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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Tamas Adam Gonda
Based on 14 articles published since 2008
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Between 2008 and 2019, Tamas Gonda wrote the following 14 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Guideline ACR Appropriateness Criteria 2017

Anonymous7930925 / Qayyum, Aliya / Tamm, Eric P / Kamel, Ihab R / Allen, Peter J / Arif-Tiwari, Hina / Chernyak, Victoria / Gonda, Tamas A / Grajo, Joseph R / Hindman, Nicole M / Horowitz, Jeanne M / Kaur, Harmeet / McNamara, Michelle M / Noto, Richard B / Srivastava, Pavan K / Lalani, Tasneem. ·Principal Author, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Electronic address: aqayyum@mdanderson.org. · Research Author, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · Panel Chair, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland. · Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York; American College of Surgeons. · University of Arizona, Banner University Medical Center, Tucson, Arizona. · Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York. · Columbia University, New York, New York; American Gastroenterological Association. · University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida. · New York University Medical Center, New York, New York. · Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois. · University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. · University of Alabama Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. · The Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island. · University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois; American College of Physicians. · Specialty Chair, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington. ·J Am Coll Radiol · Pubmed #29101993.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is associated with poor overall prognosis. Complete surgical resection is the only possible option for cure. As such, increasingly complex surgical techniques including sophisticated vascular reconstruction are being used. Continued advances in surgical techniques, in conjunction with use of combination systemic therapies, and radiation therapy have been suggested to improve outcomes. A key aspect to surgical success is reporting of pivotal findings beyond absence of distant metastases, such as tumor size, location, and degree of tumor involvement of specific vessels associated with potential perineural tumor spread. Multiphase contrast-enhanced multidetector CT and MRI are the imaging modalities of choice for pretreatment staging and presurgical determination of resectability. Imaging modalities such as endoscopic ultrasound and fluorine-18-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose imaging with PET/CT are indicated for specific scenarios such as biopsy guidance and confirmation of distant metastases, respectively. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment.

2 Review The Use of Biomarkers in the Risk Stratification of Cystic Neoplasms. 2018

Kaplan, Jeremy H / Gonda, Tamas A. ·Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. · Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: tg2214@cumc.columbia.edu. ·Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am · Pubmed #30241643.

ABSTRACT: Cyst fluid biomarkers may be used to identify pancreatic cyst subtypes. Biomarkers are selected based on their ability to accurately distinguish mucinous from nonmucinous cysts and to risk stratify cysts based on malignant potential. Biomarkers of interest include but are not limited to amylase, oncogenes, DNA analysis, and epigenetic markers. The introduction of next-generation sequencing and molecular panels has aided in improved diagnostic accuracy and risk stratification. This review presents the diagnostic performance of currently available biomarkers and proposes an algorithm to incorporate their use in the diagnosis of pancreatic cysts.

3 Review Endoscopic Ultrasonography with Fine-needle Aspiration: New Techniques for Interpretation of Endoscopic Ultrasonography Cytology and Histology Specimens. 2017

Haghighi, Mehrvash / Packey, Christopher / Gonda, Tamas A. ·Department of Pathology, Columbia University Medical Center, 161, Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10023, USA. · Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, 161, Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10023, USA. · Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University, 161, Fort Washington Avenue, New York, NY 10023, USA. Electronic address: tg2214@cumc.columbia.edu. ·Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am · Pubmed #28918801.

ABSTRACT: Significant advances have been made in the last few years in the technologies for sampling pancreatic masses, and in the understanding of the biology of pancreatic cancer. Better and more targeted treatments are likely to become available. Because most pancreatic cancers are likely to remain unresectable at diagnosis, high-quality, high-cellularity specimens are essential. A tailored approach that considers indication, location, and treatment possibilities needs to be taken before embarking on a pancreatic biopsy. Because the demand from oncologists and patients for increasingly personalized therapy is likely to grow, optimal sampling beyond diagnostic accuracy is likely to become increasingly critical.

4 Review Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor Associated With Antibodies to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: A Case Report and Review of the Literature. 2016

Packey, Christopher D / Wilechansky, Robert M / Khan, Ali S / Weisberg, Stuart P / Chabot, John A / Gonda, Tamas A. ·Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases Department of Medicine New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons New York, NY robert.m.wilechansky@gmail.com Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases Department of Medicine New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY Department of Pathology and Cell Biology New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY Division of GI/Endocrine Surgery Department of Surgery New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases Department of Medicine New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center New York, NY. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #27518365.

ABSTRACT: -- No abstract --

5 Review Early detection of pancreatic cancer. 2012

Eguia, Vasco / Gonda, Tamas Adam / Saif, Muhammad Wasif. ·Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY 10032, USA. ·JOP · Pubmed #22406583.

ABSTRACT: Despite treatment advances pancreatic cancer remains one of the most lethal malignancies. It is expected that early detection and screening of high risk patient population may have the most significant impact on altering overall survival in this disease. Serologic biomarkers may be the most useful in early detection and histology-based markers may have the most significant role in differentiating benign, pre-malignant and malignant lesions. Here we review several serum and tissue-based biomarkers and summarize new data presented at the 2012 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (Abstracts #151, #164, #188) on the potential role of PAM4 in pancreatic cancer screening and diagnosis.

6 Review Screening and detection of pancreatic cancer. Highlights from the "2011 ASCO Annual Meeting". Chicago, IL, USA; June 3-7, 2011. 2011

Gonda, Tamas A / Lucas, Aimee / Saif, Muhammad Wasif. ·Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. tg2214@columbia.edu ·JOP · Pubmed #21737887.

ABSTRACT: Screening and early detection of pancreatic cancer has the potential to substantially impact outcomes in this deadly disease. Over the last ten years several cohort studies have been conducted and report on the yield of screening in high risk populations. With better understanding of the cellular compartments and the genetic and epigenetic changes that occur, biomarkers have also emerged as promising means of early detection. In this paper we summarize the results of the latest screening cohort and highlight a novel proteomic approach that may be used in future biomarker studies.

7 Article Predictors of Progression Among Low-Risk Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms in a Multicenter Surveillance Cohort. 2018

Gausman, Valerie / Kandel, Pujan / Van Riet, Priscilla A / Moris, Maria / Kayal, Maia / Do, Catherine / Poneros, John M / Sethi, Amrita / Gress, Frank G / Schrope, Beth A / Luk, Lyndon / Hecht, Elizabeth / Jovani, Manol / Bruno, Marco J / Cahen, Djuna L / Wallace, Michael B / Gonda, Tamas A. · ·Pancreas · Pubmed #29521942.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Our aim was to identify baseline characteristics associated with disease progression and malignant transformation in low-risk suspected intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). METHODS: This is a retrospective cohort study of prospectively maintained databases of pancreatic cysts at 3 international, academic institutions. Five hundred fifty-nine adult patients with clinically suspected asymptomatic IPMN evaluated by radiologic studies or endoscopic ultrasound between 2003 and 2013 without worrisome features and under surveillance for 12 months or longer were included. We evaluated the relationship of baseline demographics and cyst features to disease progression (size increase, development of worrisome features, or high-grade dysplasia/cancer). RESULTS: After a median of 44 months follow-up, 269 (48%) patients experienced cyst size increase, 68 (12%) developed worrisome features, and 11 (2%) developed high-grade dysplasia/cancer. In multivariable Cox-regression analysis, no baseline characteristics were associated with size increase. An initial cyst size of 2 cm or greater, multifocality, history of prostate cancer, and smoking were the strongest predictors of development of new worrisome features. Univariable analysis found male sex, diabetes, and recent weight loss associated with development of high-grade dysplasia/cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that low-risk suspected IPMNs carry a small but clinically relevant risk of disease progression and provides data on baseline characteristics that may help in risk stratification.

8 Article Comparison of the diagnostic accuracy of three current guidelines for the evaluation of asymptomatic pancreatic cystic neoplasms. 2017

Xu, Ming-Ming / Yin, Shi / Siddiqui, Ali A / Salem, Ronald R / Schrope, Beth / Sethi, Amrita / Poneros, John M / Gress, Frank G / Genkinger, Jeanine M / Do, Catherine / Brooks, Christian A / Chabot, John A / Kluger, Michael D / Kowalski, Thomas / Loren, David E / Aslanian, Harry / Farrell, James J / Gonda, Tamas A. ·aDivision of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY bDivision of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Thomas Jefferson University Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA cSection of Surgical Oncology, Division of Surgery, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT dPancreas Center, Division of Surgery eDepartment of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health fHerbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY gSection of Digestive Disease, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA. ·Medicine (Baltimore) · Pubmed #28858107.

ABSTRACT: Asymptomatic pancreatic cysts are a common clinical problem but only a minority of these cases progress to cancer. Our aim was to compare the accuracy to detect malignancy of the 2015 American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), the 2012 International Consensus/Fukuoka (Fukuoka guidelines [FG]), and the 2010 American College of Radiology (ACR) guidelines.We conducted a retrospective study at 3 referral centers for all patients who underwent resection for an asymptomatic pancreatic cyst between January 2008 and December 2013. We compared the accuracy of 3 guidelines in predicting high-grade dysplasia (HGD) or cancer in resected cysts. We performed logistic regression analyses to examine the association between cyst features and risk of HGD or cancer.A total of 269 patients met inclusion criteria. A total of 228 (84.8%) had a benign diagnosis or low-grade dysplasia on surgical pathology, and 41 patients (15.2%) had either HGD (n = 14) or invasive cancer (n = 27). Of the 41 patients with HGD or cancer on resection, only 3 patients would have met the AGA guideline's indications for resection based on the preoperative cyst characteristics, whereas 30/41 patients would have met the FG criteria for resection and 22/41 patients met the ACR criteria. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value of HGD, and/or cancer of the AGA guidelines were 7.3%, 88.2%, 10%, and 84.1%, compared to 73.2%, 45.6%, 19.5%, and 90.4% for the FG and 53.7%, 61%, 19.8%, and 88% for the ACR guidelines. In multivariable analysis, cyst size >3 cm, compared to ≤3 cm, (odds ratio [OR] = 2.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11, 4.2) and each year increase in age (OR = 1.07, 95% CI = 1.03, 1.11) were positively associated with risk of HGD or cancer on resection.In patients with asymptomatic branch duct-intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms or mucinous cystic neoplasms who underwent resection, the prevalence rate of HGD or cancer was 15.2%. Using the 2015 AGA criteria for resection would have missed 92.6% of patients with HGD or cancer. The more "inclusive" FG and ACR had a higher sensitivity for HGD or cancer but lower specificity. Given the current deficiencies of these guidelines, it will be important to determine the acceptable rate of false-positives in order to prevent a single true-positive.

9 Article Long-Term Surveillance and Timeline of Progression of Presumed Low-Risk Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms. 2017

Kayal, Maia / Luk, Lyndon / Hecht, Elizabeth M / Do, Catherine / Schrope, Beth A / Chabot, John A / Gonda, Tamas A. ·1 Department of Internal Medicine, New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY. · 2 Present address: Department of Gastroenterology, Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, NY. · 3 Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center, 622 W 168th St, PB-1-301, New York, NY 10032. · 4 Herbert Irving Cancer Center, New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY. · 5 Department of Surgery, New York Presbyterian-Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY. ·AJR Am J Roentgenol · Pubmed #28590817.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess risk of progression and rate of growth of presumed low-risk branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms surveyed for more than 4 years. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A keyword search of electronic medical charts was performed for the years 2001-2013. Cystic lesions that met the criteria for clinical branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm, lacked baseline high-risk or worrisome features, and had more than 4 years of surveillance were included in this study. Two radiologists performed cyst size measurements to assess interreader variability. Cyst progression was defined either as 2-mm or greater or 20% or greater increase in diameter or as development of worrisome features. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated to evaluate cyst progression time and linear mixed models to evaluate growth rates. RESULTS: The search revealed 2423 patients with cystic pancreatic lesions. Among these patients 228 had imaging follow-up for 4 or more years, and 131 met the clinical criteria for branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. Among the 131 cysts, 73 (55.7%) progressed: 61 (46.6%) increased in size, 10 (7.6%) increased in size and developed worrisome features, and two (1.5%) developed worrisome features only. Of the 71 cysts that increased in size, 50 (70.4%) did so within the first 5 years, and 21 (29.6%) grew after 5 years. No patient had adenocarcinoma. There was no significant difference in growth rate based on cyst size within the first 50 months. After 50 months, cysts larger than 20 mm continued to increase in size (p < 0.05) and had faster growth rates. CONCLUSION: Among presumed low-risk branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms, most increased in size, approximately 30% after 5 years. Cysts with baseline size larger than 20 mm continued to grow beyond 5 years at a faster rate.

10 Article Progression of Incidental Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas in Liver Transplant Recipients. 2016

Dorfman, Valerie / Verna, Elizabeth C / Poneros, John M / Sethi, Amrita / Allendorf, John D / Gress, Frank G / Schrope, Beth A / Chabot, John A / Gonda, Tamas A. ·From the *Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx; †Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York; ‡Department of Surgery, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola; and §Pancreas Center, Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #26495782.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are premalignant pancreatic cysts commonly found incidentally. Immunosuppression accelerates carcinogenesis.Thus, we aimed to compare IPMN progression in liver transplant (LT) recipients on chronic immunosuppression to progression among an immunocompetent population. METHODS: We retrospectively assessed adult LT recipients between 2008 and 2014 for imaging evidence of IPMN. Diagnosis of IPMN was based on history, imaging, and cyst fluid analysis. The immunocompetent control group consisted of nontransplant patients from our pancreatic cyst surveillance program with IPMN under surveillance for greater than 12 months between 1997 and 2013. Four hundred fifty-four patients underwent LT in the study period and had cross-sectional imaging. RESULTS: The prevalence of suspected IPMN was 6.6% (30 of 454). Compared with 131 controls, the transplant cohort was younger, with increased prevalence of diabetes and smoking. The prevalence of other risk factors for IPMN progression (history of pancreatitis, family history of pancreatic cancer) was similar. After an average follow-up of 31 months, most cysts increased in diameter, with a similar increase of dominant cyst (0.4 cm vs 0.5 cm; P = 0.6). Type of immunosuppression was not associated with the increased rate of cyst growth. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that LT recipients with incidental IPMN can be managed under similar guidelines as immunocompetent patients.

11 Article Demographic features and natural history of intermediate-risk multifocal versus unifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms. 2015

Rosenblatt, Russell / Dorfman, Valerie / Epelboym, Irene / Poneros, John M / Sethi, Amrita / Lightdale, Charles / Woo, Yanghee / Gress, Frank G / Allendorf, John D / Schrope, Beth A / Chabot, John A / Gonda, Tamas A. ·From the *Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York; †Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx; ‡Pancreas Center, Department of Surgery, Columbia University Medical Center; and §Division of Digestive and Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York; and ∥Department of Surgery, Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY. ·Pancreas · Pubmed #25411806.

ABSTRACT: OBJECTIVES: This study compares the progression of multifocal (MF) intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) to unifocal (UF) lesions. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of demographics, risk factors, and cyst characteristics of a prospectively maintained database of 999 patients with pancreatic cysts. Patients included had IPMN under surveillance for 12 months or more. Those with high-risk stigmata were excluded. Cyst size progression and development of worrisome features were compared between MF and UF cohorts. We evaluated whether the dominant cyst in MF-IPMN had more significant growth than did the other cysts. RESULTS: Seventy-seven patients with MF-IPMN and 54 patients with UF-IPMN, with mean follow-up of 27 and 34 months, met the criteria. There were no significant differences between demographics, risk factors, or initial cyst sizes. Fifty-seven percent of MF dominant cysts and 48% of UF cysts increased in size (P = 0.31). Progression in MF was more likely in the dominant cyst (P < 0.05). There were no significant differences in the development of mural nodules or increase in cyst size to more than 3 cm. CONCLUSIONS: Demographics of both cohorts were similar, as was the overall incidence of worrisome features. Because meaningful size progression primarily occurred in the dominant cyst, our findings support surveillance based on the dominant cyst in MF disease.

12 Article Fine-needle aspirations of pancreatic serous cystadenomas: improving diagnostic yield with cell blocks and α-inhibin immunohistochemistry. 2014

Salomao, Marcela / Remotti, Helen / Allendorf, John D / Poneros, John M / Sethi, Amrita / Gonda, Tamas A / Saqi, Anjali. ·Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York. ·Cancer Cytopathol · Pubmed #23939868.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of serous cystadenoma (SCA), a rare benign pancreatic neoplasm, can alter the management of patients with pancreatic masses. Although characteristic imaging findings and fluid chemical analysis have been described, SCAs are not always recognized preoperatively. Furthermore, scant cellular yield on fine-needle aspiration (FNA) often leads to a nondiagnostic or nonspecific benign diagnosis. α-Inhibin (AI), a sensitive marker for SCA, is infrequently required for diagnosis in surgical specimens due to their characteristic histologic appearance. The objective of the current study was to determine whether AI staining can improve SCA diagnosis on FNA specimens. METHODS: Fifteen confirmed cases of SCA with prior FNA specimens were selected for this study. FNAs were evaluated for cellularity, cellular arrangement, and cytomorphology. Resection specimens were reviewed. RESULTS: Of the 15 FNA cases, approximately 75% demonstrated scant cellularity (11 of 15 cases). On smears, the cells were arranged as flat sheets, corresponding to strips of cells on cell block sections. The cells were small and round to cuboidal, with clear cytoplasm; occasional plasmacytoid cells and oncocytic cells were identified. Flattened cells, corresponding to attenuated epithelial cells lining macrocysts on the resections, were also noted. Stromal fragments were present in 5 FNAs and correlated with the hyalinized stroma in the resection specimens. AI immunostaining was positive in 88% of cases (7 of 8 of cases), thereby supporting the diagnosis of SCA. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the current study indicate that low cellularity and bland cytology are inherent to SCAs. Performing cell blocks and AI staining on FNA specimens is useful for establishing the diagnosis of SCA. An immunohistochemical panel including AI, chromogranin, and synaptophysin may enhance the diagnostic accuracy of pancreatic FNA specimens.

13 Article Hypomethylating therapy in an aggressive stroma-rich model of pancreatic carcinoma. 2013

Shakya, Reena / Gonda, Tamas / Quante, Michael / Salas, Martha / Kim, Samuel / Brooks, Jenna / Hirsch, Steffen / Davies, Justine / Cullo, Angelica / Olive, Kenneth / Wang, Timothy C / Szabolcs, Matthias / Tycko, Benjamin / Ludwig, Thomas. ·Institute for Cancer Genetics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ·Cancer Res · Pubmed #23204224.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a lethal malignancy that resists current treatments. To test epigenetic therapy against this cancer, we used the DNA demethylating drug 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC) in an aggressive mouse model of stromal rich PDAC (KPC-Brca1 mice). In untreated tumors, we found globally decreased 5-methyl-cytosine (5-mC) in malignant epithelial cells and in cancer-associated myofibroblasts (CAF), along with increased amounts of 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine (5-HmC) in CAFs, in progression from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia to PDAC. DAC further reduced DNA methylation and slowed PDAC progression, markedly extending survival in an early-treatment protocol and significantly though transiently inhibiting tumor growth when initiated later, without adverse side effects. Escaping tumors contained areas of sarcomatoid transformation with disappearance of CAFs. Mixing-allografting experiments and proliferation indices showed that DAC efficacy was due to inhibition of both the malignant epithelial cells and the CAFs. Expression profiling and immunohistochemistry highlighted DAC induction of STAT1 in the tumors, and DAC plus IFN-γ produced an additive antiproliferative effect on PDAC cells. DAC induced strong expression of the testis antigen deleted in azoospermia-like (DAZL) in CAFs. These data show that DAC is effective against PDAC in vivo and provide a rationale for future studies combining hypomethylating agents with cytokines and immunotherapy.

14 Unspecified Early detection and screening of pancreatic cancer. Highlights from the "2011 ASCO Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium". San Francisco, CA, USA. January 20-22, 2011. 2011

Gonda, Tamas A / Saif, Muhammad Wasif. ·Division of Digestive and Liver Disease, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. tg2214@columbia.edu ·JOP · Pubmed #21386626.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer presents at an advanced stage in majority of the patients, hence resulting in a very dismal prognosis. Novel and effective methods to detect and screen pancreatic cancer and its precursors are warranted. The U.S. Multi-Society Task Force recommends against routine screening for pancreatic cancer in asymptomatic adults using abdominal palpation, ultrasonography, or serologic markers. Moreover, the screening for persons with hereditary predisposition to develop pancreatic cancer has not been validated. Herein, the authors summarize the data presented at the 2011 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium in detecting early stage pancreatic cancer (Abstracts #187 and #193).