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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Ashley B. Grossman
Based on 10 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, A. Grossman wrote the following 10 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Guidelines for the management of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine (including carcinoid) tumours (NETs). 2012

Ramage, John K / Ahmed, A / Ardill, J / Bax, N / Breen, D J / Caplin, M E / Corrie, P / Davar, J / Davies, A H / Lewington, V / Meyer, T / Newell-Price, J / Poston, G / Reed, N / Rockall, A / Steward, W / Thakker, R V / Toubanakis, C / Valle, J / Verbeke, C / Grossman, A B / Anonymous3000709. ·Basingstoke and North Hampshire Hospital, Aldermaston Road, Basingstoke RG24 9NA, UK. john.ramage@bnhft.nhs.uk ·Gut · Pubmed #22052063.

ABSTRACT: These guidelines update previous guidance published in 2005. They have been revised by a group who are members of the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society with endorsement from the clinical committees of the British Society of Gastroenterology, the Society for Endocrinology, the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland (and its Surgical Specialty Associations), the British Society of Gastrointestinal and Abdominal Radiology and others. The authorship represents leaders of the various groups in the UK and Ireland Neuroendocrine Tumour Society, but a large amount of work has been carried out by other specialists, many of whom attended a guidelines conference in May 2009. We have attempted to represent this work in the acknowledgements section. Over the past few years, there have been advances in the management of neuroendocrine tumours, which have included clearer characterisation, more specific and therapeutically relevant diagnosis, and improved treatments. However, there remain few randomised trials in the field and the disease is uncommon, hence all evidence must be considered weak in comparison with other more common cancers.

2 Guideline ENETS Consensus Guidelines for the Standards of Care in Neuroendocrine Tumors: biochemical markers. 2009

O'Toole, Dermot / Grossman, Ashley / Gross, David / Delle Fave, Gianfranco / Barkmanova, Jaroslava / O'Connor, Juan / Pape, Ulrich-Frank / Plöckinger, Ursula / Anonymous990637 / Anonymous1000637. ·Department of Gastroentereology and Clinical Medicine, St. James's Hospital and Trinity College, Dublin 8, Ireland. otooled1@tcd.ie ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #19713711.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

3 Review Advanced neuroendocrine tumours of the small intestine and pancreas: clinical developments, controversies, and future strategies. 2018

Auernhammer, Christoph J / Spitzweg, Christine / Angele, Martin K / Boeck, Stefan / Grossman, Ashley / Nölting, Svenja / Ilhan, Harun / Knösel, Thomas / Mayerle, Julia / Reincke, Martin / Bartenstein, Peter. ·Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine 4, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. Electronic address: christoph.auernhammer@med.uni-muenchen.de. · Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine 4, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of General, Visceral, Transplantation, Vascular and Thoracic Surgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine 3, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Neuroendocrine Tumour Centre, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK. · Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Institute of Pathology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. · Interdisciplinary Center of Neuroendocrine Tumours of the GastroEnteroPancreatic System, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany; Department of Internal Medicine 2, Klinikum der Universitaet Muenchen, Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Munich, Germany. ·Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol · Pubmed #29229497.

ABSTRACT: In this Review, we discuss clinical developments and controversies in the treatment of neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) that are relevant for clinicians and clinical researchers. We describe advances in genetics, blood-based biomarkers, functional imaging, and systemic therapy of advanced NETs and discuss results of recent phase 3 studies, systemic treatment of advanced disease with peptide receptor radionuclide therapy, biotherapy, chemotherapy, and molecularly targeted therapy, and the potential role of immunotherapy in the treatment of NETs. Suggested treatment algorithms for NETs of ileal or jejunal origin and of pancreatic origin are presented.

4 Review Medical management of secretory syndromes related to gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2016

Dimitriadis, Georgios K / Weickert, Martin O / Randeva, Harpal S / Kaltsas, Gregory / Grossman, Ashley. ·The Arden NET CoEWarwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK Division of Translational and Experimental MedicineWarwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Division of Endocrinology and Investigative MedicineImperial College London, Hammersmith Campus, London, UK g.dimitriadis@warwick.ac.uk. · The Arden NET CoEWarwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK Division of Translational and Experimental MedicineWarwick Medical School, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK Centre for Applied Biological and Exercise SciencesCoventry University, Coventry, UK. · The Arden NET CoEWarwickshire Institute for the Study of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University Hospitals of Coventry and Warwickshire NHS Trust, Coventry, UK Division of PathophysiologyNational and Kapodistrian University of Athens Medical School, Athens, Greece Oxford Center for DiabetesEndocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. · Oxford Center for DiabetesEndocrinology and Metabolism, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #27461388.

ABSTRACT: Although recent epidemiological evidence indicates that the prevalence of non-functioning gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) is rising, a significant number of GEP-NETs still present with symptoms related to the secretion of biologically active substances leading to the development of distinct clinical syndromes. In the past, these syndromes were associated with substantial morbidity and mortality due to the lack of specific therapies; however, since the introduction of long-acting somatostatin analogues and medications such as proton pump inhibitors, their control has been greatly improved. As a result, nowadays, the main cause of morbidity and mortality in GEP-NETs is mostly directly related to tumour growth and the extent of metastatic disease. However, in some patients with functioning tumours and extensive disease, control of the secretory syndrome still remains problematic, necessitating the employment of several cytoreductive techniques, which may not always be sufficient. Recently, new agents directed against tumour growth, or exerting increased binding activity to receptors expressed in these tumours, or interfering with the synthetic pathway of some of the compounds secreted by these tumours, have been developed. Since there are no specific guidelines addressing the totality of the management of the secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs, this review aims at critically analysing the medical management of previously recognised secretory syndromes; it also addresses areas of uncertainty, assesses the newer therapeutic developments and also addresses recently described but poorly characterised secretory syndromes related to GEP-NETs.

5 Review Are neuroendocrine tumours a feature of tuberous sclerosis? A systematic review. 2009

Dworakowska, Dorota / Grossman, Ashley B. ·Barts and the London School of Medicine, Centre for Endocrinology, London EC1M 6BQ, UK. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #18978035.

ABSTRACT: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant multisystem disorder characterised by the development of multiple hamartomas in numerous organs. It is caused by mutations of two tumour suppressor genes, TSC1 on chromosome 9q34 and TSC2 on chromosome 16p13.3, which encode for hamartin and tuberin respectively. The interaction between these two proteins, the tuberin-hamartin complex, has been shown to be critical to multiple intracellular signalling pathways, especially those controlling cell growth and proliferation. TSC may affect skin, central nervous system, kidneys, heart, eyes, blood vessels, lung, bone and gastrointestinal tract. Small series and case reports have documented that in tuberous sclerosis patients many endocrine system alterations might occur, affecting the function of the pituitary, parathyroid and other neuroendocrine tissue. There have been scattered reports of the involvement of such tissue in the pathological process of TSC, but no systematic review as to whether this is a true association. We have therefore systematically assessed all available published literature in this area. We conclude that there may be an association with pituitary and parathyroid tumours, and two recent descriptions of Cushing's disease are especially intriguing. However, the evidence seems more firm in the case of islet cell tumours, particularly insulinomas. As these latter may cause changes in mental state that may be confused with the cerebral manifestations of TSC per se, it is particularly important for physicians working with these patients to be aware of the putative and indeed likely association.

6 Article Neurofibromatosis Type 1 and pancreatic islet cell tumours: an association which should be recognized. 2015

Rogers, A / Wang, L M / Karavitaki, N / Grossman, A B. ·From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, OX3 7LE, UK and Department of Histopathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK. · From the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, Radcliffe Department of Medicine, Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, OX3 7LE, UK and Department of Histopathology, John Radcliffe Hospital, University of Oxford, OX3 9DU, UK ashley.grossman@ocdem.ox.ac.uk. ·QJM · Pubmed #23173186.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

7 Article The nuclear option for insulinomas. 2013

Grossman, Ashley. ·Churchill Hospital, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LE, UK. Electronic address: ashley.grossman@ocdem.ox.ac.uk. ·Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol · Pubmed #24622306.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

8 Article Diagnosis and localisation of insulinoma: the value of modern magnetic resonance imaging in conjunction with calcium stimulation catheterisation. 2010

Druce, Maralyn R / Muthuppalaniappan, Vasantha M / O'Leary, Benjamin / Chew, Shern L / Drake, William M / Monson, John P / Akker, Scott A / Besser, Michael / Sahdev, Anju / Rockall, Andrea / Vyas, Soumil / Bhattacharya, Satya / Matson, Matthew / Berney, Daniel / Reznek, R H / Grossman, Ashley B. ·Department of Endocrinology, Barts and the London Medical School, St Bartholomew's Hospital, London, UK. maralyn.druce@bartsandthelondon.nhs.uk ·Eur J Endocrinol · Pubmed #20207727.

ABSTRACT: CONTEXT: Preoperative localisation of insulinoma improves cure rate and reduces complications, but may be challenging. OBJECTIVE: To review diagnostic features and localisation accuracy for insulinomas. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, retrospective analysis. SETTING: A single tertiary referral centre. PATIENTS: Patients with insulinoma in the years 1990-2009, including sporadic tumours and those in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were identified from a database, and case notes and investigation results were reviewed. Tumour localisation by computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), octreotide scanning, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and calcium stimulation was evaluated. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Insulinoma localisation was compared to histologically confirmed location following surgical excision. RESULTS: Thirty-seven instances of biochemically and/or histologically proven insulinoma were identified in 36 patients, of which seven were managed medically. Of the 30 treated surgically, 25 had CT (83.3%) and 28 had MRI (90.3%), with successful localisation in 16 (64%) by CT and 21 (75%) by MRI respectively. Considered together, such imaging correctly localised 80% of lesions. Radiolabelled octreotide scanning was positive in 10 out of 20 cases (50%); EUS correctly identified 17 lesions in 26 patients (65.4%). Twenty-seven patients had calcium stimulation testing, of which 6 (22%) did not localise, 17 (63%) were correctly localised, and 4 (15%) gave discordant or confusing results. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative localisation of insulinomas remains challenging. A pragmatic combination of CT and especially MRI predicts tumour localisation with high accuracy. Radionuclide imaging and EUS were less helpful but may be valuable in selected cases. Calcium stimulation currently remains useful in providing an additional functional perspective.

9 Article Diagnosis of insulinoma in a patient with hypoglycemia without obvious hyperinsulinemia. 2009

Coelho, Catarina / Druce, Maralyn R / Grossman, Ashley B. ·Endocrinology Department of Garcia de Orta Hospital, Almada, Portugal. ·Nat Rev Endocrinol · Pubmed #19844250.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A 41-year-old Maltese woman with a 12-month history of severe, morning episodes of confusion, blurred vision and sweating was referred to a specialist center for evaluation of fasting hypoglycemia. She was not taking medication and did not report any prior personal or familial history of endocrinopathy or other relevant pathology. INVESTIGATIONS: Measurement of plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and beta-hydroxybutyrate concentrations during a prolonged supervised fast; sulfonylurea screen; CT, MRI scan and endoscopic ultrasonography of the pancreas; calcium stimulation test; surgical exploration and intra-operative ultrasonography of the pancreas. DIAGNOSIS: Insulin-secreting lesion (insulinoma) in the tail of the pancreas. MANAGEMENT: The tumor was resected with cure of symptoms.

10 Minor Diagnostic accuracy of an "amended" insulin-glucose ratio for the biochemical diagnosis of insulinomas. 2013

Cryer, Philip E / Axelrod, Lloyd / Grossman, Ashley B / Heller, Simon R / Seaquist, Elizabeth R / Service, F John / Anonymous4660754. · ·Ann Intern Med · Pubmed #23552360.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --