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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by Edda L. Gomez-Panzani
Based on 2 articles published since 2010
(Why 2 articles?)
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Between 2010 and 2020, Edda Gomez-Panzani wrote the following 2 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Clinical Trial Anti-tumour effects of lanreotide for pancreatic and intestinal neuroendocrine tumours: the CLARINET open-label extension study. 2016

Caplin, Martyn E / Pavel, Marianne / Ćwikła, Jarosław B / Phan, Alexandria T / Raderer, Markus / Sedláčková, Eva / Cadiot, Guillaume / Wolin, Edward M / Capdevila, Jaume / Wall, Lucy / Rindi, Guido / Langley, Alison / Martinez, Séverine / Gomez-Panzani, Edda / Ruszniewski, Philippe / Anonymous1290854. ·Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France m.caplin@ucl.ac.uk. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. · Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France Royal Free HospitalLondon, UKCharité University Medicine BerlinBerlin, GermanyUniversity of Warmia and MazuryOlsztyn, PolandUniversity of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, Texas, USAUniversity HospitalVienna, AustriaDepartment of Oncology of the First Faculty of Medicine and General Teaching HospitalPrague, Czech RepublicRobert-Debré HospitalReims, FranceMarkey Cancer CenterUniversity of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, USAVall d'Hebron University HospitalBarcelona, SpainWestern General HospitalEdinburgh, UKUniversità Cattolica del Sacro CuoreRome, ItalyIpsenLes Ulis, FranceIpsenBasking Ridge, New Jersey, USABeaujon HospitalClichy, FranceParis Diderot UniversityParis, France. ·Endocr Relat Cancer · Pubmed #26743120.

ABSTRACT: In the CLARINET study, lanreotide Autogel (depot in USA) significantly prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic pancreatic/intestinal neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). We report long-term safety and additional efficacy data from the open-label extension (OLE). Patients with metastatic grade 1/2 (Ki-67 ≤ 10%) non-functioning NET and documented baseline tumour-progression status received lanreotide Autogel 120 mg (n = 101) or placebo (n = 103) for 96 weeks or until death/progressive disease (PD) in CLARINET study. Patients with stable disease (SD) at core study end (lanreotide/placebo) or PD (placebo only) continued or switched to lanreotide in the OLE. In total, 88 patients (previously: lanreotide, n = 41; placebo, n = 47) participated: 38% had pancreatic, 39% midgut and 23% other/unknown primary tumours. Patients continuing lanreotide reported fewer adverse events (AEs) (all and treatment-related) during OLE than core study. Placebo-to-lanreotide switch patients reported similar AE rates in OLE and core studies, except more diarrhoea was considered treatment-related in OLE (overall diarrhoea unchanged). Median lanreotide PFS (core study randomisation to PD in core/OLE; n=101) was 32.8 months (95% CI: 30.9, 68.0). A sensitivity analysis, addressing potential selection bias by assuming that patients with SD on lanreotide in the core study and not entering the OLE (n=13) had PD 24 weeks after last core assessment, found median PFS remaining consistent: 30.8 months (95% CI: 30.0, 31.3). Median time to further PD after placebo-to-lanreotide switch (n=32) was 14.0 months (10.1; not reached). This OLE study suggests long-term treatment with lanreotide Autogel 120 mg maintained favourable safety/tolerability. CLARINET OLE data also provide new evidence of lanreotide anti-tumour benefits in indolent and progressive pancreatic/intestinal NETs.

2 Article Population Pharmacokinetic Analysis of Lanreotide Autogel/Depot in the Treatment of Neuroendocrine Tumors: Pooled Analysis of Four Clinical Trials. 2016

Buil-Bruna, Núria / Garrido, María Jesús / Dehez, Marion / Manon, Amandine / Nguyen, Thi Xuan Quyen / Gomez-Panzani, Edda L / Trocóniz, Iñaki F. ·Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31080, Pamplona, Spain. · Clinical Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacokinetics and Drug Metabolism, Ipsen Innovation, Les Ulis, France. · Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, School of Pharmacy, University of Navarra, Irunlarrea 1, 31080, Pamplona, Spain. itroconiz@unav.es. · IdisNA, Navarra Institute for Health Research, Pamplona, Spain. itroconiz@unav.es. ·Clin Pharmacokinet · Pubmed #26416534.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Lanreotide Autogel (lanreotide Depot in the USA) has demonstrated anti-tumor activity and control of the symptoms associated with hormone hypersecretion in patients with neuroendocrine tumors. The objectives of this study were to describe the pharmacokinetics of lanreotide Autogel administered 4-weekly by deep subcutaneous injections of 60, 90, or 120 mg in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs), to quantify the magnitude of inter-patient variability (IPV), and to identify those patient characteristics that impact on pharmacokinetics. METHODS: Analyses were based on pooled data from clinical trials. A total of 1541 serum concentrations from 290 patients were analyzed simultaneously by the population approach using NONMEM version 7.2. Covariates evaluated included demographics, renal and hepatic function markers, and disease-related parameters. RESULTS: Serum profiles were described by a one-compartment disposition model in which the absorption process was characterized by two parallel pathways following first- and zero-order kinetics. The estimated apparent volume of distribution was 18.3 L. The estimated apparent total serum clearance for a typical 74 kg patient was 513 L/day, representing a substantial difference in clearance in this population of patients with respect to healthy volunteers that could not be explained by any of the covariates tested. Body weight was the only covariate to show a statistically significant effect on the pharmacokinetic profile, but due to the overlap between the pharmacokinetic profiles of patients with lower or higher body weights the effect of body weight on clearance was not considered clinically relevant. The IPV was low for clearance (27%) and moderate to high for volume of distribution (150%) and the absorption constant (61%). CONCLUSIONS: Using two mechanisms of absorption, the pharmacokinetics of lanreotide Autogel were well-described in patients with GEP-NET. None of the patient characteristics tested were of clinical relevance to potential dose adjustment in clinical practice.