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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Anita Hall
Based on 3 articles published since 2009
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Anita Hall wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Expression of DRD2 Is Increased in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma and Inhibitors Slow Tumor Growth in Mice. 2016

Jandaghi, Pouria / Najafabadi, Hamed S / Bauer, Andrea S / Papadakis, Andreas I / Fassan, Matteo / Hall, Anita / Monast, Anie / von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus / Neoptolemos, John P / Costello, Eithne / Greenhalf, William / Scarpa, Aldo / Sipos, Bence / Auld, Daniel / Lathrop, Mark / Park, Morag / Büchler, Markus W / Strobel, Oliver / Hackert, Thilo / Giese, Nathalia A / Zogopoulos, George / Sangwan, Veena / Huang, Sidong / Riazalhosseini, Yasser / Hoheisel, Jörg D. ·Functional Genome Analysis, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Functional Genome Analysis, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy. · Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Applied Tumor Biology, Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · National Institute for Health Research, Liverpool Pancreas Biomedical Research Unit, Liverpool, UK. · ARC-NET Center for Applied Research on Cancer, University and Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy; Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, Università di Verona, Verona, Italy. · Institute for Pathology and Neuropathology, Universitätsklinikum Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany. · Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Pathology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada. · Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Electronic address: Yasser.riazalhosseini@mcgill.ca. ·Gastroenterology · Pubmed #27578530.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND & AIMS: Incidence of and mortality from pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), the most common form of pancreatic cancer, are almost equivalent, so better treatments are needed. We studied gene expression profiles of PDACs and the functions of genes with altered expression to identify new therapeutic targets. METHODS: We performed microarray analysis to analyze gene expression profiles of 195 PDAC and 41 non-tumor pancreatic tissue samples. We undertook an extensive analysis of the PDAC transcriptome by superimposing interaction networks of proteins encoded by aberrantly expressed genes over signaling pathways associated with PDAC development to identify factors that might alter regulation of these pathways during tumor progression. We performed tissue microarray analysis to verify changes in expression of candidate protein using an independent set of 152 samples (40 nontumor pancreatic tissues, 63 PDAC sections, and 49 chronic pancreatitis samples). We validated the functional relevance of the candidate molecule using RNA interference or pharmacologic inhibitors in pancreatic cancer cell lines and analyses of xenograft tumors in mice. RESULTS: In an analysis of 38,276 human genes and loci, we identified 1676 genes that were significantly up-regulated and 1166 genes that were significantly down-regulated in PDAC compared with nontumor pancreatic tissues. One gene that was up-regulated and associated with multiple signaling pathways that are dysregulated in PDAC was G protein subunit αi2, which has not been previously associated with PDAC. G protein subunit αi2 mediates the effects of dopamine receptor D2 (DRD2) on cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling; PDAC tissues had a slight but significant increase in DRD2 messenger RNA. Levels of DRD2 protein were substantially increased in PDACs, compared with non-tumor tissues, in tissue microarray analyses. RNA interference knockdown of DRD2 or inhibition with pharmacologic antagonists (pimozide and haloperidol) reduced proliferation of pancreatic cancer cells, induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis, and reduced cell migration. RNA interference knockdown of DRD2 in pancreatic tumor cells reduced growth of xenograft tumors in mice, and administration of the DRD2 inhibitor haloperidol to mice with orthotopic xenograft tumors reduced final tumor size and metastasis. CONCLUSIONS: In gene expression profile analysis of PDAC samples, we found the DRD2 signaling pathway to be activated. Inhibition of DRD2 in pancreatic cancer cells reduced proliferation and migration, and slowed growth of xenograft tumors in mice. DRD2 antagonists routinely used for management of schizophrenia might be tested in patients with pancreatic cancer.

2 Article Candidate DNA repair susceptibility genes identified by exome sequencing in high-risk pancreatic cancer. 2016

Smith, Alyssa L / Alirezaie, Najmeh / Connor, Ashton / Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle / Grant, Robert / Selander, Iris / Bascuñana, Claire / Borgida, Ayelet / Hall, Anita / Whelan, Thomas / Holter, Spring / McPherson, Treasa / Cleary, Sean / Petersen, Gloria M / Omeroglu, Atilla / Saloustros, Emmanouil / McPherson, John / Stein, Lincoln D / Foulkes, William D / Majewski, Jacek / Gallinger, Steven / Zogopoulos, George. ·Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3J1; Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3. · McGill University and Genome Quebec Innovation Centre, 740 Dr. Penfield Avenue, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 0G1. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5; MaRS Centre, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, 661 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 0A3. · MaRS Centre, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, 661 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 0A3. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5; Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3H7. · Department of Health Sciences Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. · Department of Pathology, McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3J1. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hereditary Cancer Clinic, University Hospital of Heraklion, Voutes, Heraklion 71110, Greece. · Program in Cancer Genetics, Departments of Oncology and Human Genetics, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E2. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X5; MaRS Centre, Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, 661 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 0A3; Zane Cohen Centre for Digestive Diseases, Mount Sinai Hospital, 60 Murray Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5T 3H7. Electronic address: steven.gallinger@uhn.ca. · Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Décarie Boulevard, Montreal, QC, Canada H4A 3J1; Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Avenue West, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 1A3; Program in Cancer Genetics, Departments of Oncology and Human Genetics, Sir Mortimer B. Davis-Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, 3755 Côte-Ste-Catherine Road, Montreal, QC, Canada H3T 1E2. Electronic address: george.zogopoulos@mcgill.ca. ·Cancer Lett · Pubmed #26546047.

ABSTRACT: The genetic basis underlying the majority of hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is unknown. Since DNA repair genes are widely implicated in gastrointestinal malignancies, including PC, we hypothesized that there are novel DNA repair PC susceptibility genes. As germline DNA repair gene mutations may lead to PC subtypes with selective therapeutic responses, we also hypothesized that there is an overall survival (OS) difference in mutation carriers versus non-carriers. We therefore interrogated the germline exomes of 109 high-risk PC cases for rare protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in 513 putative DNA repair genes. We identified PTVs in 41 novel genes among 36 kindred. Additional genetic evidence for causality was obtained for 17 genes, with FAN1, NEK1 and RHNO1 emerging as the strongest candidates. An OS difference was observed for carriers versus non-carriers of PTVs with early stage (≤IIB) disease. This adverse survival trend in carriers with early stage disease was also observed in an independent series of 130 PC cases. We identified candidate DNA repair PC susceptibility genes and suggest that carriers of a germline PTV in a DNA repair gene with early stage disease have worse survival.

3 Article Increased in vitro and in vivo sensitivity of BRCA2-associated pancreatic cancer to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1/2 inhibitor BMN 673. 2015

Andrei, Alexandra-Zoe / Hall, Anita / Smith, Alyssa L / Bascuñana, Claire / Malina, Abba / Connor, Ashton / Altinel-Omeroglu, Gulbeyaz / Huang, Sidong / Pelletier, Jerry / Huntsman, David / Gallinger, Steven / Omeroglu, Atilla / Metrakos, Peter / Zogopoulos, George. ·Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Ave. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1A3; The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4A 3J1. · Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y6. · The Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, 600 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1X5. · Department of Pathology, McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4A 3J1. · Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Ave. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1A3; Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, 3655 Promenade Sir William Osler, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3G 1Y6. · Centre for the Translational and Applied Genomics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, 675 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada V5Z 1L4. · The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4A 3J1. · Rosalind and Morris Goodman Cancer Research Centre, McGill University, 1160 Pine Ave. West, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H3A 1A3; The Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, 1001 Decarie Boulevard, Montreal, Quebec, Canada H4A 3J1. Electronic address: george.zogopoulos@mcgill.ca. ·Cancer Lett · Pubmed #25864590.

ABSTRACT: BRCA2-associated pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) may be sensitive to agents that target homology-directed DNA repair, such as DNA crosslinking agents (DCLs) and PARP inhibitors (PARPis). Here, we assessed the sensitivities of BRCA2-deficient (Capan-1) and BRCA2-proficient (MIA PaCa-2) PDAC cell lines to a panel of DCLs and PARPis. Compared to MIA PaCa-2, Capan-1 was significantly more sensitive to all tested DCLs and PARPis, with similar increased sensitivities to cisplatin and the PARPi BMN 673 compared to other DCLs and the PARPi veliparib. We provide further support for this observation by showing that shRNA-mediated BRCA2 knockdown in PANC-1, a BRCA2-proficient cell line, induces sensitization to cisplatin and BMN 673 but not to veliparib. These findings were validated in a PDAC murine xenograft model derived from a patient with bi-allelic BRCA2 mutations. We found 64% and 61% tumor growth inhibition of this xenograft with cisplatin and BMN 673 treatments, respectively. Cisplatin and BMN 673 treatments reduced cellular proliferation and induced apoptosis. Our findings support a personalized treatment approach for BRCA2-associated PDAC.