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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Celia Greenwood
Based on 2 articles published since 2009
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, Celia Greenwood wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Article Association between Variants in Atopy-Related Immunologic Candidate Genes and Pancreatic Cancer Risk. 2015

Cotterchio, Michelle / Lowcock, Elizabeth / Bider-Canfield, Zoe / Lemire, Mathieu / Greenwood, Celia / Gallinger, Steven / Hudson, Thomas. ·Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON M5G 2L7, Canada; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5T 3M7, Canada. · Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, ON M5G 2L7, Canada. · Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON M5G 0A3, Canada. · Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC H3T 1E2, Canada. · Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON M5G 1X5, Canada; Division of General Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, ON M5G 2C4, Canada. · Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, ON M5G 0A3, Canada; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 1A1, Canada. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #25945796.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many epidemiology studies report that atopic conditions such as allergies are associated with reduced pancreas cancer risk. The reason for this relationship is not yet understood. This is the first study to comprehensively evaluate the association between variants in atopy-related candidate genes and pancreatic cancer risk. METHODS: A population-based case-control study of pancreas cancer cases diagnosed during 2011-2012 (via Ontario Cancer Registry), and controls recruited using random digit dialing utilized DNA from 179 cases and 566 controls. Following an exhaustive literature review, SNPs in 180 candidate genes were pre-screened using dbGaP pancreas cancer GWAS data; 147 SNPs in 56 allergy-related immunologic genes were retained and genotyped. Logistic regression was used to estimate age-adjusted odd ratio (AOR) for each variant and false discovery rate was used to adjust Wald p-values for multiple testing. Subsequently, a risk allele score was derived based on statistically significant variants. RESULTS: 18 SNPs in 14 candidate genes (CSF2, DENND1B, DPP10, FLG, IL13, IL13RA2, LRP1B, NOD1, NPSR1, ORMDL3, RORA, STAT4, TLR6, TRA) were significantly associated with pancreas cancer risk. After adjustment for multiple comparisons, two LRP1B SNPs remained statistically significant; for example, LRP1B rs1449477 (AA vs. CC: AOR=0.37, 95% CI: 0.22-0.62; p (adjusted)=0.04). Furthermore, the risk allele score was associated with a significant reduction in pancreas cancer risk (p=0.0007). CONCLUSIONS: Preliminary findings suggest certain atopy-related variants may be associated with pancreas cancer risk. Further studies are needed to replicate this, and to elucidate the biology behind the growing body of epidemiologic evidence suggesting allergies may reduce pancreatic cancer risk.

2 Article Association between allergies and risk of pancreatic cancer. 2014

Cotterchio, Michelle / Lowcock, Elizabeth / Hudson, Thomas J / Greenwood, Celia / Gallinger, Steven. ·Authors' Affiliations: Prevention and Cancer Control, Cancer Care Ontario; Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto; Departments of Medical Biophysics and Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto; Ontario Institute for Cancer Research; Lunenfeld-Tanenbaum Research Institute, Mount Sinai Hospital; and Division of General Surgery, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario; and Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada. ·Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev · Pubmed #24554712.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Less than 10% of pancreatic cancer cases survive 5 years, yet its etiology is not well understood. Studies suggest allergies are associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk. Our study collected additional information on allergies (including skin prick test results and differentiation of allergic/nonallergic asthma), and is the first to assess possible confounding by allergy medications. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was designed to comprehensively assess the association between allergy and pancreatic cancer risk. Pancreas cancer cases were diagnosed during 2011 to 2012, and identified through the Ontario Cancer Registry (345 cases). Population-based controls were identified using random digit dialing and age/sex frequency matched to cases (1,285 controls). Questionnaires collected lifetime allergy history (type of allergy, age at onset, skin prick testing results), allergy medications, and established pancreas cancer risk factors. Logistic regression was used to estimate odd ratios and test potential confounders, including allergy medications. RESULTS: Hay fever was associated with a significant reduction in pancreatic cancer risk [AOR = 0.68; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.52-0.89], and reduction was greatest for those whose skin prick test was positive for hay fever allergens. No particular patterns were observed as regards age at onset and duration of allergy. Positive dust/mold allergy skin prick test and animal allergies were associated with a statistically significant reduced pancreatic cancer risk; AOR = 0.49; 95% CI, 0.31-0.78 and AOR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.46-0.99, respectively. Asthma was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk. CONCLUSIONS/IMPACT: These findings support the growing body of evidence that suggests certain allergies are associated with reduced pancreatic cancer risk.