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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Catherine Hagen
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Catherine Hagen wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Survival of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer who received neoadjuvant therapy and surgery. 2019

Barnes, Chad A / Chavez, Mariana I / Tsai, Susan / Aldakkak, Mohammed / George, Ben / Ritch, Paul S / Dua, Kulwinder / Clarke, Callisia N / Tolat, Parag / Hagen, Catherine / Hall, William A / Erickson, Beth A / Evans, Douglas B / Christians, Kathleen K. ·Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Radiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. · Pancreatic Cancer Program, Department of Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI. Electronic address: kchristi@mcw.edu. ·Surgery · Pubmed #31272811.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: It is difficult to successfully deliver multimodality therapy to patients with operable pancreatic cancer. Data on the natural history of such efforts are necessary for physicians to guide shared decision-making with patients and families. We report the survival of consecutive patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer who received neoadjuvant therapy before surgery. METHODS: Data regarding demographics, neoadjuvant therapy, surgery, pathology, and survival duration were abstracted on consecutive patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer diagnosed between 2009 and 2017 and not treated on available clinical trials. Borderline resectable pancreatic cancer was defined based on ≥1 of the following: local tumor anatomy, pretreatment serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 >2,000 U/mL, and the presence of radiographic lesions indeterminate for metastases. RESULTS: Neoadjuvant therapy was delivered to 185 patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer who were not enrolled in competing clinical trials; 13 (7%) patients received chemoradiation, 12 (7%) received chemotherapy, and 160 (86%) received both. Of the 185 patients, 115 (62%) completed all intended neoadjuvant therapy and surgery; 81 (70%) of 115 underwent pancreaticoduodenectomy; and vascular reconstruction was performed in 51 (44%). A margin negative resection was achieved in 111 (97%) of 115 patients, and 83 (72%) were node negative. Median overall survival for all 185 patients was 20 months; 31 months for the 115 patients who completed all neoadjuvant therapy and surgery as compared to 13 months for the 70 patients who were not resected (P < .0001). CONCLUSION: After neoadjuvant therapy, surgical resection was performed in 62% of patients with borderline resectable pancreatic cancer. Those who normalized preoperative serum carbohydrate antigen 19-9 and had node negative pathology achieved the longest survival. To further improve median survival for all patients, we are incorporating adaptive approaches to neoadjuvant therapy sequencing based on objective assessments of response.

2 Article Ex vivo human bile duct radiofrequency ablation with a bipolar catheter. 2018

Atar, Mustafa / Kadayifci, Abdurrahman / Daglilar, Ebubekir / Hagen, Catherine / Fernandez-Del Castillo, Carlos / Brugge, William R. ·Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3-H GI Associates, Zero Emerson Place, Blossom St., Boston, MA, 02114, USA. · Division of Gastroenterology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 3-H GI Associates, Zero Emerson Place, Blossom St., Boston, MA, 02114, USA. kadayifci@hotmail.com. · Unit of Gastroenterology, Reyap Istanbul Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey. kadayifci@hotmail.com. · Department of Pathology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. · Department of Pathology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI, USA. · Department of Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. ·Surg Endosc · Pubmed #29264758.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Management of the primary and secondary tumors of the bile ducts still remains as a major clinical challenge. Radiofrequency (RF) ablation (RFA) of these tumors is feasible but the effect of RF energy on the human common bile duct (CBD) and surrounding tissues has not been investigated. This pilot study aimed to determine the relationship between RF energy and the depth of ablation in the normal human CBD. METHODS: The study was performed on fresh ex vivo human biliary-pancreatic tissue which had been resected for a pancreatic cyst or mass. The study was conducted within 15 min after resection. A bipolar Habib RFA catheter was placed into the middle of the intact CBD, and three different (5, 7, 10 W) power settings were applied over a 90-s period by an RF generator. Gross and histological examinations were performed. The depth of coagulation necrosis in CBD and the effect of RFA on CBD wall and surrounding pancreas tissue were determined by microscopic examination. RESULTS: The study included eight tissue samples. 5 W power was applied to three sites and RFA caused only focal epithelial necrosis limited to the CBD mucosa. 7 and 10 W were applied to five sites and coagulation necrosis occurred in all cases. Microscopically, necrosis was transmural, involved accessory bile duct glands, and extended to the surrounding pancreatic tissue in four of these cases. Macroscopically, RFA resulted in circumferential white-yellowish color change extending approximately 2 cm of the CBD. CONCLUSION: Bipolar RF energy application with 5 W resulted in limited ablation on CBD wall. However, 7 and 10 W generated tissue necrosis which extended through the CBD wall and into surrounding pancreas tissue. Endoscopic biliary RFA is an effective technique for local biliary tissue ablation but the use of high energy may injure surrounding tissue.