Pick Topic
Review Topic
List Experts
Examine Expert
Save Expert
  Site Guide ··   
Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Carmen Guillén Ponce
Based on 14 articles published since 2009
(Why 14 articles?)
||||

Between 2009 and 2019, C. Guillen Ponce wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Diagnosis and staging of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. 2017

Guillén-Ponce, C / Blázquez, J / González, I / de-Madaria, E / Montáns, J / Carrato, A. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, km 9,100, Madrid, Spain. carmenguillenponce@gmail.com. · Department of Radiology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid and Hospital MD Anderson, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Complejo Hospitalario de Granada, Granada, Spain. · Pancreatic Unit, Gastroenterology Department, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Centro Anatomopatológico, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, km 9,100, Madrid, Spain. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #28612200.

ABSTRACT: The management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a major public health concern worldwide. Currently, most PDAC patients are diagnosed in advanced stages. The signs and symptoms of the disease, except for jaundice, are non-specific. Thus, the current challenge is to identify earlier those individuals for whom specific screening tools and specific treatments would be beneficial. On the basis of the recommendations of the group of experts of multiple medical specialties of the GALLgo Project, the patients with PDAC should be managed by a multidisciplinary team to assess the personal and family history, the best diagnostic and staging procedures and consider all important aspects for treatment decisions. In this article, the group of experts proposes strategies to shorten the diagnosis times in PDAC patients.

2 Review Reduced risk of pancreatic cancer associated with asthma and nasal allergies. 2017

Gomez-Rubio, Paulina / Zock, Jan-Paul / Rava, Marta / Marquez, Mirari / Sharp, Linda / Hidalgo, Manuel / Carrato, Alfredo / Ilzarbe, Lucas / Michalski, Christoph / Molero, Xavier / Farré, Antoni / Perea, José / Greenhalf, William / O'Rorke, Michael / Tardón, Adonina / Gress, Thomas / Barberà, Victor / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, Tatjana / Domínguez-Muñoz, Enrique / Muñoz-Bellvís, Luís / Alvarez-Urturi, Cristina / Balcells, Joaquim / Barneo, Luis / Costello, Eithne / Guillén-Ponce, Carmen / Kleeff, Jörg / Kong, Bo / Lawlor, Rita / Löhr, Matthias / Mora, Josefina / Murray, Lim / O'Driscoll, Damian / Peláez, Pablo / Poves, Ignasi / Scarpa, Aldo / Real, Francisco X / Malats, Núria / Anonymous6460850. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain. · National Cancer Registry Ireland, Cork, Ireland, and Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, UK. · Hospital Madrid-Norte-Sanchinarro, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital del Mar-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit, Hospital Universitari Vall d'Hebron, Barcelona, Spain. · Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool, UK. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Instituto Universitario de Oncología del Principado de Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Laboratorio de Genética Molecular, Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, London, UK. · Hospital Clínico Universitario de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · Cirugía General y del Aparato Digestivo, Hospital Universitario de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain. · Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Gastrocentrum, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. ·Gut · Pubmed #26628509.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Studies indicate an inverse association between ductal adenocarcinoma of the pancreas (PDAC) and nasal allergies. However, controversial findings are reported for the association with asthma. Understanding PDAC risk factors will help us to implement appropriate strategies to prevent, treat and diagnose this cancer. This study assessed and characterised the association between PDAC and asthma and corroborated existing reports regarding the association between allergies and PDAC risk. DESIGN: Information about asthma and allergies was collated from 1297 PDAC cases and 1024 controls included in the PanGenEU case-control study. Associations between PDAC and atopic diseases were studied using multilevel logistic regression analysis. Meta-analyses of association studies on these diseases and PDAC risk were performed applying random-effects model. RESULTS: Asthma was associated with lower risk of PDAC (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.88), particularly long-standing asthma (>=17 years, OR 0.39, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.65). Meta-analysis of 10 case-control studies sustained our results (metaOR 0.73, 95% CI 0.59 to 0.89). Nasal allergies and related symptoms were associated with lower risk of PDAC (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.52 to 0.83 and OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.46 to 0.77, respectively). These results were supported by a meta-analysis of nasal allergy studies (metaOR 0.6, 95% CI 0.5 to 0.72). Skin allergies were not associated with PDAC risk. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows a consistent inverse association between PDAC and asthma and nasal allergies, supporting the notion that atopic diseases are associated with reduced cancer risk. These results point to the involvement of immune and/or inflammatory factors that may either foster or restrain pancreas carcinogenesis warranting further research to understand the molecular mechanisms driving this association.

3 Review Multidisciplinary management of locally advanced-borderline resectable adenocarcinoma of the head of the pancreas. 2013

Calvo, F / Guillen Ponce, C / Muñoz Beltran, M / Sanjuanbenito Dehesa, A. ·Department of Radiotherapy, Hospital Gregorio Marañon, Madrid, Spain. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #23180346.

ABSTRACT: Borderline resectable pancreatic head carcinoma is a challenging disease that requires multidisciplinary approach to obtain maximal benefits from current therapeutical possibilities. We review current knowledge and therapeutic options for the patients from the surgical, medical oncology and radiotherapy views and emphasize the need for a coordinated multidisciplinary approach to obtain optimal results.

4 Clinical Trial Phase I/II Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine in Patients With Pancreatic Cancer and an ECOG Performance Status of 2. 2019

Macarulla, Teresa / Pazo-Cid, Roberto / Guillén-Ponce, Carmen / López, Rafael / Vera, Ruth / Reboredo, Margarita / Muñoz Martin, Andrés / Rivera, Fernando / Díaz Beveridge, Roberto / La Casta, Adelaida / Martín Valadés, José / Martínez-Galán, Joaquina / Ales, Immaculada / Sastre, Javier / Perea, Sofia / Hidalgo, Manuel. ·1 Vall d'Hebrón University Hospital and Vall d'Hebrón Institute of Oncology, Barcelona, Spain. · 2 Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain. · 3 Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · 4 Hospital Clínico de Santiago, Santiago de Compostela, Spain. · 5 Hospital de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · 6 Hospital Universitario A Coruña, A Coruña, Spain. · 7 Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. · 8 Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. · 9 Hospital Universitari i Politècnic La Fe, Valencia, Spain. · 10 Hospital Universitario Donostia, Donostia, Spain. · 11 Hospital Universitario Fundación Jiménez Díaz, Madrid, Spain. · 12 Hospital Universitario Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain. · 13 Hospital Universitario Carlos Haya, Málaga, Spain. · 14 Hospital Clínico Universitario San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · 15 Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncológicas and Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain. ·J Clin Oncol · Pubmed #30523758.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: Gemcitabine plus nanoparticle albumin-bound (NAB) paclitaxel (GA) significantly improved survival compared with gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and a Karnofsky performance status (PS) of 70% or greater. Because of the low number of patients with reduced PS, the efficacy of this regimen in fragile patients remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of different GA dosing regimens in patients with a poor PS. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In the phase I part of this study, patients were randomly assigned to one of the following four parallel GA treatment arms (six patients per arm): a biweekly schedule of NAB-paclitaxel (150 mg/m RESULTS: Arms B and D were selected for the phase II part of the study. A total of 221 patients (111 patients in arm B and 110 patients in arm D) were enrolled. Baseline characteristics including median age (71 and 68 years in arms B and D, respectively), sex (51% and 55% men in arms B and D, respectively), and metastatic disease (88% and 84% in arms B and D, respectively) were comparable between arms. The most frequent grade 3 or 4 toxicities in arms B and D were anemia (12% and 7%, respectively), neutropenia (32% and 30%, respectively), thrombocytopenia (7% and 11%, respectively), asthenia (14% and 16%, respectively), and neurotoxicity (11% and 16%, respectively). In arms B and D, there were no significant differences in response rate (24% and 28%, respectively), median progression-free survival (5.7 and 6.7 months, respectively), and 6-month overall survival (63% and 69%, respectively). CONCLUSION: NAB-paclitaxel administered at either 100 and 125 mg/m

5 Clinical Trial Tumor treating fields in combination with gemcitabine or gemcitabine plus nab-paclitaxel in pancreatic cancer: Results of the PANOVA phase 2 study. 2019

Rivera, Fernando / Benavides, Manuel / Gallego, Javier / Guillen-Ponce, Carmen / Lopez-Martin, José / Küng, Marc. ·Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. Electronic address: fernando.rivera@scsalud.es. · Hospital Universitario Regional y Virgen de la Victoria, Andalucia, Spain. Electronic address: manuel.benavides.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es. · Plazas Hospital General Universitario de Elche, Elche, Spain. Electronic address: gallego.jav@gva.es. · Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: carmen.guillen@salud.madrid.org. · Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: jalopez.hdoc@salud.madrid.org. · Hôpital Fribourgeois, Fribourg, Switzerland. Electronic address: marc.kueng@h-fr.ch. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #30396819.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Tumor Treating Fields (TTFields), low intensity alternating electric fields with antimitotic activity, have demonstrated survival benefit in patients with glioblastoma. This phase 2 PANOVA study was conducted to examine the combination of TTFields plus chemotherapy in patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). METHODS: Forty patients with newly-diagnosed, locally advanced or metastatic PDAC received continuous TTFields (150 KHz for ≥18 h/day) plus gemcitabine (1000 mg/m RESULTS: Seventeen patients (85%) in each cohort reported Grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs). No increase in serious AEs (SAEs) was observed compared to that anticipated with systemic chemotherapy alone. Twenty-one patients reported TTFields-related skin toxicity, of which 7 were Grade 3; all resolved following temporary reduction of daily TTFields usage. No TTFields-related SAEs were reported. Compliance to TTFields was 68-78% of the recommended average daily use in both cohorts. Median PFS was 8.3 months (95% CI 4.3, 10.3) and median OS was 14.9 months (95% CI 6.2, NA) in the TTFields + gemcitabine cohort. In the TTFields + gemcitabine + nab-paclitaxel cohort, the median PFS was 12.7 months (95% CI 5.4, NA); median OS has not been reached. CONCLUSION: The PANOVA trial demonstrated that the combination of TTFields and systemic chemotherapy is safe and tolerable in patients with advanced PDAC. Based on the safety and preliminary efficacy results of this phase 2 study, a randomized phase 3 study (PANOVA-3) is underway.

6 Clinical Trial A phase II study of antibody-drug conjugate, TAK-264 (MLN0264) in previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing guanylyl cyclase C. 2017

Almhanna, Khaldoun / Wright, David / Mercade, Teresa Macarulla / Van Laethem, Jean-Luc / Gracian, Antonio Cubillo / Guillen-Ponce, Carmen / Faris, Jason / Lopez, Carolina Muriel / Hubner, Richard A / Bendell, Johanna / Bols, Alain / Feliu, Jaime / Starling, Naureen / Enzinger, Peter / Mahalingham, Devalingham / Messersmith, Wells / Yang, Huyuan / Fasanmade, Adedigbo / Danaee, Hadi / Kalebic, Thea. ·Department of Gastrointestinal Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL, 33612, USA. Khaldoun.Almhanna@moffitt.org. · Florida Cancer Specialists, Tampa, FL, USA. · Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Erasme University Hospital, Brussels, Belgium. · HM Universitario Sanchinarro, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal (CIOCC), Madrid, Spain. · Departamento de Ciencias Médicas Clínicas, Universidad San Pablo CEU, Madrid, Spain. · Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA, USA. · Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain. · The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology, Nashville, TN, USA. · Brugge Oostende Oncologisch Centrum, Bruges, Belgium. · CIBERONC, La Paz University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK. · Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA. · University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX, USA. · University of Colorado, Aurora, CO, USA. · Millennium Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary of Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, Cambridge, MA, USA. ·Invest New Drugs · Pubmed #28527133.

ABSTRACT: Background This phase II open-label, multicenter study evaluated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of TAK-264 in previously treated patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing guanylyl cyclase C (GCC). Methods Patients with advanced or metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma expressing GCC (H-score ≥ 10) received TAK-264 1.8 mg/kg on day 1 of a 21-day cycle as a 30-min intravenous infusion for up to 1 year or until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary objective was overall response rate (ORR [complete response + partial response (PR)]). Secondary objectives included evaluations of the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of TAK-264 (NCT02202785). Results 43 patients were enrolled and treated with 1.8 mg/kg TAK-264: 11, 15, and 17 patients with low, intermediate, and high GCC expression, respectively. Median number of treatment cycles received was two (range 1-10). The ORR was 3%, including one patient with intermediate GCC expression who achieved a PR. All patients experienced ≥1 adverse events (AE). The majority of patients experienced grade 1/2 AEs affecting the gastrointestinal tract. Fifteen (35%) patients experienced ≥grade 3 drug-related AEs; five (12%) patients had a serious AE. The most common (≥10% of patients) all-grade drug-related AEs were nausea (33%), fatigue (28%), neutropenia (23%), decreased appetite (23%), vomiting (16%), asthenia (16%), and alopecia (14%). Conclusions TAK-264 demonstrated a manageable safety profile; however, the low efficacy of TAK-264 observed in this study did not support further clinical investigation.

7 Clinical Trial Gemcitabine-erlotinib versus gemcitabine-erlotinib-capecitabine in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer: Efficacy and safety results of a phase IIb randomised study from the Spanish TTD Collaborative Group. 2017

Irigoyen, Antonio / Gallego, Javier / Guillén Ponce, Carmen / Vera, Ruth / Iranzo, Vega / Ales, Inmaculada / Arévalo, Sara / Pisa, Aleydis / Martín, Marta / Salud, Antonieta / Falcó, Esther / Sáenz, Alberto / Manzano Mozo, José Luis / Pulido, Gema / Martínez Galán, Joaquina / Pazo-Cid, Roberto / Rivera, Fernando / García García, Teresa / Serra, Olbia / Fernández Parra, Eva Ma / Hurtado, Alicia / Gómez Reina, Ma José / López Gomez, Luis Jesús / Martínez Ortega, Esther / Benavides, Manuel / Aranda, Enrique / Anonymous3550897. ·Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Toledo, Spain. Electronic address: antonioirigoyen@yahoo.com. · General Universitario de Elche Hospital, Alicante, Spain. · Universitario Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Navarra Hospital, Navarra, Spain. · General Hospital, Valencia, Spain. · Hospital Regional Universitario y Virgen de la Victoria, Málaga, Spain. · Donostia Hospital, Guipúzcoa, Spain. · Sabadell Hospital, Corporación Sanitaria Parc Tauli, Barcelona, Spain. · Santa Creu i Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Lleida Arnau de Vilanova Hospital, Lérida, Spain. · Fundación Son Llatzer Hospital, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. · Clínico Lozano Blesa Hospital, Zaragoza, Spain. · Germans Trias i Pujol-ICO Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · Maimonides Institute of Biomedical Research (IMIBIC), Reina Sofía Hospital, University of Córdoba, Spanish Cancer Network (RTICC), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Córdoba, Spain. · Universitario Virgen de las Nieves Hospital, Granada, Spain. · Aragon Institute of Biomedical Research (IISA), Miguel Servet University Hospital, Spanish Cancer Network (RTICC), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Zaragoza, Spain. · Marqués de Valdecilla Hospital, Santander, Spain. · Morales Meseguer Hospital, Murcia, Spain. · Moisés Broggi Hospital, Institut Català Oncologia - Hospitalet del Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Nuestra Señora de Valme Hospital, Sevilla, Spain. · Fundación Hospital de Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain. · Puerta del Mar Hospital, Cádiz, Spain. · Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Toledo, Spain. · Ciudad de Jaén Hospital, Jaén, Spain. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #28222309.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine and erlotinib have shown a survival benefit in the first-line setting in metastatic pancreatic cancer (mPC). The aim of this study was to assess whether combining capecitabine (C) with gemcitabine + erlotinib (GE) was safe and effective versus GE in patients with mPC. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Previously untreated mPC patients were randomised to receive G (1000 mg/m RESULTS: 120 patients were randomised, median age 63 years, ECOG status 0/1/2 33%/58%/8%; median follow-up 16.5 months. Median PFS in the gemcitabine-erlotinib-capecitabine (GEC) and GE arms was 4.3 and 3.8 months, respectively (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58-1.31; p = 0.52). Median OS in the GEC and GE arms was 6.8 and 7.7 months, respectively (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.72-1.63; p = 0.69). Grade 3/4 neutropenia (GEC 43% versus GE 15%; p = 0.0008) and mucositis (GEC 9% versus GE 0%; p = 0.03) were the only statistically significant differences in grade 3/4 adverse events. PFS and OS were significantly longer in patients with rash (grade ≥1) versus no rash (grade = 0): PFS 5.5 versus 2.0 months (HR = 0.39, 95% CI: 0.26-0.6; p < 0.0001) and OS: 9.5 versus 4.0 months (HR = 0.51, 95% CI: 0.33-0.77; p = 0.0014). CONCLUSION: PFS with GEC was not significantly different to that with GE in patients with mPC. Skin rash strongly predicted erlotinib efficacy. The study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01303029.

8 Article Integrative multi-platform meta-analysis of gene expression profiles in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patients for identifying novel diagnostic biomarkers. 2018

Irigoyen, Antonio / Jimenez-Luna, Cristina / Benavides, Manuel / Caba, Octavio / Gallego, Javier / Ortuño, Francisco Manuel / Guillen-Ponce, Carmen / Rojas, Ignacio / Aranda, Enrique / Torres, Carolina / Prados, Jose. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Toledo, Spain. · Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER), Center of Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, Granada, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Virgen de la Victoria Hospital, Malaga, Spain. · Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, University General Hospital of Elche, Alicante, Spain. · Department of Computer Architecture and Computer Technology, Research Center for Information and Communications Technologies, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Maimonides Institute of Biomedical Research (IMIBIC), Reina Sofia Hospital, University of Cordoba, Cordoba, Spain. · Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, Faculty of Sciences, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29617451.

ABSTRACT: Applying differentially expressed genes (DEGs) to identify feasible biomarkers in diseases can be a hard task when working with heterogeneous datasets. Expression data are strongly influenced by technology, sample preparation processes, and/or labeling methods. The proliferation of different microarray platforms for measuring gene expression increases the need to develop models able to compare their results, especially when different technologies can lead to signal values that vary greatly. Integrative meta-analysis can significantly improve the reliability and robustness of DEG detection. The objective of this work was to develop an integrative approach for identifying potential cancer biomarkers by integrating gene expression data from two different platforms. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), where there is an urgent need to find new biomarkers due its late diagnosis, is an ideal candidate for testing this technology. Expression data from two different datasets, namely Affymetrix and Illumina (18 and 36 PDAC patients, respectively), as well as from 18 healthy controls, was used for this study. A meta-analysis based on an empirical Bayesian methodology (ComBat) was then proposed to integrate these datasets. DEGs were finally identified from the integrated data by using the statistical programming language R. After our integrative meta-analysis, 5 genes were commonly identified within the individual analyses of the independent datasets. Also, 28 novel genes that were not reported by the individual analyses ('gained' genes) were also discovered. Several of these gained genes have been already related to other gastroenterological tumors. The proposed integrative meta-analysis has revealed novel DEGs that may play an important role in PDAC and could be potential biomarkers for diagnosing the disease.

9 Article A systems approach identifies time-dependent associations of multimorbidities with pancreatic cancer risk. 2017

Gomez-Rubio, P / Rosato, V / Márquez, M / Bosetti, C / Molina-Montes, E / Rava, M / Piñero, J / Michalski, C W / Farré, A / Molero, X / Löhr, M / Ilzarbe, L / Perea, J / Greenhalf, W / O'Rorke, M / Tardón, A / Gress, T / Barberá, V M / Crnogorac-Jurcevic, T / Muñoz-Bellvís, L / Domínguez-Muñoz, E / Gutiérrez-Sacristán, A / Balsells, J / Costello, E / Guillén-Ponce, C / Huang, J / Iglesias, M / Kleeff, J / Kong, B / Mora, J / Murray, L / O'Driscoll, D / Peláez, P / Poves, I / Lawlor, R T / Carrato, A / Hidalgo, M / Scarpa, A / Sharp, L / Furlong, L I / Real, F X / La Vecchia, C / Malats, N / Anonymous4870902. ·Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Branch of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Epidemiology "G.A. Maccacaro," Department of Clinical Sciences and Community Health, University of Milan, Milan. · Unit of Medical Statistics, Biometry and Bioinformatics, National Cancer Institute, IRCCS Foundation, Milan. · Department of Epidemiology, Mario Negri Institute for Pharmacological Research-IRCCS, Milan, Italy. · Research Programme on Biomedical Informatics (GRIB), Hospital del Mar Research Institute (IMIM), Pompeu Fabra Univeristy (UPF), Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Technical University of Munich, Munich. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Santa Creu i Sant Pau Hospital, Barcelona. · Exocrine Pancreas Research Unit and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR), Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, Barcelona. · Department of Medicine, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona. · Network of Biomedical Research Centres (CIBER), Hepatic and Digestive Diseases and Epidemiology and Public Health, Madrid, Spain. · Gastrocentrum, Karolinska Institutet and University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. · Department of Gastroenterology, Parc de Salut Mar University Hospital, Barcelona. · Department of Surgery, 12 de Octubre University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Molecular and Clinical Cancer Medicine, The Royal Liverpool University Hospital, Liverpool. · Centre for Public Health, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UK. · Department of Medicine, University Institute of Oncology of Asturias, Oviedo, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital of Giessen and Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Molecular Genetics Laboratory, General University Hospital of Elche, Elche, Spain. · Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, Queen Mary University of London, John Vane Science Centre, London, UK. · General and Digestive Surgery Department, Salamanca University Hospital, Salamanca. · Department of Gastroenterology, Clinical University Hospital of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela. · Department of Oncology, Ramón y Cajal Hospital, Madrid, and CIBERONC, Spain. · Research Programme, National Cancer Registry Ireland. · ARC-Net Centre for Applied Research on Cancer and Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital trust of Verona, Verona, Italy. · Clara Campal Integrated Oncological Centre, Sanchinarro Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Institute of Health & Society, Newcastle University, UK. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, and CIBERONC. · Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Pompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Spain. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #28383714.

ABSTRACT: Background: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is usually diagnosed in late adulthood; therefore, many patients suffer or have suffered from other diseases. Identifying disease patterns associated with PDAC risk may enable a better characterization of high-risk patients. Methods: Multimorbidity patterns (MPs) were assessed from 17 self-reported conditions using hierarchical clustering, principal component, and factor analyses in 1705 PDAC cases and 1084 controls from a European population. Their association with PDAC was evaluated using adjusted logistic regression models. Time since diagnosis of morbidities to PDAC diagnosis/recruitment was stratified into recent (<3 years) and long term (≥3 years). The MPs and PDAC genetic networks were explored with DisGeNET bioinformatics-tool which focuses on gene-diseases associations available in curated databases. Results: Three MPs were observed: gastric (heartburn, acid regurgitation, Helicobacter pylori infection, and ulcer), metabolic syndrome (obesity, type-2 diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension), and atopic (nasal allergies, skin allergies, and asthma). Strong associations with PDAC were observed for ≥2 recently diagnosed gastric conditions [odds ratio (OR), 6.13; 95% confidence interval CI 3.01-12.5)] and for ≥3 recently diagnosed metabolic syndrome conditions (OR, 1.61; 95% CI 1.11-2.35). Atopic conditions were negatively associated with PDAC (high adherence score OR for tertile III, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.36-0.55). Combining type-2 diabetes with gastric MP resulted in higher PDAC risk for recent (OR, 7.89; 95% CI 3.9-16.1) and long-term diagnosed conditions (OR, 1.86; 95% CI 1.29-2.67). A common genetic basis between MPs and PDAC was observed in the bioinformatics analysis. Conclusions: Specific multimorbidities aggregate and associate with PDAC in a time-dependent manner. A better characterization of a high-risk population for PDAC may help in the early diagnosis of this cancer. The common genetic basis between MP and PDAC points to a mechanistic link between these conditions.

10 Article Consensus guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with pancreatic cancer in Spain. 2017

Hidalgo, M / Álvarez, R / Gallego, J / Guillén-Ponce, C / Laquente, B / Macarulla, T / Muñoz, A / Salgado, M / Vera, R / Adeva, J / Alés, I / Arévalo, S / Blázquez, J / Calsina, A / Carmona, A / de Madaria, E / Díaz, R / Díez, L / Fernández, T / de Paredes, B G / Gallardo, M E / González, I / Hernando, O / Jiménez, P / López, A / López, C / López-Ríos, F / Martín, E / Martínez, J / Martínez, A / Montans, J / Pazo, R / Plaza, J C / Peiró, I / Reina, J J / Sanjuanbenito, A / Yaya, R / Carrato, Alfredo. ·Spanish National Cancer Centre, C/Melchor Fernández Almagro, 3, 28029, Madrid, Spain. mhidalgo@cnio.es. · Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, USA. mhidalgo@cnio.es. · Department of Medical Oncology, Centro Integral Oncológico Clara Campal, Madrid, Spain. · University Hospital of Elche, Elche, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Ctra. de Colmenar Viejo km. 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. · Institut Català d´Oncologia, Duran y Reynals Hospital, Hospitalet Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Vall d'Hebrón University Hospital, Barcelona, Spain. · University Hospital Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain. · University Hospital of Ourense, Ourense, Spain. · Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain. · University Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain. · Hospital Carlos Haya, Málaga, Spain. · University Hospital Donostia, San Sebastián, Spain. · Department of Radiology, University Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · MD Anderson Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Palliative Care, Hospital Germans Trias I Pujol, Institut Catalá d´Oncologia, Badalona, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, University Hospital Morales Messeguer, Murcia, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology, Hospital General Universitario de Alicante, Alicante, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitari I Politècnic La Fe, Valencia, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Son Llàtzer, Palma de Mallorca, Spain. · Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain. · Complejo Hospitalario Universitario de Pontevedra, Pontevedra, Spain. · Complejo Hospitalario de Granada, Granada, Spain. · Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital HM Sanchinarro, Madrid, Spain. · University Hospital HM Puerta del Sur, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Asturias, Spain. · Hospital Universitario de Burgos, Burgos, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Marqués de Valdecilla, Santander, Spain. · Department of Pathology, University Hospital HM Sanchinarro, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Virgen de las Nieves, Granada, Spain. · Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Centro Anatomopatológico, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Miguel Servet, Saragossa, Spain. · Department of Endocrinology, Instituto Catalán de Oncología, Hospital Duran I Reynals, Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, University Hospital Virgen de la Macarena, Seville, Spain. · Department of Surgery, University Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Medical Oncology, Fundación Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, Valencia, Spain. · Hospital Universitario Ramón y Cajal, Ctra. de Colmenar Viejo km. 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. acarrato@telefonica.net. ·Clin Transl Oncol · Pubmed #27995549.

ABSTRACT: The management of patients with pancreatic cancer has advanced over the last few years. We convey a multidisciplinary group of experts in an attempt to stablish practical guidelines for the diagnoses, staging and management of these patients. This paper summarizes the main conclusions of the working group. Patients with suspected pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma should be rapidly evaluated and referred to high-volume centers. Multidisciplinary supervision is critical for proper diagnoses, staging and to frame a treatment plan. Surgical resection together with chemotherapy offers the highest chance for cure in early stage disease. Patients with advanced disease should be classified in treatment groups to guide systemic treatment. New chemotherapeutic regimens have resulted in improved survival. Symptomatic management is critical in this disease. Enrollment in a clinical trial is, in general, recommended.

11 Article Identification of gene expression profiling associated with erlotinib-related skin toxicity in pancreatic adenocarcinoma patients. 2016

Caba, Octavio / Irigoyen, Antonio / Jimenez-Luna, Cristina / Benavides, Manuel / Ortuño, Francisco M / Gallego, Javier / Rojas, Ignacio / Guillen-Ponce, Carmen / Torres, Carolina / Aranda, Enrique / Prados, Jose. ·Department of Health Sciences, University of Jaen, Jaen, Spain. Electronic address: ocaba@ujaen.es. · Department of Medical Oncology, Virgen de la Salud Hospital, Toledo, Spain. Electronic address: antonioirigoyen@yahoo.com. · Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER), Center of Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Electronic address: crisjilu@ugr.es. · Department of Medical Oncology, Virgen de la Victoria Hospital, Malaga, Spain. Electronic address: manuel.benavides.sspa@juntadeandalucia.es. · Department of Computer Architecture and Computer Technology, Research Center for Information and Communications Technologies, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Electronic address: fortuno@ugr.es. · Department of Medical Oncology, General Universitario de Elche Hospital, Alicante, Spain. Electronic address: j.gallegoplazas@gmail.com. · Department of Computer Architecture and Computer Technology, Research Center for Information and Communications Technologies, University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Electronic address: irojas@ugr.es. · Department of Medical Oncology, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: carmen.guillen@salud.madrid.org. · Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA. Electronic address: ctorres@uic.edu. · Maimonides Institute of Biomedical Research (IMIBIC), Reina Sofía Hospital, University of Córdoba, Córdoba, Spain. Electronic address: enrique.aranda@imibic.org. · Institute of Biopathology and Regenerative Medicine (IBIMER), Center of Biomedical Research (CIBM), University of Granada, Granada, Spain. Electronic address: jcprados@ugr.es. ·Toxicol Appl Pharmacol · Pubmed #27720938.

ABSTRACT: Erlotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor that showed activity against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The drug's most frequently reported side effect as a result of EGFR inhibition is skin rash (SR), a symptom which has been associated with a better therapeutic response to the drug. Gene expression profiling can be used as a tool to predict which patients will develop this important cutaneous manifestation. The aim of the present study was to identify which genes may influence the appearance of SR in PDAC patients. The study included 34 PDAC patients treated with erlotinib: 21 patients developed any grade of SR, while 13 patients did not (controls). Before administering any chemotherapy regimen and the development of SR, we collected RNA from peripheral blood samples of all patients and studied the differential gene expression pattern using the Illumina microarray platform HumanHT-12 v4 Expression BeadChip. Seven genes (FAM46C, IFITM3, GMPR, DENND6B, SELENBP1, NOL10, and SIAH2), involved in different pathways including regulatory, migratory, and signalling processes, were downregulated in PDAC patients with SR. Our results suggest the existence of a gene expression profiling significantly correlated with erlotinib-induced SR in PDAC that could be used as prognostic indicator in this patients.

12 Article Refinement of screening for familial pancreatic cancer. 2016

Bartsch, D K / Slater, E P / Carrato, A / Ibrahim, I S / Guillen-Ponce, C / Vasen, H F A / Matthäi, E / Earl, J / Jendryschek, F S / Figiel, J / Steinkamp, M / Ramaswamy, A / Vázquez-Sequeiros, E / Muñoz-Beltran, M / Montans, J / Mocci, E / Bonsing, B A / Wasser, M / Klöppel, G / Langer, P / Fendrich, V / Gress, T M. ·Department of Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Medical Oncology, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Pathology, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany. · Department of Gastroenterology, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Radiology, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Pathology, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Department of Surgery, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Radiology, Leiden University Medical Centre, Leiden, The Netherlands. · Department of Pathology, Consultation Centre for Pancreatic Tumors, Technical University Munich, Munich, Germany. · Department of Visceral, Thoracic and Vascular Surgery, Philipps University Marburg, Marburg, Germany Department of General Surgery, Klinikum Hanau GmbH, Hanau, Germany. ·Gut · Pubmed #27222532.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: Surveillance programmes are recommended for individuals at risk (IAR) of familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) to detect early pancreatic cancer (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, PDAC). However, the age to begin screening and the optimal screening protocol remain to be determined. METHODS: IAR from non-CDKN2A FPC families underwent annual screening by MRI with endoscopic ultrasonography (EUS) in board-approved prospective screening programmes at three tertiary referral centres. The diagnostic yield according to age and different screening protocols was analysed. RESULTS: 253 IAR with a median age of 48 (25-81) years underwent screening with a median of 3 (1-11) screening visits during a median follow-up of 28 (1-152) months. 134 (53%) IAR revealed pancreatic lesions on imaging, mostly cystic (94%), on baseline or follow-up screening. Lesions were significantly more often identified in IAR above the age of 45 years (p<0.0001). In 21 IAR who underwent surgery, no significant lesions (PDAC, pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) 3 lesions, high-grade intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasia (IPMN)) were detected before the age of 50 years. Potentially relevant lesions (multifocal PanIN2 lesions, low/moderate-grade branch-duct IPMNs) occurred also significantly more often after the age of 50 years (13 vs 2, p<0.0004). The diagnostic yield of potentially relevant lesions was not different between screening protocols using annual MRI with EUS (n=98) or annual MRI with EUS every 3rd year (n=198) and between IAR screened at intervals of 12 months (n=180) or IAR that decided to be screened at ≥24 months intervals (n=30). CONCLUSIONS: It appears safe to start screening for PDAC in IAR of non-CDKN2a FPC families at the age of 50 years. MRI-based screening supplemented by EUS at baseline and every 3rd year or when changes in MRI occur appears to be efficient.

13 Article Circulating tumor cells (Ctc) and kras mutant circulating free Dna (cfdna) detection in peripheral blood as biomarkers in patients diagnosed with exocrine pancreatic cancer. 2015

Earl, Julie / Garcia-Nieto, Sandra / Martinez-Avila, Jose Carlos / Montans, José / Sanjuanbenito, Alfonso / Rodríguez-Garrote, Mercedes / Lisa, Eduardo / Mendía, Elena / Lobo, Eduardo / Malats, Núria / Carrato, Alfredo / Guillen-Ponce, Carmen. ·Medical Oncology Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, KM 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. julie.earl@live.co.uk. · Medical Oncology Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, KM 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. sandragarcianieto@hotmail.com. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish Cancer Research Cancer Center, Madrid, Spain. jcmartinezavila@gmail.com. · Pathology Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. jmontans@anatomia.e.telefonica.net. · Surgery Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. asanjuanbenito@gmail.com. · Medical Oncology Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, KM 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. mercedes3110@yahoo.es. · Surgery Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. edulisa@hotmail.com. · Surgery Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. mendiaelena@hotmail.com. · Surgery Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Madrid, Spain. eduardo.lobo@salud.madrid.org. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish Cancer Research Cancer Center, Madrid, Spain. nmalats@cnio.es. · Medical Oncology Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, KM 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. acarrato@telefonica.net. · Medical Oncology Department, Ramón y Cajal University Hospital, Carretera de Colmenar Viejo, KM 9,100, 28034, Madrid, Spain. carmenguillenponce@gmail.com. ·BMC Cancer · Pubmed #26498594.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Pancreatic cancer remains one of the most difficult cancers to treat with the poorest prognosis. The key to improving survival rates in this disease is early detection and monitoring of disseminated and residual disease. However, this is hindered due to lack reliable diagnostic and predictive markers which mean that the majority of patients succumb to their condition within a few months. METHODS: We present a pilot study of the detection circulating free DNA (cfDNA) combined with tumor specific mutation detection by digital PCR as a novel minimally invasive biomarker in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). This was compared to the detection of CTC by the CellSearch® system and a novel CTC enrichment strategy based on CD45 positive cell depletion. The aim of the study was to assess tumor specific DNA detection in plasma and CTC detection as prognostic markers in PDAC. RESULTS: We detected KRAS mutant cfDNA in 26% of patients of all stages and this correlated strongly with Overall Survival (OS), 60 days (95% CI: 19-317) for KRAS mutation positive vs 772 days for KRAS mutation negative (95% CI: 416-1127). Although, the presence of CTC detected by the CellSearch® system did correlate significantly with OS, 88 days (95% CI: 27-206) CTC positive vs 393 days CTC negative (95% CI: 284-501), CTC were detected in only 20% of patients, the majority of which had metastatic disease, whereas KRAS mutant cfDNA was detected in patients with both resectable and advanced disease. CONCLUSIONS: Tumor specific cfDNA detection and CTC detection are promising markers for the management of patients with PDAC, although there is a need to validate these results in a larger patient cohort and optimize the detection of CTC in PDAC by applying the appropriate markers for their detection.

14 Article PanGen-Fam: Spanish registry of hereditary pancreatic cancer. 2015

Mocci, E / Guillen-Ponce, C / Earl, J / Marquez, M / Solera, J / Salazar-López, M-T / Calcedo-Arnáiz, C / Vázquez-Sequeiros, E / Montans, J / Muñoz-Beltrán, M / Vicente-Bártulos, A / González-Gordaliza, C / Sanjuanbenito, A / Guerrero, C / Mendía, E / Lisa, E / Lobo, E / Martínez, J C / Real, F X / Malats, N / Carrato, A. ·Medical Oncology Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Genetic and Molecular Epidemiology Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain. · Molecular Oncogenetics Unit, Institute of Medical and Molecular Genetics, La Paz Hospital, Madrid, Spain. · Digestive Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Pathology Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Radiology Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Surgery Department, Ramon y Cajal University Hospital, IRYCIS, Madrid, Spain. · Epithelial Carcinogenesis Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid, Spain; Department de Ciències Experimentals i de la Salut, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Spain. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #26212471.

ABSTRACT: PURPOSE: To describe the organisation of the registry and the preliminary results in terms of characteristics of high-risk pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) families recruited to date and findings of the screening programme. To compare early onset sporadic cases (⩽50 years), sporadic cases (>50 years) and cases with family history of cancer, for PDAC possible risk factors. METHODS/PATIENTS: Families with hereditary cancer syndromes predisposing to PDAC were recruited from two main sources: Spanish hospitals participating in PanGenEU, a pan-European multicentre case-control study, and their genetic counseling unit. Individuals at high-risk of PDAC were enrolled into a screening programme, consisting of Endoscopic ultrasound, computerised tomography, magnetic resonance imaging. Genetic testing of candidate genes was offered according to each patient's risk. RESULTS: Among 577 consecutive PDAC cases, recruited via PanGenEU, 36 (6%) had ⩾2 first-degree relative with PDAC: Familial pancreatic cancer (FPC). So far PanGen-Fam has recruited 42 high-risk PDAC families; 25 (60%) had FPC. Five index cases with cancer were positive for BRCA2 and one for BRCA1 germline mutations. In the second year of prospective PDAC screening, one neuroendocrine tumour and a high-grade dysplasia lesion suspicious of carcinoma were diagnosed among 41 high-risk individuals. Furthermore EUS detected chronic-pancreatitis-like parenchymal changes in 15 patients. CONCLUDING STATEMENT: The identification and recruitment of PDAC high-risk families into the PanGen-Fam registry provides an opportunity to detect early onset cancer and precursor pancreatic cancer lesions at a potentially curative stage and to increase the knowledge of the natural history of the disease.