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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Henning Grønbaek
Based on 8 articles published since 2010
(Why 8 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, H. Grønbæk wrote the following 8 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline Nordic guidelines 2014 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms. 2014

Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Sorbye, Halfdan / Welin, Staffan / Federspiel, Birgitte / Grønbæk, Henning / Hellman, Per / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Mortensen, Jann / Schalin-Jäntti, Camilla / Sundin, Anders / Sundlöv, Anna / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Knigge, Ulrich. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University , Uppsala , Sweden * ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #25140861.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has undergone major recent advances and new methods are currently introduced into the clinic. An update of the WHO classification has resulted in a new nomenclature dividing NENs into neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) including G1 (Ki67 index ≤ 2%) and G2 (Ki67 index 3-20%) tumours and neuroendocrine carcinomas (NECs) with Ki67 index > 20%, G3. Aim. These Nordic guidelines summarise the Nordic Neuroendocrine Tumour Group's current view on how to diagnose and treat NEN-patients and are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling these patients.

2 Guideline Nordic Guidelines 2010 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours. 2010

Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Sørbye, Halfdan / Welin, Staffan / Federspiel, Birgitte / Grønbaek, Henning / Hellman, Per / Mathisen, Oystein / Mortensen, Jann / Sundin, Anders / Thiis-Evensen, Espen / Välimäki, Matti J / Oberg, Kjell / Knigge, Ulrich. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. Tiensuu_Janson@medsci.uu.se ·Acta Oncol · Pubmed #20553100.

ABSTRACT: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine tumours has undergone a major change during the last decade. New diagnostic possibilities and treatment options have been developed. These Nordic guidelines, written by a group with a major interest in the subject, summarises our current view on how to diagnose and treat these patients. The guidelines are meant to be useful in the daily practice for clinicians handling patients with neuroendocrine tumours.

3 Article The Risk of Second Primary Colorectal Adenocarcinomas Is Not Increased among Patients with Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: A Nationwide Population-Based Study. 2018

Stemann Lau, Tobias / Dam, Gitte / Jepsen, Peter / Grønbæk, Henning / Krogh, Klaus / Gregersen, Tine. ·Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmarktobilu@rm.dk. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Nuclear Medicine and PET Centre, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. ·Neuroendocrinology · Pubmed #30092588.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Second primary colorectal adenocarcinomas (SPCA) may occur with a higher frequency in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs). In a nationwide population-based study, we investigated the risk of SPCA in GEP-NEN patients and compared it to the general population. METHODS: Using the nationwide Danish registries, we identified 2,831 GEP-NEN patients (median age 63 years [IQR 50-73 years], 53% women) diagnosed in 1995-2010. We used Cox regression to compare the incidence of SPCA in GEP-NEN patients relative to a gender- and age-matched general population sample of 56,044 persons. RESULTS: We observed 20 SPCAs among the 2,831 GEP-NEN patients with a total time at risk of 14,003 years (incidence = 143 per 100,000 person-years) and 770 colorectal adenocarcinomas in the general population of 56,044 persons with a total time at risk of 466,801 years (incidence = 165 per 100,000 person-years). The hazard ratio (HR) of SPCA from GEP-NEN diagnosis to the end of follow-up was 1.22 (95% CI: 0.78-1.92) in GEP-NEN patients compared to the general population. This nonsignificant association was the result of a strong positive association in the first 6 months after diagnosis of GEP-NEN (HR = 9.43 [95% CI: 4.98-17.86]) followed by a negative association in the remainder of the follow-up period (HR = 0.50 [95% CI: 0.20-1.21]). CONCLUSION: In this population-based study, there was no increased risk of SPCA among GEP-NEN patients. The clinical workup in newly diagnosed GEP-NEN patients likely explains the positive short-term association followed by a negative association.

4 Article Intravenous versus oral etoposide: efficacy and correlation to clinical outcome in patients with high-grade metastatic gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (WHO G3). 2018

Ali, Abir Salwa / Grönberg, Malin / Langer, Seppo W / Ladekarl, Morten / Hjortland, Geir Olav / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Österlund, Pia / Welin, Staffan / Grønbæk, Henning / Knigge, Ulrich / Sorbye, Halfdan / Janson, Eva Tiensuu. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. abir.ali@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital and Tampere University, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Helsinki, Finland. · Departments of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Med Oncol · Pubmed #29511910.

ABSTRACT: High-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NENs, G3) are aggressive cancers of the digestive system with poor prognosis and survival. Platinum-based chemotherapy (cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide) is considered the first-line palliative treatment. Etoposide is frequently administered intravenously; however, oral etoposide may be used as an alternative. Concerns for oral etoposide include decreased bioavailability, inter- and intra-patient variability and patient compliance. We aimed to evaluate possible differences in progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients treated with oral etoposide compared to etoposide given as infusion. Patients (n = 236) from the Nordic NEC study were divided into three groups receiving etoposide as a long infusion (24 h, n = 170), short infusion (≤ 5 h, n = 33) or oral etoposide (n = 33) according to hospital tradition. PFS and OS were analyzed with Kaplan-Meier (log-rank), cox proportional hazard ratios and confidence intervals. No statistical differences were observed in PFS or OS when comparing patients receiving long infusion (median PFS 3.8 months, median OS 14.5 months), short infusion (PFS 5.6 months, OS 11.0 months) or oral etoposide (PFS 5.4 months, OS 11.3 months). We observed equal efficacy for the three administration routes suggesting oral etoposide may be safe and efficient in treating high-grade GEP-NEN, G3 patients scheduled for cisplatin/carboplatin + etoposide therapy.

5 Article Expression of p53 protein in high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma. 2017

Ali, Abir Salwa / Grönberg, Malin / Federspiel, Birgitte / Scoazec, Jean-Yves / Hjortland, Geir Olav / Grønbæk, Henning / Ladekarl, Morten / Langer, Seppo W / Welin, Staffan / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Arola, Johanna / Österlund, Pia / Knigge, Ulrich / Sorbye, Halfdan / Grimelius, Lars / Janson, Eva Tiensuu. ·Department of Medical Sciences, Section of Endocrine Oncology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Biopathology, Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif, France. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepatology & Gastroenterology, Aarhus university Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. · Pathology, HUSLAB, University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Hospital and Helsinki University, Helsinki Finland. · Department of Oncology, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. · Department of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, Faculty of Health Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital and Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. ·PLoS One · Pubmed #29112960.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NECs) are aggressive, rapidly proliferating tumors. Therapeutic response to current chemotherapy regimens is usually short lasting. The aim of this study was to examine the expression and potential clinical importance of immunoreactive p53 protein in GEP-NEC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Tumor tissues from 124 GEP-NEC patients with locally advanced or metastatic disease treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were collected from Nordic centers and clinical data were obtained from the Nordic NEC register. Tumor proliferation rate and differentiation were re-evaluated. All specimens were immunostained for p53 protein using a commercially available monoclonal antibody. Kaplan-Meier curves and cox regression analyses were used to assess progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). RESULTS: All tumor tissues were immunoreactive for either one or both neuroendocrine biomarkers (chromogranin A and synaptophysin) and Ki67 index was >20% in all cases. p53 immunoreactivity was only shown in 39% of the cases and was not found to be a prognostic marker for the whole cohort. However, p53 immunoreactivity was correlated with shorter PFS in patients with colorectal tumors (HR = 2.1, p = 0.03) in a univariate analysis as well as to poorer PFS (HR = 2.6, p = 0.03) and OS (HR = 3.4, p = 0.02) in patients with colorectal tumors with distant metastases, a correlation which remained significant in the multivariate analyses. CONCLUSION: In this cohort of GEP-NEC patients, p53 expression could not be correlated with clinical outcome. However, in patients with colorectal NECs, p53 expression was correlated with shorter PFS and OS. Further studies are needed to establish the role of immunoreactive p53 as a prognostic marker for GEP-NEC patients.

6 Article Results after surgical treatment of liver metastases in patients with high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas. 2017

Galleberg, R B / Knigge, U / Tiensuu Janson, E / Vestermark, L W / Haugvik, S-P / Ladekarl, M / Langer, S W / Grønbæk, H / Österlund, P / Hjortland, G O / Assmus, J / Tang, L / Perren, A / Sorbye, H. ·Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: renate.berget.galleberg@helse-bergen.no. · Departments of Surgery C and Endocrinology PE, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: rxs484@ku.dk. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden. Electronic address: eva.tiensuu_janson@medsci.uu.se. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: lene.vestermark@syd.dk. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: mortlade@rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address: swlanger@dadlnet.dk. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Electronic address: henning.gronbaek@aarhus.rm.dk. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. Electronic address: pia.osterlund@pshp.fi. · Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, Norway. Electronic address: goo@ous-hf.no. · Center for Clinical Research, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: jorg.assmus@helse-bergen.no. · Department of Pathology, MSKCC, New York, USA. Electronic address: tangl@MSKCC.ORG. · Department of Pathology, University of Bern, Switzerland. Electronic address: aurel.perren@pathology.unibe.ch. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway; Department of Clinical Science, University of Bergen, Norway. Electronic address: Halfdan.sorbye@helse-bergen.no. ·Eur J Surg Oncol · Pubmed #28522174.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine carcinomas (GEP-NEC) are generally characterized by synchronous metastases, high aggressiveness and a dismal prognosis. Current international guidelines do not recommend surgical treatment of liver metastases, however the existing data are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the results of curatively intended resection/radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of liver metastases in patients with metastatic GEP-NEC. METHODS: 32 patients with a diagnosis of high-grade gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm (Ki-67 > 20%) and with intended curative resection/RFA of liver metastases, were identified among 840 patients from two Nordic GEP-NEC registries. Tumor morphology (well vs poor differentiation) was reassessed. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analyses for the entire cohort and for subgroups. RESULTS: Median OS after resection/RFA of liver metastases was 35.9 months (95%-CI: 20.6-51.3) with a five-year OS of 43%. The median PFS was 8.4 months (95%-CI: 3.9-13). Four patients (13%) were disease-free after 5 years. Two patients had well-differentiated morphology (NET G3) and 20 patients (63%) had Ki-67 ≥ 55%. A Ki-67 < 55% and receiving adjuvant chemotherapy were statistically significant factors of improved OS after liver resection/RFA. CONCLUSION: This study shows a long median and long term survival after liver surgery/RFA for these selected metastatic GEP-NEC patients, particularly for the group with a Ki-67 in the relatively lower G3 range. Our findings indicate a possible role for surgical treatment of liver metastases in the management of this patient population.

7 Article Surgical Treatment as a Principle for Patients with High-Grade Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Carcinoma: A Nordic Multicenter Comparative Study. 2016

Haugvik, Sven-Petter / Janson, Eva Tiensuu / Österlund, Pia / Langer, Seppo W / Falk, Ragnhild Sørum / Labori, Knut Jørgen / Vestermark, Lene Weber / Grønbæk, Henning / Gladhaug, Ivar Prydz / Sorbye, Halfdan. ·Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. sphaugvik@yahoo.de. · Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · Department of Oncology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. · Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. · Oslo Centre for Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Surgery, Rikshospitalet, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark. · Department of Hepatology and Gastroenterology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. · Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. · Department of Oncology, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway. ·Ann Surg Oncol · Pubmed #26678407.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: This study aimed to evaluate the role of surgery for patients with high-grade pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinoma (hgPNEC) in a large Nordic multicenter cohort study. Prior studies evaluating the role of surgery for patients with hgPNEC are limited, and the benefit of the surgery is uncertain. METHODS: Data from patients with a diagnosis of hgPNEC determined between 1998 and 2012 were retrospectively registered at 10 Nordic university hospitals. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the overall survival of different treatment groups, and Cox-regression analysis was used to evaluate factors potentially influencing survival. RESULTS: The study registered 119 patients. The median survival period from the time of metastasis was 23 months for patients undergoing initial resection of localized nonmetastatic disease and chemotherapy at the time of recurrence (n = 14), 29 months for patients undergoing resection of the primary tumor and resection/radiofrequency ablation of synchronous metastatic liver disease (n = 12), and 13 months for patients with synchronous metastatic disease given systemic chemotherapy alone (n = 78). The 3-year survival rate after surgery of the primary tumor and metastatic disease was 69 %. Resection of the primary tumor was an independent factor for improved survival after occurrence of metastatic disease. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with resected localized nonmetastatic hgPNEC and later metastatic disease seemed to benefit from initial resection of the primary tumor. Patients selected for resection of the primary tumor and synchronous liver metastases had a high 3-year survival rate. Selected patients with both localized hgPNEC and metastatic hgPNEC should be considered for radical surgical treatment.

8 Article Concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 and pancreatic cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. 2012

Rohrmann, S / Grote, V A / Becker, S / Rinaldi, S / Tjønneland, A / Roswall, N / Grønbæk, H / Overvad, K / Boutron-Ruault, M C / Clavel-Chapelon, F / Racine, A / Teucher, B / Boeing, H / Drogan, D / Dilis, V / Lagiou, P / Trichopoulou, A / Palli, D / Tagliabue, G / Tumino, R / Vineis, P / Mattiello, A / Rodríguez, L / Duell, E J / Molina-Montes, E / Dorronsoro, M / Huerta, J-M / Ardanaz, E / Jeurnink, S / Peeters, P H M / Lindkvist, B / Johansen, D / Sund, M / Ye, W / Khaw, K-T / Wareham, N J / Allen, N E / Crowe, F L / Fedirko, V / Jenab, M / Michaud, D S / Norat, T / Riboli, E / Bueno-de-Mesquita, H B / Kaaks, R. ·Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Prevention, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Zurich, Hirschengraben 84, Zürich 8001, Switzerland. sabine.rohrmann@ifspm.uzh.ch ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22315049.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (BPs) regulate cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis, and may have a role in the aetiology of various cancers. Information on their role in pancreatic cancer is limited and was examined here in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. METHODS: Serum concentrations of IGF-I and IGFBP-3 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in 422 cases and 422 controls matched on age, sex, study centre, recruitment date, and time since last meal. Conditional logistic regression was used to compute odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusted for confounding variables. RESULTS: Neither circulating levels of IGF-I (OR=1.21, 95% CI 0.75-1.93 for top vs bottom quartile, P-trend 0.301), IGFBP-3 (OR=1.00, 95% CI 0.66-1.51, P-trend 0.79), nor the molar IGF-I/IGFBP-3 ratio, an indicator of free IGF-I level (OR=1.22, 95% CI 0.75-1.97, P-trend 0.27), were statistically significantly associated with the risk of pancreatic cancer. In a cross-classification, however, a high concentration of IGF-I with concurrently low levels of IGFBP-3 was related to an increased risk of pancreatic cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI 1.05-2.83; P-interaction=0.154). CONCLUSION: On the basis of these results, circulating levels of components of the IGF axis do not appear to be the risk factors for pancreatic cancer. However, on the basis of the results of a subanalysis, it cannot be excluded that a relatively large amount of IGF-1 together with very low levels of IGFBP-3 might still be associated with an increase in pancreatic cancer risk.