS: Levels of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD68, and CD206 were independently associated with tumor recurrence. Recursive partitioning for discrete-time survival tree analysis identified a high level of CD3 as the strongest independent predictor for longer PFS. Tumors with levels of CD3 and high levels of CD206 associated with a median PFS time of 16.6 months and a median prognostic index of -0.32 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.35 to -0.31), whereas tumors with low level of CD3 cell and low level of CD8 and high level of CD68 associated with a median PFS time of 7.9 months and a prognostic index of 0.32 (95% CI 0.050-0.32); we called these patterns histologic signatures. Stroma composition, when unassociated with inflammatory cell markers, did not associate significantly with PFS. In the validation cohort, the histologic signature resulted in an error matrix accuracy of predicted response of 0.75 (95% CI 0.64-0.83; accuracy P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: In an analysis of PDAC tissue microarray specimens, we identified and validated a histologic signature, based on leukocyte and stromal factors, that associates with PFS times of patients with resected PDACs. Immune cells might affect the composition of the pancreatic stroma to affect progression of PDAC. These findings provide new insights into the immune response to PDAC.

9 Article Intratumoural expression of deoxycytidylate deaminase or ribonuceotide reductase subunit M1 expression are not related to survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer given adjuvant chemotherapy. 2018

Elander, N O / Aughton, K / Ghaneh, P / Neoptolemos, J P / Palmer, D H / Cox, T F / Campbell, F / Costello, E / Halloran, C M / Mackey, J R / Scarfe, A G / Valle, J W / McDonald, A C / Carter, R / Tebbutt, N C / Goldstein, D / Shannon, J / Dervenis, C / Glimelius, B / Deakin, M / Charnley, R M / Anthoney, A / Lerch, M M / Mayerle, J / Oláh, A / Büchler, M W / Greenhalf, W / Anonymous1351258. ·Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Prince of Wales hospital and Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Nepean Cancer Centre and University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · The Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · University Hospital, North Staffordshire, Staffordshire, UK. · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany. · The Petz Aladar Hospital, Gyor, Hungary. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. greenhaf@liv.ac.uk. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #29523831.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deoxycytidylate deaminase (DCTD) and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1) are potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers for pyrimidine-based chemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of DCTD and RRM1 was performed on tissue microarrays representing tumour samples from 303 patients in European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC)-randomised adjuvant trials following pancreatic resection, 272 of whom had received gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil with folinic acid in ESPAC-3(v2), and 31 patients from the combined ESPAC-3(v1) and ESPAC-1 post-operative pure observational groups. RESULTS: Neither log-rank testing on dichotomised strata or Cox proportional hazard regression showed any relationship of DCTD or RRM1 expression levels to survival overall or by treatment group. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of either DCTD or RRM1 was not prognostic or predictive in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who had had post-operative chemotherapy with either gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil with folinic acid.

10 Article Expression of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and hENT1 predicts survival in pancreatic cancer. 2018

Elander, N O / Aughton, K / Ghaneh, P / Neoptolemos, J P / Palmer, D H / Cox, T F / Campbell, F / Costello, E / Halloran, C M / Mackey, J R / Scarfe, A G / Valle, J W / McDonald, A C / Carter, R / Tebbutt, N C / Goldstein, D / Shannon, J / Dervenis, C / Glimelius, B / Deakin, M / Charnley, R M / Anthoney, Alan / Lerch, M M / Mayerle, J / Oláh, A / Büchler, M W / Greenhalf, W / Anonymous1151214. ·From the Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · The Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. · Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. · Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia. · Prince of Wales hospital and Clinical School University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia. · Nepean Cancer Centre and University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · The Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · University Hospital, North Staffordshire, UK. · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. · The Petz Aladar Hospital, Gyor, Hungary. · From the Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. greenhaf@liv.ac.uk. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #29515256.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) tumour expression may provide added value to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) tumour expression in predicting survival following pyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: DPD and hENT1 immunohistochemistry and scoring was completed on tumour cores from 238 patients with pancreatic cancer in the ESPAC-3(v2) trial, randomised to either postoperative gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (5FU/FA). RESULTS: DPD tumour expression was associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio, HR = 1.73 [95% confidence interval, CI = 1.21-2.49], p = 0.003). This was significant in the 5FU/FA arm (HR = 2.07 [95% CI = 1.22-3.53], p = 0.007), but not in the gemcitabine arm (HR = 1.47 [0.91-3.37], p = 0.119). High hENT1 tumour expression was associated with increased survival in gemcitabine treated (HR = 0.56 [0.38-0.82], p = 0.003) but not in 5FU/FA treated patients (HR = 1.19 [0.80-1.78], p = 0.390). In patients with low hENT1 tumour expression, high DPD tumour expression was associated with a worse median [95% CI] survival in the 5FU/FA arm (9.7 [5.3-30.4] vs 29.2 [19.5-41.9] months, p = 0.002) but not in the gemcitabine arm (14.0 [9.1-15.7] vs. 18.0 [7.6-15.3] months, p = 1.000). The interaction of treatment arm and DPD expression was not significant (p = 0.303), but the interaction of treatment arm and hENT1 expression was (p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: DPD tumour expression was a negative prognostic biomarker. Together with tumour expression of hENT1, DPD tumour expression defined patient subgroups that might benefit from either postoperative 5FU/FA or gemcitabine.

11 Article PET-PANC: multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy and health economic analysis study of the impact of combined modality 18fluorine-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography with computed tomography scanning in the diagnosis and management of pancreatic cancer. 2018

Ghaneh, Paula / Hanson, Robert / Titman, Andrew / Lancaster, Gill / Plumpton, Catrin / Lloyd-Williams, Huw / Yeo, Seow Tien / Edwards, Rhiannon Tudor / Johnson, Colin / Abu Hilal, Mohammed / Higginson, Antony P / Armstrong, Tom / Smith, Andrew / Scarsbrook, Andrew / McKay, Colin / Carter, Ross / Sutcliffe, Robert P / Bramhall, Simon / Kocher, Hemant M / Cunningham, David / Pereira, Stephen P / Davidson, Brian / Chang, David / Khan, Saboor / Zealley, Ian / Sarker, Debashis / Al Sarireh, Bilal / Charnley, Richard / Lobo, Dileep / Nicolson, Marianne / Halloran, Christopher / Raraty, Michael / Sutton, Robert / Vinjamuri, Sobhan / Evans, Jonathan / Campbell, Fiona / Deeks, Jon / Sanghera, Bal / Wong, Wai-Lup / Neoptolemos, John P. ·Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK. · Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Bangor University, Bangor, UK. · Faculty of Medicine, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, Southampton, UK. · Department of Radiology, Portsmouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Portsmouth, UK. · Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Department of Radiology, Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Leeds, UK. · Department of Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde, Glasgow, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK. · Department of General Surgery, Wye Valley NHS Trust, Hereford, UK. · Barts Cancer Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, London, UK. · Gastrointestinal and Lymphoma Unit, Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Institute for Liver and Digestive Health, University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Blackburn Hospital, East Lancashire Hospitals NHS Trust, Blackburn, UK. · Department of Surgery, University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK. · Department of Surgery, Ninewells Hospital and Medical School, NHS Tayside, Dundee, UK. · Department of Oncology, King's College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Department of Surgery, Morriston Hospital, Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, Swansea, UK. · Department of Surgery, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK. · Department of Oncology, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen, UK. · Department of Surgery, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Nuclear Medicine, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Radiology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Pathology, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. · Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK. · Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, Mount Vernon Hospital, Middlesex, UK. ·Health Technol Assess · Pubmed #29402376.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer diagnosis and staging can be difficult in 10-20% of patients. Positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) adds precise anatomical localisation to functional data. The use of PET/CT may add further value to the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer. OBJECTIVE: To determine the incremental diagnostic accuracy and impact of PET/CT in addition to standard diagnostic work-up in patients with suspected pancreatic cancer. DESIGN: A multicentre prospective diagnostic accuracy and clinical value study of PET/CT in suspected pancreatic malignancy. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with suspected pancreatic malignancy. INTERVENTIONS: All patients to undergo PET/CT following standard diagnostic work-up. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in addition to standard diagnostic work-up with multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Secondary outcomes were (1) changes in patients' diagnosis, staging and management as a result of PET/CT; (2) changes in the costs and effectiveness of patient management as a result of PET/CT; (3) the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in chronic pancreatitis; (4) the identification of groups of patients who would benefit most from PET/CT; and (5) the incremental diagnostic value of PET/CT in other pancreatic tumours. RESULTS: Between 2011 and 2013, 589 patients with suspected pancreatic cancer underwent MDCT and PET/CT, with 550 patients having complete data and in-range PET/CT. Sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer were 88.5% and 70.6%, respectively, for MDCT and 92.7% and 75.8%, respectively, for PET/CT. The maximum standardised uptake value (SUV CONCLUSION: PET/CT provided a significant incremental diagnostic benefit in the diagnosis of pancreatic cancer and significantly influenced the staging and management of patients. PET/CT had limited utility in chronic pancreatitis and other pancreatic tumours. PET/CT is likely to be cost-effective at current reimbursement rates for PET/CT to the UK NHS. This was not a randomised controlled trial and therefore we do not have any information from patients who would have undergone MDCT only for comparison. In addition, there were issues in estimating costs for PET/CT. Future work should evaluate the role of PET/CT in intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and prognosis and response to therapy in patients with pancreatic cancer. STUDY REGISTRATION: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN73852054 and UKCRN 8166. FUNDING: The National Institute for Health Research Health Technology Assessment programme.

12 Article The impact of diabetes mellitus on survival following resection and adjuvant chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer. 2016

Kleeff, Jörg / Costello, Eithne / Jackson, Richard / Halloran, Chris / Greenhalf, William / Ghaneh, Paula / Lamb, Richard F / Lerch, Markus M / Mayerle, Julia / Palmer, Daniel / Cox, Trevor / Rawcliffe, Charlotte L / Strobel, Oliver / Büchler, Markus W / Neoptolemos, John P. ·Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool Cancer Research UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · NIHR Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK. · Department of Medicine A, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #27584663.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is frequently observed in pancreatic cancer patients and is both a risk factor and an early manifestation of the disease. METHODS: We analysed the prognostic impact of diabetes on the outcome of pancreatic cancer following resection and adjuvant chemotherapy using individual patient data from three European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer randomised controlled trials. Analyses were carried out to assess the association between clinical characteristics and the presence of preoperative diabetes, as well as the effect of diabetic status on overall survival. RESULTS: In total, 1105 patients were included in the analysis, of whom 257 (23%) had confirmed diabetes and 848 (77%) did not. Median (95% confidence interval (CI)) unadjusted overall survival in non-diabetic patients was 22.3 (20.8-24.1) months compared with 18.8 (16.9-22.1) months for diabetic patients (P=0.24). Diabetic patients were older, had increased weight and more co-morbidities. Following adjustment, multivariable analysis demonstrated that diabetic patients had an increased risk of death (hazard ratio: 1.19 (95% CI 1.01, 1.40), P=0.034). Maximum tumour size of diabetic patients was larger at randomisation (33.6 vs 29.7 mm, P=0.026). CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes mellitus was associated with increased tumour size and reduced survival following pancreatic cancer resection and adjuvant chemotherapy.

13 Article Association of genetic polymorphisms with survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients. 2016

Rizzato, Cosmeri / Campa, Daniele / Talar-Wojnarowska, Renata / Halloran, Christopher / Kupcinskas, Juozas / Butturini, Giovanni / Mohelníková-Duchoňová, Beatrice / Sperti, Cosimo / Tjaden, Christine / Ghaneh, Paula / Hackert, Thilo / Funel, Niccola / Giese, Nathalia / Tavano, Francesca / Pezzilli, Raffaele / Pedata, Mariangela / Pasquali, Claudio / Gazouli, Maria / Mambrini, Andrea / Souček, Pavel / di Sebastiano, Pierluigi / Capurso, Gabriele / Cantore, Maurizio / Oliverius, Martin / Offringa, Rienk / Małecka-Panas, Ewa / Strobel, Oliver / Scarpa, Aldo / Canzian, Federico. ·Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, Department of Biology, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Digestive Tract Diseases, Medical University of Łódź, Łódź, Poland. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Department of Gastroenterology, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences, Kaunas, Lithuania. · Unit of Surgery B, The Pancreas Institute, Department of Surgery and Oncology, G.B. Rossi Hospital, University of Verona Hospital Trust, Verona, Italy. · Department of Oncology, Palacky University Medical School and Teaching Hospital, Olomouc, Czech Republic. · Department of Surgery, Gastroenterology and Oncology, University of Padua, Padua, Italy. · Department of General, Visceral and Transplantation Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery and. · Division of Gastroenterology and Research Laboratory, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", S. Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Pancreas Unit, Department of Digestive Disease, Sant'Orsola-Malpighi Hospital, Bologna, Italy. · Oncological Department, ASL 1 Massa Carrara, Massa Carrara, Italy. · Department of Basic Medical Science, Laboratory of Biology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens, Greece. · Department of Surgery, IRCCS Scientific Institute and Regional General Hospital "Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza", San Giovanni Rotondo (FG), Italy. · Digestive and Liver Disease Unit, 'Sapienza' University of Rome, Rome, Italy. · Transplant Surgery Department, Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague, Czech Republic. · Division of Molecular Oncology of Gastrointestinal Tumors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany and. · ARC-NET, Centre for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Genomic Epidemiology Group, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg, Germany, f.canzian@dkfz.de. ·Carcinogenesis · Pubmed #27497070.

ABSTRACT: Germline genetic variability might contribute, at least partially, to the survival of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. Two recently performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) on PDAC overall survival (OS) suggested (P < 10(-5)) the association between 30 genomic regions and PDAC OS. With the aim to highlight the true associations within these regions, we analyzed 44 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 30 candidate regions in 1722 PDAC patients within the PANcreatic Disease ReseArch (PANDoRA) consortium. We observed statistically significant associations for five of the selected regions. One association in the CTNNA2 gene on chromosome 2p12 [rs1567532, hazard ratio (HR) = 1.75, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19-2.58, P = 0.005 for homozygotes for the minor allele] and one in the last intron of the RUNX2 gene on chromosome 6p21 (rs12209785, HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.80-0.98, P = 0.014 for heterozygotes) are of particular relevance. These loci do not coincide with those that showed the strongest associations in the previous GWAS. In silico analysis strongly suggested a possible mechanistic link between these two SNPs and pancreatic cancer survival. Functional studies are warranted to confirm the link between these genes (or other genes mapping in those regions) and PDAC prognosis in order to understand whether these variants may have the potential to impact treatment decisions and design of clinical trials.

14 Article Management and Outcome of 64 Patients with Pancreatic Serous Cystic Neoplasms. 2016

Gomatos, Ilias P / Halloran, Christopher / Ghaneh, Paula / Raraty, Michael / Polydoros, Fotis / Campbell, Fiona / Evans, Jonathan / Sutton, Robert / Garry, Jo / Whelan, Philip / Neoptolemos, John P. ·National Institutes of Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit and Clinical Directorate of General Surgery, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. ·Dig Surg · Pubmed #26918360.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The optimal management approach to pancreatic serous cystic neoplasms (SCNs) is still evolving. METHODS: Consecutive patients with SCN managed at the Liverpool Pancreas Cancer Centre between 2000 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. RESULTS: There were 64 patients consisting of 39 women (60.9%) and 25 men (39.1%). Forty-seven patients (73.4%) had surgical removal and 17 (26.6%) were observed. The possibility of a non-SCN malignancy was the predominant indication for resection in 27 (57.4%) patients. Postoperative morbidity occurred in 26 (55.3%) patients with 2 (4.3%) deaths. An increased risk of resection was associated with patient's age (p = 0.011), diagnosis before 2009 (p < 0.001), pain (p = 0.043), possibility of cancer (p = 0.009) and a solid SCN component on imaging (p = 0.002). Independent factors associated with resection were a diagnosis before 2009 (p = 0.005) and a solid SCN component (p < 0.001). Independent factors associated with shorter time to surgical resection were persistent pain (p = 0.003) and a solid SCN component (p = 0.007). CONCLUSION: There was a reduction in the proportion of resections with the application of an observe-only policy for asymptomatic patients with more definite features of SCN. Improved criteria are still required in the remainder of patients with uncertain features of SCN in deciding for intervention or surveillance.

15 Article What Is the Best Way to Identify Malignant Transformation Within Pancreatic IPMN: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses. 2015

Sultana, Asma / Jackson, Richard / Tim, Gilbert / Bostock, Emma / Psarelli, Eftychia E / Cox, Trevor F / Sutton, Robert / Ghaneh, Paula / Raraty, Michael G T / Neoptolemos, John P / Halloran, Christopher M. ·NIHR Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, Institute of Translational Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Medical Statistics, CRUK Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. ·Clin Transl Gastroenterol · Pubmed #26658837.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasias (IPMNs) represent 25% of all cystic neoplasms and are precursor lesions for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. This study aims to identify the best imaging modality for detecting malignant transformation in IPMN, the sensitivity and specificity of risk features on imaging, and the usefulness of tumor markers in serum and cyst fluid to predict malignancy in IPMN. METHODS: Databases were searched from November 2006 to March 2014. Pooled sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic techniques/imaging features of suspected malignancy in IPMN using a hierarchical summary receiver operator characteristic (HSROC) approach were performed. RESULTS: A total of 467 eligible studies were identified, of which 51 studies met the inclusion criteria and 37 of these were incorporated into meta-analyses. The pooled sensitivity and specificity for risk features predictive of malignancy on computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging were 0.809 and 0.762 respectively, and on positron emission tomography were 0.968 and 0.911. Mural nodule, cyst size, and main pancreatic duct dilation found on imaging had pooled sensitivity for prediction of malignancy of 0.690, 0.682, and 0.614, respectively, and specificity of 0.798, 0.574, and 0.687. Raised serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA19-9) levels yielded sensitivity of 0.380 and specificity of 0903. Combining parameters yielded a sensitivity of 0.743 and specificity of 0.906. CONCLUSIONS: PET holds the most promise in identifying malignant transformation within an IPMN. Combining parameters increases sensitivity and specificity; the presence of mural nodule on imaging was the most sensitive whereas raised serum CA19-9 (>37 KU/l) was the most specific feature predictive of malignancy in IPMNs.

16 Article Incidence of post-ERCP pancreatitis from direct pancreatic juice collection in hereditary pancreatitis and familial pancreatic cancer before and after the introduction of prophylactic pancreatic stents and rectal diclofenac. 2015

Nicholson, James A / Greenhalf, William / Jackson, Richard / Cox, Trevor F / Butler, Jane V / Hanna, Thomas / Harrison, Sara / Grocock, Christopher J / Halloran, Christopher M / Howes, Nathan R / Raraty, Michael G / Ghaneh, Paula / Johnstone, Marianne / Sarkar, Sanchoy / Smart, Howard L / Evans, Jonathan C / Aithal, Guruprasad P / Sutton, Robert / Neoptolemos, John P / Lombard, Martin G. ·From the *National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital; †Liverpool Clinical Trials Unit; Departments of ‡Gastroenterology, and §Radiology, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool; and ║Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, National Institute for Health Research Nottingham, Queen's Medical Centre, Nottingham, United Kingdom. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25438071.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Individuals from hereditary pancreatitis (HP) and familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) kindreds are at increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. Premalignant molecular changes may be detected in pancreatic juice collected by endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). The objective was to determine the risk of post-ERCP pancreatitis (PEP). METHODS: A prospective study (1999-2013) was undertaken of 80 ERCPs (24 in HP and 56 in FPC) from 60 individuals and the impact of PEP prophylaxis using a self-expelling pancreatic stent and 50 mg diclofenac per rectum from 2008. RESULTS: There was no PEP in the HP cohort and 13 (23.2%) PEP from 56 procedures in the FPC cohort (P = 0.0077). Up to 2008 PEP had occurred in 7 (43.8%) of 16 procedures in FPC individuals versus none of 18 procedures in HP individuals (P = 0.0021). After the introduction of prophylaxis, the incidence of PEP fell to 6 (15.0%) of 40 procedures in FPC individuals (P = 0.0347).The odds ratio (95% confidence interval) was 0.23 (0.06-0.84) in favor of prophylaxis (0.035). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with HP are at minimal risk for PEP. Although the risk of PEP in individuals with FPC can be reduced by using prophylactic self-expelling stents and diclofenac, it remains too high for routine screening.

17 Article Biomarkers for early diagnosis of pancreatic cancer. 2015

Jenkinson, Claire / Earl, Julie / Ghaneh, Paula / Halloran, Christopher / Carrato, Alfredo / Greenhalf, William / Neoptolemos, John / Costello, Eithne. ·Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, National Institute for Health Research Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, University of Liverpool, Daulby Street, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK. ·Expert Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol · Pubmed #25373768.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma is an aggressive malignancy with a 5-year survival rate of approximately 5%. The lack of established strategies for early detection contributes to this poor prognosis. Although several novel candidate biomarkers have been proposed for earlier diagnosis, none have been adopted into routine clinical use. In this review, the authors examine the challenges associated with finding new pancreatic cancer diagnostic biomarkers and explore why translation of biomarker research for patient benefit has thus far failed. The authors also review recent progress and highlight advances in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer that may lead to improvements in biomarker detection and implementation.

18 Article Serum cytokine biomarker panels for discriminating pancreatic cancer from benign pancreatic disease. 2014

Shaw, Victoria E / Lane, Brian / Jenkinson, Claire / Cox, Trevor / Greenhalf, William / Halloran, Christopher M / Tang, Joseph / Sutton, Robert / Neoptolemos, John P / Costello, Eithne. ·NIHR Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GA, UK. ecostell@liverpool.ac.uk. ·Mol Cancer · Pubmed #24884871.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: We investigated whether combinations of serum cytokines, used with logistic disease predictor models, could facilitate the detection of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: The serum levels of 27 cytokines were measured in 241 subjects, 127 with PDAC, 49 with chronic pancreatitis, 20 with benign biliary obstruction and 45 healthy controls. Samples were split randomly into independent training and test sets. Cytokine biomarker panels were selected by identifying the top performing cytokines in best fit logistic regression models during multiple rounds of resampling from the training dataset. Disease prediction by logistic models, built using the resulting cytokine panels, was evaluated with training and test sets and further examined using resampled performance evaluation. RESULTS: For the discrimination of PDAC patients from patients with benign disease, a panel of IP-10, IL-6, PDGF plus CA19-9 offered improved diagnostic performance over CA19-9 alone in the training (AUC 0.838 vs. 0.678) and independent test set (AUC 0.884 vs. 0.798). For the discrimination of PDAC from CP, a panel of IL-8, CA19-9, IL-6 and IP-10 offered improved diagnostic performance over CA19-9 alone with the training (AUC 0.880 vs. 0.758) and test set (AUC 0.912 vs. 0.848). Finally, for the discrimination of PDAC in the presence of jaundice from benign controls with jaundice, a panel of IP-10, IL-8, IL-1b and PDGF demonstrated improvement over CA19-9 in the training (AUC 0.810 vs. 0.614) and test set (AUC 0.857 vs. 0.659). CONCLUSIONS: These findings support the potential role for cytokine panels in the discrimination of PDAC from patients with benign pancreatic diseases and warrant additional study.

19 Article Pancreatic cancer hENT1 expression and survival from gemcitabine in patients from the ESPAC-3 trial. 2014

Greenhalf, William / Ghaneh, Paula / Neoptolemos, John P / Palmer, Daniel H / Cox, Trevor F / Lamb, Richard F / Garner, Elizabeth / Campbell, Fiona / Mackey, John R / Costello, Eithne / Moore, Malcolm J / Valle, Juan W / McDonald, Alexander C / Carter, Ross / Tebbutt, Niall C / Goldstein, David / Shannon, Jennifer / Dervenis, Christos / Glimelius, Bengt / Deakin, Mark / Charnley, Richard M / Lacaine, François / Scarfe, Andrew G / Middleton, Mark R / Anthoney, Alan / Halloran, Christopher M / Mayerle, Julia / Oláh, Attila / Jackson, Richard / Rawcliffe, Charlotte L / Scarpa, Aldo / Bassi, Claudio / Büchler, Markus W / Anonymous5150777. ·Affiliations of authors: Liverpool Cancer Research UK Cancer Trials Unit, Liverpool Cancer Research UK Centre, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK (WG, JPN, EG, TFC, PG, EC, CMH, CLR, FC, RJ) · the Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Canada (MJM) · Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, School of Cancer and Enabling Sciences, University of Manchester, UK (JWV) · Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK (DHP) · Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK (ACM) · Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK (RC) · Hôpital Tenon, Université, Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France (FL) · Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia (NCT) · Prince of Wales Hospital and Clinical School University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia (DG) · Nepean Cancer Centre and University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia (JS) · Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece (CD) · Medical Oncology, Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington, Merseyside, UK (DS) · Department of Oncology, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden (BG) · University Hospital, North Staffordshire, UK (MD) · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK (RMC) · Service de Chirurgie Digestive et Viscérale, Hôpital Tenon, Paris, France (FL) · Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada (JRM, AGS) · Churchill Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust, Oxford, UK (MRM) · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK (AA) · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany (JM) · Petz Aladar Hospital, Gyor, Hungary (AO) · Departments of Surgery and Pathology and ARC-NET Research Center, University of Verona, Italy (AS, CB) · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany (MWB). ·J Natl Cancer Inst · Pubmed #24301456.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (hENT1) levels in pancreatic adenocarcinoma may predict survival in patients who receive adjuvant gemcitabine after resection. METHODS: Microarrays from 434 patients randomized to chemotherapy in the ESPAC-3 trial (plus controls from ESPAC-1/3) were stained with the 10D7G2 anti-hENT1 antibody. Patients were classified as having high hENT1 expression if the mean H score for their cores was above the overall median H score (48). High and low hENT1-expressing groups were compared using Kaplan-Meier curves, log-rank tests, and Cox proportional hazards models. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS: Three hundred eighty patients (87.6%) and 1808 cores were suitable and included in the final analysis. Median overall survival for gemcitabine-treated patients (n = 176) was 23.4 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 18.3 to 26.0) months vs 23.5 (95% CI = 19.8 to 27.3) months for 176 patients treated with 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (χ(2) 1=0.24; P = .62). Median survival for patients treated with gemcitabine was 17.1 (95% CI = 14.3 to 23.8) months for those with low hENT1 expression vs 26.2 (95% CI = 21.2 to 31.4) months for those with high hENT1 expression (χ(2)₁= 9.87; P = .002). For the 5-fluorouracil group, median survival was 25.6 (95% CI = 20.1 to 27.9) and 21.9 (95% CI = 16.0 to 28.3) months for those with low and high hENT1 expression, respectively (χ(2)₁ = 0.83; P = .36). hENT1 levels were not predictive of survival for the 28 patients of the observation group (χ(2)₁ = 0.37; P = .54). Multivariable analysis confirmed hENT1 expression as a predictive marker in gemcitabine-treated (Wald χ(2) = 9.16; P = .003) but not 5-fluorouracil-treated (Wald χ(2) = 1.22; P = .27) patients. CONCLUSIONS: Subject to prospective validation, gemcitabine should not be used for patients with low tumor hENT1 expression.

20 Article Partial pancreatic resection for pancreatic malignancy is associated with sustained pancreatic exocrine failure and reduced quality of life: a prospective study. 2011

Halloran, Christopher M / Cox, Trevor F / Chauhan, Seema / Raraty, Michael G T / Sutton, Robert / Neoptolemos, John P / Ghaneh, Paula. ·Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, and National Institute for Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool, UK. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #22094930.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Pancreatic resection for cancer may produce pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (PEI), which is poorly understood. This study examined the coefficient of fat absorption (CFA), symptoms, quality of life (QoL) and the accuracy of faecal elastase-1 (FE-1) measurement to predict PEI. METHODS: Forty patients were analysed following resection for pancreatic malignancy. The primary endpoint was PEI diagnosis defined by CFA <93%; secondary endpoints were PEI diagnosis using FE-1 <200 μg/g, body mass index (BMI), and symptom and QoL analysis. Interventions were 3-day stool collection, EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 1) questionnaire and patient's diary, at 6 weeks and 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. RESULTS: CFA <93% was present in 67% of patients at 6 weeks and in 55% at 12 months. PEI using FE-1 was present in 77 and 83% of patients, respectively. No significant changes between time-points were observed. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy for FE-1 in detecting CFA <93% were 91, 35, 70, 71 and 70%, respectively. CFA and FE-1 levels were uncorrelated. Overall, QoL increased at 6 (p = 0.0212) and 12 (p < 0.0001) months after surgery, mainly driven by physical, role and social functioning, and by appetite. Importantly, however, BMI and symptoms were unaffected by PEI, which suggests a subclinical presentation; such patients had attributes indicating poorer QoL (notably insomnia, p = 0.0012). CONCLUSIONS: PEI was common and sustained following resection and not associated with significant symptoms. These patients had a tendency toward poorer QoL. FE-1 is a poor surrogate for diagnosing impaired fat absorption. Postoperative pancreatic enzyme replacement should be considered more routinely. and IAP.

21 Minor Pancreatic Cancer and FOLFIRINOX: Should We Resect All Responders? 2018

Neoptolemos, John P / Halloran, Christopher M / Ghaneh, Paula / Kleeff, Jorg. ·NIHR Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, University of Liverpool, Royal Liverpool and Broadgreen University Hospitals NHS Trust, Liverpool, UK. ·Ann Surg · Pubmed #29300711.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

22 Minor Beyond ESPAC-4: better surgery and systemic therapy. 2017

Psarelli, Eftychia E / Jackson, Richard / Neoptolemos, John P / Palmer, Daniel H / Ghaneh, Paula / Halloran, Christopher M / Büchler, Markus W. ·Liverpool Clinical and Cancer Research UK Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GL, UK. · Liverpool Clinical and Cancer Research UK Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GL, UK; Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. Electronic address: j.p.neoptolemos@liverpool.ac.uk. · Liverpool Clinical and Cancer Research UK Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GL, UK; Clatterbridge Cancer Centre, Wirral, UK. · Liverpool Clinical and Cancer Research UK Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GL, UK; Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Department of General, Abdominal and Transplant Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. ·Lancet · Pubmed #28422026.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --