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Pancreatic Neoplasms: HELP
Articles by D. Goldstein
Based on 11 articles published since 2009
(Why 11 articles?)
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Between 2009 and 2019, D. Goldstein wrote the following 11 articles about Pancreatic Neoplasms.
 
+ Citations + Abstracts
1 Review Meta-analysis of radical resection rates and margin assessment in pancreatic cancer. 2015

Chandrasegaram, M D / Goldstein, D / Simes, J / Gebski, V / Kench, J G / Gill, A J / Samra, J S / Merrett, N D / Richardson, A J / Barbour, A P. ·National Health and Medical Research Clinical Trials Centre, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Prince Charles Hospital, Queensland, Australia. · Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Prince of Wales Clinical School University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Tissue Pathology and Diagnostic Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Cancer Diagnosis and Pathology Research Group, Kolling Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. · Discipline of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Western Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. · Department of Surgery, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales, Australia. · University of Queensland, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. ·Br J Surg · Pubmed #26350029.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: R0 resection rates (complete tumour removal with negative resection margins) in pancreatic cancer are 70-80 per cent when a 0-mm margin is used, declining to 15-24 per cent with a 1-mm margin. This review evaluated the R0 resection rates according to different margin definitions and techniques. METHODS: Three databases (MEDLINE from 1946, PubMed from 1946 and Embase from 1949) were searched to mid-October 2014. The search terms included 'pancreatectomy OR pancreaticoduodenectomy' and 'margin'. A meta-analysis was performed with studies in three groups: group 1, axial slicing technique (minimum 1-mm margin); group 2, other slicing techniques (minimum 1-mm margin); and group 3, studies with minimum 0-mm margin. RESULTS: The R0 rates were 29 (95 per cent c.i. 26 to 32) per cent in group 1 (8 studies; 882 patients) and 49 (47 to 52) per cent in group 2 (6 studies; 1568 patients). The combined R0 rate (groups 1 and 2) was 41 (40 to 43) per cent. The R0 rate in group 3 (7 studies; 1926 patients) with a 0-mm margin was 72 (70 to 74) per cent The survival hazard ratios (R1 resection/R0 resection) revealed a reduction in the risk of death of at least 22 per cent in group 1, 12 per cent in group 2 and 23 per cent in group 3 with an R0 compared with an R1 resection. Local recurrence occurred more frequently with an R1 resection in most studies. CONCLUSION: Margin clearance definitions affect R0 resection rates in pancreatic cancer surgery. This review collates individual studies providing an estimate of achievable R0 rates, creating a benchmark for future trials.

2 Review Pancreatic cancer: The microenvironment needs attention too! 2015

Apte, M V / Xu, Z / Pothula, S / Goldstein, D / Pirola, R C / Wilson, J S. ·Pancreatic Research Group, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. Electronic address: m.apte@unsw.edu.au. · Pancreatic Research Group, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, Australia. · Pancreatic Research Group, South Western Sydney Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia; Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, and Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #25845856.

ABSTRACT: The abundant stromal/desmoplastic reaction, a characteristic feature of a majority of pancreatic adenocarcinomas (PDAC), has only recently been receiving some attention regarding its possible role in the pathobiology of pancreatic cancer. It is now well established that the cells predominantly responsible for producing the collagenous stroma are pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs). In addition to extracellular matrix proteins, the stroma also exhibits cellular elements including, immune cells, endothelial cells and neural cells. Evidence is accumulating to indicate the presence of significant interactions between PSCs and cancer cells as well as between PSCs and other cell types in the stroma. The majority of research reports to date, using in vitro and in vivo approaches, suggest that these interactions facilitate local growth as well as distant metastasis of pancreatic cancer, although a recent study using animals depleted of myofibroblasts has raised some questions regarding the central role of myofibroblasts in cancer progression. Nonetheless, novel therapeutic strategies have been assessed, mainly in the pre-clinical setting, in a bid to interrupt stromal-tumour interactions and inhibit disease progression. The next important challenge is for the translation of such pre-clinical strategies to the clinical situation so as to improve the outcome of patients with pancreatic cancer.

3 Clinical Trial Significance of baseline and change in quality of life scores in predicting clinical outcomes in an international phase III trial of advanced pancreatic cancer: NCIC CTG PA.3. 2016

Vickers, M M / Lee, C / Tu, D / Wheatley-Price, P / Parulekar, W / Brundage, M D / Moore, M J / Au, H / O'Callaghan, C J / Jonker, D J / Ringash, J / Goldstein, D. ·The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada. Electronic address: mvickers@toh.ca. · NHMRC Clinical Trials Centre, The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · NCIC Clinical Trials Group, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada. · The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Center, Ottawa, ON, Canada. · Kingston Cancer Centre, Kingston, ON, Canada. · BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada. · Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada. · Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #27600995.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There is insufficient information regarding the prognostic significance of baseline and change in quality of life (QoL) scores on overall survival (OS) in advanced pancreatic cancer. METHODS: QoL was assessed prospectively using the EORTC QLQ-C30 as part of the PA.3 trial of gemcitabine + erlotinib (G + E) vs. gemcitabine + placebo (G + P). Relevant variables and QoL scores at baseline and change at 8 weeks were analyzed by Cox stepwise regression to determine predictors of OS. RESULTS: 222 of 285 patients (pts) treated with G + E and 220 of 284 pts treated with G + P completed baseline QoL assessments. In a multivariable Cox analysis combining all pts, better QoL physical functioning (PF) score independently predicted longer OS (HR 0.86; CI: 0.80-0.93), as did non-white race (HR 0.64; CI: 0.44-0.95), PS 0-1 (HR 0.65; CI: 0.50-0.85), locally advanced disease (HR 0.55; CI: 0.43-0.71) and G + E (HR 0.78; CI: 0.64-0.96). Improvement in physical function at week 8 also predicted for improved survival (HR 0.89; CI: 0.81-0.97 for 10 point increase in score, p = 0.02). CONCLUSION: In addition to clinical variables, patient reported QoL scores at baseline and change from baseline to week 8 added incremental predictive information regarding survival for advanced pancreatic cancer patients.

4 Clinical Trial CA19-9 decrease at 8 weeks as a predictor of overall survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. 2016

Chiorean, E G / Von Hoff, D D / Reni, M / Arena, F P / Infante, J R / Bathini, V G / Wood, T E / Mainwaring, P N / Muldoon, R T / Clingan, P R / Kunzmann, V / Ramanathan, R K / Tabernero, J / Goldstein, D / McGovern, D / Lu, B / Ko, A. ·Department of Medicine/Oncology, University of Washington, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle gchiorea@uw.edu. · HonorHealth and The Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen), Scottsdale, USA. · Department of Radiation Oncology, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. · Department of Oncology, NYU Langone Arena Oncology, Lake Success. · Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Tennessee Oncology, PLLC, Nashville. · Cancer Center of Excellence, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester. · UAB Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, USA. · Mater Private Centre for Haematology & Oncology, South Brisbane, Australia. · Department of Oncology, Genesis Cancer Center, Hot Springs, USA. · Southern Medical Day Care Centre, Wollongong, Australia. · Medizinische Klinik und Poliklinik II, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg, Germany. · Medical of Medical Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · Department of Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Celgene Corporation, Summit, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26802160.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: A phase I/II study and subsequent phase III study (MPACT) reported significant correlations between CA19-9 decreases and prolonged overall survival (OS) with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). CA19-9 changes at week 8 and potential associations with efficacy were investigated as part of an exploratory analysis in the MPACT trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Untreated patients with MPC (N = 861) received nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. CA19-9 was evaluated at baseline and every 8 weeks. RESULTS: Patients with baseline and week-8 CA19-9 measurements were analyzed (nab-P + Gem: 252; Gem: 202). In an analysis pooling the treatments, patients with any CA19-9 decline (80%) versus those without (20%) had improved OS (median 11.1 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In the nab-P + Gem arm, patients with (n = 206) versus without (n = 46) any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed overall response rate (ORR) of 40% versus 13%, and a median OS of 13.2 versus 8.3 months (P = 0.001), respectively. In the Gem-alone arm, patients with (n = 159) versus without (n = 43) CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed ORR of 15% versus 5%, and a median OS of 9.4 versus 7.1 months (P = 0.404), respectively. In the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, by week 8, 16% (40/252) and 6% (13/202) of patients, respectively, had an unconfirmed radiologic response (median OS 13.7 and 14.7 months, respectively), and 79% and 84% of patients, respectively, had stable disease (SD) (median OS 11.1 and 9 months, respectively). Patients with SD and any CA19-9 decrease (158/199 and 133/170) had a median OS of 13.2 and 9.4 months, respectively. CONCLUSION: This analysis demonstrated that, in patients with MPC, any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 can be an early marker for chemotherapy efficacy, including in those patients with SD. CA19-9 decrease identified more patients with survival benefit than radiologic response by week 8.

5 Clinical Trial Positron emission tomography response evaluation from a randomized phase III trial of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone for patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas. 2016

Ramanathan, R K / Goldstein, D / Korn, R L / Arena, F / Moore, M / Siena, S / Teixeira, L / Tabernero, J / Van Laethem, J-L / Liu, H / McGovern, D / Lu, B / Von Hoff, D D. ·Division of Hematology/Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, USA ramanathan.ramesh@mayo.edu. · Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Diagnostic Radiology, Scottsdale Medical Imaging, Ltd, Scottsdale. · Hematology/Oncology, NYU Langone Arena Oncology, Lake Success, USA. · Provencial Health Services Authority, BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, Canada. · Falck Division of Oncology, Department of Oncology and Hematology, Niguarda Cancer Center, Ospedale Niguarda Ca' Granda and Università degli Studi di Millano, Milan, Italy. · Department of Medical Oncology, Hôpital Saint-Antoine, Paris, France. · Department of Medical Oncology, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital and Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain. · University Clinic of Brussels, Hôpital Erasme, Brussels, Belgium. · Biostatistics and Research and Design, Celgene Corporation, Summit. · Clinical Research, Translational Genomics Research Institute and Honor Health, Scottsdale, USA. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26802153.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: In the phase III MPACT trial, nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) demonstrated superior efficacy versus Gem alone for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. We sought to examine the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) and to compare metabolic response rates and associated correlations with efficacy in the MPACT trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients with previously untreated metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were randomized 1:1 to receive nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. Treatment continued until disease progression by RECIST or unacceptable toxicity. RESULTS: PET scans were carried out on the first 257 patients enrolled at PET-equipped centers (PET cohort). Most patients (252 of 257) had ≥2 PET-avid lesions, and median maximum standardized uptake values at baseline were 4.6 and 4.5 in the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, respectively. In a pooled treatment arm analysis, a metabolic response by PET (best response at any time during study) was associated with longer overall survival (OS) (median 11.3 versus 6.9 months; HR, 0.56; P < 0.001). Efficacy results within each treatment arm appeared better for patients with a metabolic response. The metabolic response rate (best response and week 8 response) was higher for nab-P + Gem (best response: 72% versus 53%, P = 0.002; week 8: 67% versus 51%; P = 0.014). Efficacy in the PET cohort was greater for nab-P + Gem versus Gem alone, including for OS (median 10.5 versus 8.4 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; P = 0.009) and ORR by RECIST (31% versus 11%; P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Pancreatic lesions were PET avid at baseline, and the rate of metabolic response was significantly higher for nab-P + Gem versus Gem alone at week 8 and for best response during study. Having a metabolic response was associated with longer survival, and more patients experienced a metabolic response than a RECIST-defined response. CLINICALTRIALSGOV: NCT00844649.

6 Clinical Trial The GOFURTGO Study: AGITG phase II study of fixed dose rate gemcitabine-oxaliplatin integrated with concomitant 5FU and 3-D conformal radiotherapy for the treatment of localised pancreatic cancer. 2012

Goldstein, D / Spry, N / Cummins, M M / Brown, C / van Hazel, G A / Carroll, S / Selva-Nayagam, S / Borg, M / Ackland, S P / Wratten, C / Shapiro, J / Porter, I W T / Hruby, G / Horvath, L / Bydder, S / Underhill, C / Harvey, J / Gebski, V J / Anonymous650712. ·Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, High Street, Randwick, New South Wales 2031, Australia. david.goldstein@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #22134511.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Locally advanced inoperable pancreatic cancer (LAPC) has a poor prognosis. By increasing intensity of systemic therapy combined with an established safe chemoradiation technique, our intention was to enhance the outcomes of LAPC. In preparation for phase III evaluation, the feasibility and efficacy of our candidate regimen gemcitabine-oxaliplatin chemotherapy with sandwich 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) needs to be established. METHODS: A total of 48 patients with inoperable LAPC without metastases were given gemcitabine (1000 mg m(-2) d1 + d15 q28) and oxaliplatin (100 mg m(-2) d2 + d16 q28) in induction (one cycle) and consolidation (three cycles), and 5FU 200 mg m(-2) per day over 6 weeks during 3DCRT 54 Gy. RESULTS: Median duration of sustained local control (LC) was 15.8 months, progression-free survival (PFS) was 11.0 months, and overall survival was 15.7 months. Survival rates for 1, 2, and 3 years were 70.2%, 21.3%, and 12.8%, respectively. Global quality of life did not significantly decline from baseline during treatment, which was associated with modest treatment-related toxicity. CONCLUSION: Fixed-dose gemcitabine and oxaliplatin, combined with an effective and safe regimen of 5FU and 3DCRT radiotherapy, was feasible and reasonably tolerated. The observed improved duration of LC and PFS with more intensive therapy over previous trials may be due to patient selection, but suggest that further evaluation in phase III trials is warranted.

7 Article Intratumoural expression of deoxycytidylate deaminase or ribonuceotide reductase subunit M1 expression are not related to survival in patients with resected pancreatic cancer given adjuvant chemotherapy. 2018

Elander, N O / Aughton, K / Ghaneh, P / Neoptolemos, J P / Palmer, D H / Cox, T F / Campbell, F / Costello, E / Halloran, C M / Mackey, J R / Scarfe, A G / Valle, J W / McDonald, A C / Carter, R / Tebbutt, N C / Goldstein, D / Shannon, J / Dervenis, C / Glimelius, B / Deakin, M / Charnley, R M / Anthoney, A / Lerch, M M / Mayerle, J / Oláh, A / Büchler, M W / Greenhalf, W / Anonymous1351258. ·Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, UK. · Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, UK. · Austin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. · Prince of Wales hospital and Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Nepean Cancer Centre and University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW, Australia. · The Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · University Hospital, North Staffordshire, Staffordshire, UK. · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich, Germany. · The Petz Aladar Hospital, Gyor, Hungary. · Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. greenhaf@liv.ac.uk. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #29523831.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Deoxycytidylate deaminase (DCTD) and ribonucleotide reductase subunit M1 (RRM1) are potential prognostic and predictive biomarkers for pyrimidine-based chemotherapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. METHODS: Immunohistochemical staining of DCTD and RRM1 was performed on tissue microarrays representing tumour samples from 303 patients in European Study Group for Pancreatic Cancer (ESPAC)-randomised adjuvant trials following pancreatic resection, 272 of whom had received gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil with folinic acid in ESPAC-3(v2), and 31 patients from the combined ESPAC-3(v1) and ESPAC-1 post-operative pure observational groups. RESULTS: Neither log-rank testing on dichotomised strata or Cox proportional hazard regression showed any relationship of DCTD or RRM1 expression levels to survival overall or by treatment group. CONCLUSIONS: Expression of either DCTD or RRM1 was not prognostic or predictive in patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma who had had post-operative chemotherapy with either gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil with folinic acid.

8 Article Expression of dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) and hENT1 predicts survival in pancreatic cancer. 2018

Elander, N O / Aughton, K / Ghaneh, P / Neoptolemos, J P / Palmer, D H / Cox, T F / Campbell, F / Costello, E / Halloran, C M / Mackey, J R / Scarfe, A G / Valle, J W / McDonald, A C / Carter, R / Tebbutt, N C / Goldstein, D / Shannon, J / Dervenis, C / Glimelius, B / Deakin, M / Charnley, R M / Anthoney, Alan / Lerch, M M / Mayerle, J / Oláh, A / Büchler, M W / Greenhalf, W / Anonymous1151214. ·From the Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. · The Department of Surgery, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. · Cross Cancer Institute and University of Alberta, Alberta, Canada. · University of Manchester/The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. · The Beatson West of Scotland Cancer Centre, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. · Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Glasgow, Scotland, UK. · Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia. · Prince of Wales hospital and Clinical School University of New South Wales, New South Wales, Australia. · Nepean Cancer Centre and University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. · The Agia Olga Hospital, Athens, Greece. · Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. · University Hospital, North Staffordshire, UK. · Freeman Hospital, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. · St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK. · Department of Medicine A, University Medicine Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany. · Department of Medicine II, University Hospital of the Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany. · The Petz Aladar Hospital, Gyor, Hungary. · From the Cancer Research U.K. Liverpool Cancer Trials Unit, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, UK. greenhaf@liv.ac.uk. ·Br J Cancer · Pubmed #29515256.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPD) tumour expression may provide added value to human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 (hENT1) tumour expression in predicting survival following pyrimidine-based adjuvant chemotherapy. METHODS: DPD and hENT1 immunohistochemistry and scoring was completed on tumour cores from 238 patients with pancreatic cancer in the ESPAC-3(v2) trial, randomised to either postoperative gemcitabine or 5-fluorouracil/folinic acid (5FU/FA). RESULTS: DPD tumour expression was associated with reduced overall survival (hazard ratio, HR = 1.73 [95% confidence interval, CI = 1.21-2.49], p = 0.003). This was significant in the 5FU/FA arm (HR = 2.07 [95% CI = 1.22-3.53], p = 0.007), but not in the gemcitabine arm (HR = 1.47 [0.91-3.37], p = 0.119). High hENT1 tumour expression was associated with increased survival in gemcitabine treated (HR = 0.56 [0.38-0.82], p = 0.003) but not in 5FU/FA treated patients (HR = 1.19 [0.80-1.78], p = 0.390). In patients with low hENT1 tumour expression, high DPD tumour expression was associated with a worse median [95% CI] survival in the 5FU/FA arm (9.7 [5.3-30.4] vs 29.2 [19.5-41.9] months, p = 0.002) but not in the gemcitabine arm (14.0 [9.1-15.7] vs. 18.0 [7.6-15.3] months, p = 1.000). The interaction of treatment arm and DPD expression was not significant (p = 0.303), but the interaction of treatment arm and hENT1 expression was (p = 0.009). CONCLUSION: DPD tumour expression was a negative prognostic biomarker. Together with tumour expression of hENT1, DPD tumour expression defined patient subgroups that might benefit from either postoperative 5FU/FA or gemcitabine.

9 Article Delineating the Role of βIV-Tubulins in Pancreatic Cancer: βIVb-Tubulin Inhibition Sensitizes Pancreatic Cancer Cells to Vinca Alkaloids. 2016

Sharbeen, G / McCarroll, J / Liu, J / Youkhana, J / Limbri, L F / Biankin, A V / Johns, A / Kavallaris, M / Goldstein, D / Phillips, P A. ·Pancreatic Cancer Translational Research Group, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia, 2052. · Children's Cancer Institute, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, UNSW, Sydney, Australia, 2031; Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, UNSW, Australia. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, Australia; Wolfson Wohl Cancer Research Centre, Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Glasgow, Bearsden, Glasgow, Scotland G61 1BD, United Kingdom. · The Kinghorn Cancer Centre, Cancer Program, Garvan Institute of Medical Research, Darlinghurst, Sydney, Australia. · Pancreatic Cancer Translational Research Group, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales (UNSW), Sydney, Australia, 2052; Australian Centre for NanoMedicine, ARC Centre of Excellence in Convergent Bio-Nano Science and Technology, UNSW, Australia. Electronic address: p.phillips@unsw.edu.au. ·Neoplasia · Pubmed #27889644.

ABSTRACT: Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a lethal disease which is characterized by chemoresistance. Components of the cell cytoskeleton are therapeutic targets in cancer. βIV-tubulin is one such component that has two isotypes-βIVa and βIVb. βIVa and βIVb isotypes only differ in two amino acids at their C-terminus. Studies have implicated βIVa-tubulin or βIVb-tubulin expression with chemoresistance in prostate, breast, ovarian and lung cancer. However, no studies have examined the role of βIV-tubulin in PC or attempted to identify isotype specific roles in regulating cancer cell growth and chemosensitivity. We aimed to determine the role of βIVa- or βIVb-tubulin on PC growth and chemosensitivity. PC cells (MiaPaCa-2, HPAF-II, AsPC1) were treated with siRNA (control, βIVa-tubulin or βIVb-tubulin). The ability of PC cells to form colonies in the presence or absence of chemotherapy was measured by clonogenic assays. Inhibition of βIVa-tubulin in PC cells had no effect chemosensitivity. In contrast, inhibition of βIVb-tubulin in PC cells sensitized to vinca alkaloids (Vincristine, Vinorelbine and Vinblastine), which was accompanied by increased apoptosis and enhanced cell cycle arrest. We show for the first time that βIVb-tubulin, but not βIVa-tubulin, plays a role in regulating vinca alkaloid chemosensitivity in PC cells. The results from this study suggest βIVb-tubulin may be a novel therapeutic target and predictor of vinca alkaloid sensitivity for PC and warrants further investigation.

10 Article Determinants of survival and attempted resection in patients with non-metastatic pancreatic cancer: An Australian population-based study. 2016

Burmeister, E A / Waterhouse, M / Jordan, S J / O'Connell, D L / Merrett, N D / Goldstein, D / Wyld, D / Beesley, V / Gooden, H / Janda, M / Neale, R E. ·QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: Elizabeth.Burmeister@qimrberghofer.edu.au. · QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. · Cancer Council NSW, Sydney, Australia; University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Western Sydney University, NSW, Australia; Bankstown Hospital, NSW, Australia. · University of New South Wales, NSW, Australia; Prince of Wales Hospital, NSW, Australia. · The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia. · University of Sydney, NSW, Australia. · Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. ·Pancreatology · Pubmed #27374480.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: There are indications that pancreatic cancer survival may differ according to sociodemographic factors, such as residential location. This may be due to differential access to curative resection. Understanding factors associated with the decision to offer a resection might enable strategies to increase the proportion of patients undergoing potentially curative surgery. METHODS: Data were extracted from medical records and cancer registries for patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer between July 2009 and June 2011, living in one of two Australian states. Among patients clinically staged with non-metastatic disease we examined factors associated with survival using Cox proportional hazards models. To investigate survival differences we examined determinants of: 1) attempted surgical resection overall; 2) whether patients with locally advanced disease were classified as having resectable disease; and 3) attempted resection among those considered resectable. RESULTS: Data were collected for 786 eligible patients. Disease was considered locally advanced for 561 (71%) patients, 510 (65%) were classified as having potentially resectable disease and 365 (72%) of these had an attempted resection. Along with age, comorbidities and tumour stage, increasing remoteness of residence was associated with poorer survival. Remoteness of residence and review by a hepatobiliary surgeon were factors influencing the decision to offer surgery. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicated disparity in survival dependent on patients' residential location and access to a specialist hepatobiliary surgeon. Accurate clinical staging is a critical element in assessing surgical resectability and it is therefore crucial that all patients have access to specialised clinical services.

11 Article Prognostic factors for progression-free and overall survival in advanced biliary tract cancer. 2016

Bridgewater, J / Lopes, A / Wasan, H / Malka, D / Jensen, L / Okusaka, T / Knox, J / Wagner, D / Cunningham, D / Shannon, J / Goldstein, D / Moehler, M / Bekaii-Saab, T / McNamara, M G / Valle, J W. ·UCL Cancer Institute, UCL, London j.bridgewater@ucl.ac.uk. · UCL and CRUK Clinical Trials Centre, UCL, London. · Department of Oncology, Imperial Healthcare, London, UK. · Department of Cancer Medicine, Institute Gustave Roussy, Paris, France. · Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark. · Division of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Centre Hospital, Tokyo, Japan. · Department of Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Canada. · Department of Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland. · Department of Medicine, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton, UK. · Department of Oncology, Nepean Cancer Centre, Sydney. · Department of Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, Australia. · Department of Internal Medicine, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Mainz, Germany. · Department of Oncology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, USA. · Institute of Cancer Sciences, The University of Manchester and The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. ·Ann Oncol · Pubmed #26483051.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Biliary tract cancer is an uncommon cancer with a poor outcome. We assembled data from the National Cancer Research Institute (UK) ABC-02 study and 10 international studies to determine prognostic outcome characteristics for patients with advanced disease. METHODS: Multivariable analyses of the final dataset from the ABC-02 study were carried out. All variables were simultaneously included in a Cox proportional hazards model, and backward elimination was used to produce the final model (using a significance level of 10%), in which the selected variables were associated independently with outcome. This score was validated externally by receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis using the independent international dataset. RESULTS: A total of 410 patients were included from the ABC-02 study and 753 from the international dataset. An overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) Cox model was derived from the ABC-02 study. White blood cells, haemoglobin, disease status, bilirubin, neutrophils, gender, and performance status were considered prognostic for survival (all with P < 0.10). Patients with metastatic disease {hazard ratio (HR) 1.56 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20-2.02]} and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) 2 had worse survival [HR 2.24 (95% CI 1.53-3.28)]. In a dataset restricted to patients who received cisplatin and gemcitabine with ECOG PS 0 and 1, only haemoglobin, disease status, bilirubin, and neutrophils were associated with PFS and OS. ROC analysis suggested the models generated from the ABC-02 study had a limited prognostic value [6-month PFS: area under the curve (AUC) 62% (95% CI 57-68); 1-year OS: AUC 64% (95% CI 58-69)]. CONCLUSION: These data propose a set of prognostic criteria for outcome in advanced biliary tract cancer derived from the ABC-02 study that are validated in an international dataset. Although these findings establish the benchmark for the prognostic evaluation of patients with ABC and confirm the value of longheld clinical observations, the ability of the model to correctly predict prognosis is limited and needs to be improved through identification of additional clinical and molecular markers.