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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Arjan W. Griffioen
Based on 3 articles published since 2010
(Why 3 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Arjan W. Griffioen wrote the following 3 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Exploration of the platelet proteome in patients with early-stage cancer. 2018

Sabrkhany, Siamack / Kuijpers, Marijke J E / Knol, Jaco C / Olde Damink, Steven W M / Dingemans, Anne-Marie C / Verheul, Henk M / Piersma, Sander R / Pham, Thang V / Griffioen, Arjan W / Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A / Jimenez, Connie R. ·Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Physiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Biochemistry, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · OncoProteomics Laboratory, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Department of Pulmonology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Angiogenesis Laboratory, Department of Medical Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · OncoProteomics Laboratory, Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Electronic address: c.jimenez@vumc.nl. ·J Proteomics · Pubmed #29432918.

ABSTRACT: Platelets play an important role in tumor growth and, at the same time, platelet characteristics are affected by cancer presence. Therefore, we investigated whether the platelet proteome harbors differentially expressed proteins associated with early-stage cancer. For this proof-of-concept study, patients with early-stage lung (n = 8) or head of pancreas cancer (n = 4) were included, as were healthy sex- and age-matched controls for both subgroups. Blood samples were collected from controls and from patients before surgery. Furthermore, from six of the patients, a second sample was collected two months after surgery. NanoLC-MS/MS-based proteomics of gel-fractionated platelet proteins was used for comparative spectral count analyses of patients to controls and before to after surgery samples. The total platelet proteome dataset included 4384 unique proteins of which 85 were significantly (criteria Fc > 1.5 and p < 0.05) changed in early-stage cancer compared to controls. In addition, the levels of 81 platelet proteins normalized after tumor resection. When filtering for the most discriminatory proteins, we identified seven promising platelet proteins associated with early-stage cancer. In conclusion, this pioneering study on the platelet proteome in cancer patients clearly identifies platelets as a new source of candidate protein biomarkers of early-stage cancer. BIOLOGICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, most blood-based diagnostics/biomarker research is performed in serum or plasma, while the content of blood cells is usually neglected. It is known that especially blood platelets, which are the main circulating pool of many bioactive proteins, such as growth factors, chemokines, and cytokines, are a potentially rich source of biomarkers. The current study is the first to measure the effect of early-stage cancer on the platelet proteome of patients. Our study demonstrates that the platelet proteome of patients with early-stage lung or head of pancreas cancer differs considerably compared to that of healthy individuals of matched sex and age. In addition, the platelet proteome of cancer patients normalized after surgical resection of the tumor. Exploiting platelet proteome differences linked to both tumor presence and disease status, we were able to demonstrate that the platelet proteome can be mined for potential biomarkers of cancer.

2 Article A combination of platelet features allows detection of early-stage cancer. 2017

Sabrkhany, Siamack / Kuijpers, Marijke J E / van Kuijk, Sander M J / Sanders, Linda / Pineda, Sharo / Olde Damink, Steven W M / Dingemans, Anne-Marie C / Griffioen, Arjan W / Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A. ·Department of Physiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Biochemistry, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Medical Technology Assessment, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Pulmonology, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. · Department of Medical Oncology, Angiogenesis Laboratory, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Physiology, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht University Medical Center+, Maastricht, The Netherlands. Electronic address: m.oudeegbrink@maastrichtuniversity.nl. ·Eur J Cancer · Pubmed #28527393.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Detection of early-stage cancer significantly improves patient survival. As platelets play an important role in cancer progression, we aimed to investigate whether platelets can be used for the discovery of early-stage cancer. METHODS: Patients with lung (n = 86) or head of pancreas (n = 42) cancer were included, as were healthy sex- and age-matched controls (n = 92). Blood was collected before initiation of treatment. Platelet count, volume and activation status were quantified in whole blood. Next, concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, platelet factor 4, thrombospondin-1 and connective tissue-activating peptide III were measured in both platelets and plasma. Using the results, two multivariable diagnostic models were developed and internally validated. FINDINGS: Multiple platelet features, including platelet count, volume and protein content, were significantly changed in lung and head of pancreas cancer patients. However, the pattern of changes differed between both groups. The diagnostic model developed for lung cancer discriminated very well between patients and controls (AUC = 88.7%). Addition of smoking as a variable significantly increased the AUC of the model to 94.5%. The diagnostic model for head of pancreas cancer also performed well (AUC = 82.7%). Both models were internally validated, resulting in optimism-corrected AUC's of 86.8% and 80.8%, respectively. INTERPRETATION: In patients with lung or head of pancreas cancer, several platelet characteristics are changed compared to healthy sex- and age-matched controls. A cancer type-specific combination of these platelet features can be used to discriminate between patients with early-stage cancer and healthy individuals.

3 Article Development of bioluminescent chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) models for primary pancreatic cancer cells: a platform for drug testing. 2017

Rovithi, Maria / Avan, Amir / Funel, Niccola / Leon, Leticia G / Gomez, Valentina E / Wurdinger, Thomas / Griffioen, Arjan W / Verheul, Henk M W / Giovannetti, Elisa. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Department of Internal Medicine, Agios Nikolaos General Hospital, Agios Nikolaos, Crete, Greece. · Molecular Medicine Group, Department of Modern Sciences and Technologies; School of Medicine, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran. · Cancer Pharmacology Lab, AIRC Start-Up Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy. · Department of Neurosurgery, Cancer Center Amsterdam, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. · Molecular Neurogenetics Unit, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Neuroscience Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, US. ·Sci Rep · Pubmed #28304379.

ABSTRACT: The aim of the present study was to develop chick-embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) bioluminescent tumor models employing low passage cell cultures obtained from primary pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Primary PDAC cells transduced with lentivirus expressing Firefly-luciferase (Fluc) were established and inoculated onto the CAM membrane, with >80% engraftment. Fluc signal reliably correlated with tumor growth. Tumor features were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and genetic analyses, including analysis of mutations and mRNA expression of PDAC pivotal genes, as well as microRNA (miRNA) profiling. These studies showed that CAM tumors had histopathological and genetic characteristic comparable to the original tumors. We subsequently tested the modulation of key miRNAs and the activity of gemcitabine and crizotinib on CAM tumors, showing that combination treatment resulted in 63% inhibition of tumor growth as compared to control (p < 0.01). These results were associated with reduced expression of miR-21 and increased expression of miR-155. Our study provides the first evidence that transduced primary PDAC cells can form tumors on the CAM, retaining several histopathological and (epi)genetic characteristics of original tumors. Moreover, our results support the use of these models for drug testing, providing insights on molecular mechanisms underlying antitumor activity of new drugs/combinations.